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DIXIE.

[The original of this popular Southern song, of which there were many variations during the war, is believed to be a Northern melodyan old negro refrain, dating back to the time when slavery existed in New York; a certain Mr. Dixy, or Dixie, owning large tracts of land on Manhattan Island, and many slaves, among whom the estate was known as Dixie's Land.”]

SOUTHRONS, hear your country call you !
Up, lest worse than death befall you !

To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie !
Lo! all the beacon-fires are lighted
Let all hearts be now united !
To arins! To aris ! To arms, in Dixie !
Advance the flag of Dixie !

Hurrah ! hurrah!
For Dixie's land we take our stand,
And live or die for Dixie!

To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie !

To arms! To arms !
And conquer peace for Dixie !
Hear the Northern thunders mutter!
Northern flags in South winds flutter!

To arms!
Send them back your fierce defiance !
Stamp upon the accursed alliance !

To arms!
Advance the flag of Dixie !
Fear no danger! Shun no labor!
Lift up rifle, pike, and sabre !

To arnis !
Shoulder pressing close to shoulder,
Let the odds make each heart bolder!

To arnis!
Advance the flag of Dixie !

How the South's great heart rejoices
At your cannons' ringing voices !

To arms /
For faith betrayed, and pledges broken,
Wrongs inflicted, insults spoken,

To arms /
Advance the flag of Dixie !
Strong as lions, swift as eagles,
Back to their kennels hunt these beagles !

To arms!
Cut the unequal bonds asunder!
Let them hence each other plunder!

To arms!
Advance the flag of Dixie!
Swear upon your country's altar
Never to submit or falter !

To arms!
Till the spoilers are defeated,
Till the Lord's work is completed.

To arms!
Advance the flag of Dixie!
Halt not till our Federation
Secures among earth's powers its station !

To arms!
Then at peace, and crowned with glory,
Hear your children tell the story!

To arms!
Advance the flag of Dixie !
If the loved ones weep in sadness,
Victory soon shall bring them gladness.

To arms!
Exultant pride soon vanish sorrow;
Smiles chase tears away to-morrow.
To arms ! To arms! To arins, in Dixie !
Advance the flag of Dixie !

Hurrah? hurrah !

For Dixie's land we take our stand,
And live or die for Dixie !

To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie!

To arms! To arms!
And conquer peace for Dirie!

ALBERT PIKE.

THE NINETEENTH OF APRIL.

[Boston, 1861.]

This year, till late in April, the snow fell thick and

light; Thy truce-flag, friendly Nature, in clinging drifts of

white Hung over field and city; now everywhere is seen, In place of that white quietness, a sudden glow of

green.

The verdure climbs the Common, beneath the leaf

less trees, To where the glorious Stars and Stripes are floating

on the breeze. There, suddenly as Spring awoke from Winter's

snow-draped gloom, The passion-flower of Seventy-six is bursting into

bloom. Dear is the time of roses, when earth to joy is wed, And garden-plat and meadow wear one generous

flush of red ; But now in dearer beauty, to her ancient colors

true, Blooms the old town of Boston in red and white and

blue.

Along the whole awakening North are those bright

emblems spread ; A summer noon of patriotism is burning overhead; No party badges flaunting now, no word of clique

or clan; But“ Up for God and Union !" is the shout of every

man,

Oh, peace is dear to Northern hearts; our hard

earned homes more dear; But freedom is beyond the price of any earthly

cheer; And freedom's flag is sacred : he who would work

it harm, Let him, although a brother, beware our strong

right arm ! A brother! ah, the sorrow, the anguish of that

word! The fratricidal strife begun, when will its end be

heard ? Not this the boon that patriots' hearts have prayed

and waited for ; We loved them, and we longed for peace: but they

would have it war. Yes, war! on this memorial day, the day of Lex

ington, A lightning-thrill along the wires from heart to

heart has run. Brave men we gazed on yesterday, to-day for us

have bled : Again is Massachusetts blood the first for freedom

shed.

To war, and with our brethren, then, if only this

can be! Life hangs as nothing in the scale against dear

Liberty!

Though hearts be torn asunder, for freedom we

will fight : Our blood may seal the victory, but God will shield the right!

LUCY LARCOM.

THE STRIPES AND THE STARS.

O STAR-SPANGLED BANNER! the flag of our pride! Though trampled by traitors and basely defied, Fling out to the glad winds your red, white, and

blue, For the heart of the Northland is beating for you! And her strong arm is nerving to strike with a will, Till the foe and his boastings are humbled and still! Here's welcome to wounding and combat and scars And the glory of death—for the Stripes and the

Stars! From prairie, O ploughman! speed boldly awayThere's seed to be sown in God's furrows to-day! Row landward, lone fisher ! stout woodman, come

home! Let smith leave his anvil and weaver his loom, And hamlet and city ring loud with the cry: “For God and our country we'll fight till we die ! Here's welcome to wounding and combat and scars And the glory of death-for the Stripes and the

Stars!” Invincible banner! the flag of the free, Oh, where treads the foot that would falter for thee? Or the hands to be folded, till triumph is won And the eagle looks proud, as of old, to the sun ? Give tears for the parting--a murmur of prayerThen forward! the fame of our standard to

share !

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