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As the shades of evening close,
Beck’ning thee to long repose;
As life itself becomes disease,
Seek the chimney-neuk of ease;
There ruminate with sober thought,
On all thou'st seen, and heard, and wrought.
And teach the sportive younkers round,
Laws of experience, sage and sound.
Say, Man's true, genuine estimate,
The grand criterion of his fate,
Is not, Art thou high or low?
Did thy fortune ebb or flow?
Did many talents gild thy span?
Or frugal nature grudge thee one ?
Tell them, and press it on their mind,
As thou thyself must shortly find,
The smile or frown of awful Heav'n
To virtue or to vice is giv'n.
Say, to be just, and kind, and wise,
There solid self-enjoyment lies;
That foolish, selfish, faithless ways,
Lead to the wretched, vile, and base.

Thus resign'd and quiet, creep
To the bed of lasting sleep;
Sleep, whence thou shalt ne'er awake
Night where dawn shall never break,
Till future life, future no more,
To light and joy the good restore,
To light and joy unknown before!

Stranger, go! Heaven be thy guide
Quod the Beadsman of Nith-side

A PRAYER,

ONDER THE PRESSURE OF VIOLENTANGUISA,

O Thou great Being! what thou art

Surpasses me to know;
Yet sure I am, that known to Thee

Are all thy works below.

Thy creature here before Thee stands,

All wretched and distrest;
Yet sure those ills that wring my soul

Obey thy high behest.

Sure Thou, Almighty, canst not act

From cruelty or wrath !
O, free my weary eyes from tears,

Or, close them fast in death!

But if I must afflicted be,

To suit some wise design;
Then man my soul with firm resolves

To bear and not repine !

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BURNS'S POEMS.

A PRAYER,

IN THE PROSPECT OF DEATL.

O thou, unknown, Almighty Cause

Of all my hope and fear!
In whose dread presence, ere an hour,

Perhaps I must appear!

If I have wander'd in those paths

Of life I ought to shun;
As something, loudly in my breast,

Remonstrates I have done ;-

Thou know'st that Thou hast formed me

With passions wild and strong ;
And list’ning to their witching voice

Has often led me wrong.

Where human weakness has come short,

Or frailty stept aside,
Do Thou, All Good ! -- for such Thou art,

In shades of darkness hide.

Where with intention I have err'd,

No other plea I have,
But, Thou art good! and goodness still

Delighteth to forgive'

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Why am I loth to leave this earthly scene?

Have I so found it full of pleasing charms ? Somu drops of joy with draughts of ill between;

Some gleams of sunshine 'mid renewing storms
Is it departing pangs my soul alarms ?

Or death's unlovely, dreary, dark abode ?
For guilt, for guilt! my terrors are in arms !

I tremble to approach an angry God,
And justly smart beneath his sin-avenging rod.

II.

Fain would I say, “Forgive my foul offence in

Fain promise never more to disobey :
But, should my Author health again dispense,

Again I might desert fair virtue's way:
Again in folly's path might go astray;

Again exalt the brute, and sink the man;
Thon how should I for heav'nly mercy pray,

Who act so counter heav'nly mercy's plan?
Who sin so oft have mourn'd, yet to temptation ran?

III.

0 Thou, great Governor of all below,

If I may dare a lifted eye to Thee,
Thy nod can make the tempest cease to blow,
Or still the tumult of the raging sea;

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With that controlling pow'r assist ev'n me,

Those headlong, furious passions to confine;
For all unfit I feel my pow'rs to be,

To rule their torrent in th' allowed line;
0, aid me with thy help, Vranipotence divine !

VERSES,

LEFT BY THE AUTHOR AT A REVEREND FRIEND'S HOLSE

IN THE ROOM WHERE HE SLEPT.

I.

O THU, dread Pow'r, who reign’st above;

I know thou wilt me hear,
When, for this scene of peace and love

I make my pray’r sincere.

II.

The hoary sire, the pytal stroke,

Long, long, be pleaw'd to spare !
To bless his little filial flock,

And show what good men are.

III.

She, who her lovely effspring eyes

With tender hopes and fears,
O bless her with a mother's joys,

But spare a mother': tears!

IV.

Their hope, their stay, their derling Fotb

In manhood's dawnis * blyth;

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