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law,” requires in substance monthly reports of accidents to passengers and to employees actually on duty, but does not require any reports of accidents to other persons. This results in a duplication of reports as to certain classes of accidents, but does not secure complete and reliable returns as to other accidents.

We recommend that the act of 1901 be so amended that the monthly reports thereby required shall include accidents of every kind and to all classes of persons, the form of such reports to be regulated by the Commission. The matter of accidents could then be omitted in the annual reports, since the whole subject would be covered by the monthly reports. This would at once simplify the law and give greater value to our accident statistics.

RELATIONS WITH DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.

The most cordial relations continue between the Commission and the Department of Justice. Under the scheme of regulation provided by the present law, the orders of the Commission respecting rates and kindred matters, if not complied with by the carriers, must be enforced by proceedings in the Federal courts conducted by the several United States attorneys under the direction of the Attorney-General. All criminal prosecutions under the act must be undertaken and carried on by the same officials. Upon their efforts and efficiency the successful administration of the regulating statute is largely dependent. It gives us pleasure to say that the Department responds promptly to the requests of the Commission in both classes of cases, and that the various proceedings instituted to enforce the law are conducted with commendable vigor and ability.

COMPLAINTS BEFORE THE COMMISSION.

Since the eighteenth annual report of the Commission was submitted to Congress 568 complaints have ben filed with the Commission for consideration and action. These cases include both formal and informal complaints, as well as proceedings and investigations instituted by the Commission upon its own motion. The number of formal cases and investigations instituted during the year is 65, and these involve directly the rates and practices of 321 carriers. Following is a brief statement of complaints in formal proceedings docketed during the year and the provisions of the law claimed to be violated:

No.790. Greater rates on sugar for the shorter distance from New Orleans to Wichita, Kans., than for the longer distance to Kansas City and St. Joseph, Mo., Omaha, Nebr., and Sioux City, Iowa. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 791. Greater rates on oak lumber in carloads for the shorter distance from Afton and Gordonsville, Va., and points between, including Cobham and Crozet, to Philadelphia, Pa., than for the longer distance from Staunton and Basic City, Va., also a higher rate on lumber from Lowmoor, Va., and Ronceverte, W. Va., to Germantown Junction than to Philadelphia, Pa. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 792. Unreasonable and prejudicial rates on plate glass over 80 united inches in dimension, shipped from Pittsburg, Pa., and other points to Chicago and other western points, and New York and other eastern points, as compared with the rate on plate glass of foreign manufacture transported from North Atlantic ports to Chicago, Cincinnati, St. Louis, and other points. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 793. Unreasonable rate on cotton waste in compressed bales as compared with rates on like commodity in uncompressed bales. Section 1.

No. 794. Unreasonable and prejudicial rates on green apples from Siloam Springs, Ark., to Houston, Tex. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 795. Unreasonable and unjust classification of elastic bookcases knocked down and shipped in packages from Cincinnati, Ohio., to points in official classification territory. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 796. Unreasonable and discriminating rates on petroleum and its products from Pittsburg, Pa., to Watertown, Conn. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 797. Unreasonable and discriminating rates on wooden ware, including pails, tubs, kegs, and kits, in carloads from points in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Missouri, and Michigan to North Pacific coast terminal points, as compared with the rates in the opposite direction. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 798. Excessive rate on oyster shells 'in carloads from Biloxi, Miss., to Peoria, Ill. Reparation claimed. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 799. Unreasonable and prejudicial rates on pails from Cincinnati, Ohio, to Albany and Dublin, Ga., Montgomery, Ala., and other southern points via Chattanooga, Tenn. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 800. Discrimination in passenger fare from St. Paul and other Minnesota points to Gardiner, Mont., and points in the Yellowstone National Park, and failure to post and publish tariff. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 6, and section 1 of act of February 19, 1903.

No. 801. Greater rate on coal in carloads from Centerville and points in Centerville coal district in Iowa for the shorter distance to Albany, Mo., than for the longer distance to St. Joseph, Mo. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 802. Unreasonable and discriminating rates on iron beds and brass beds in carloads from Marion, Ind., to Highpoint, N. C., as compared with the rates in the opposite direction. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 803. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on corn and corn products from Missouri River points to points in Louisiana.

No. 804. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on corn and corn products from Missouri River points to points in Texas.

No. 805. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on corn and corn products from Missouri River points to points in Washington, Oregon, and California.

No. 806. Unreasonable and prejudicial rates on petroleum and its products from points in Pennsylvania and Ohio to points in Rhode Island and Connecticut. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 807. Unreasonable rates on grain from Uniontown and Morganfield, Ky., to Atlanta, Ga., as compared with rates from other Ohio River points. Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6.

No. 808. Unreasonable passenger fare from Seligman, Mo., to Beaver, Ark. Section 1.

No. 809. Refusal to furnish cars at Cavett, Ohio, for transportation of hay: Reparation claimed. Section 3.

No. 810. Excessive and discriminating rate on carload shipment of steam boilers from Syracuse, N. Y., to Atlanta, Ga. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 811. Unreasonable and discriminating rate on hay from East St. Louis, Ill., to New Orleans, La., when reconsigned from any point. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 812. Refusal to build siding or switch connection for the loading of coal at points between Buckhannon and western West Virginia. Section 3.

No. 813. Unreasonable passenger fare from Ellenton and Jackson, S. C., to Augusta, Ga. Section 1.

No. 814. Unreasonable and prejudicial rates on electrical instruments and fixtures known as Scheidel's coil outfit” from Chicago, Ill., to Fall River, Mass. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 815. Unreasonable and discriminating rates on plate glass in carloads from Chicago, Pittsburg, Kokomo, and East St. Louis to Minneapolis, Minn., as compared with the rates from Antwerp, Belgium, to Chicago and Minneapolis. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 816. Excessive and discriminating through passenger fare from Fernandina, Fla., to Savannah, Ga., as compared with the sum of the locals. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 817. Unreasonable and prejudicial rates on electrical instruments and fixtures known as Scheidel's coil outfit” from Chicago to Salt Lake City, Utah. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3. · No. 818. Greater rate on butter, eggs, cheese, dressed poultry, wheat, corn, flour, and coal from Kansas City and Chicago for the shorter distance to Santa Barbara, Cal., than for the longer distance to Marysville, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego, known as Pacific coast terminals. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 819. Greater rate on coal, corn, flour, and canned goods from Kansas City, St. Louis, and Chicago for the shorter distance to San Buena Ventura than for the longer distance to Marysville, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego, known as Pacific coast terminals. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 820. Discrimination in rates against San Francisco and in favor of other Pacific coast terminals on all west-bound freight. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 821. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of alleged unlawful preferences by the Wabash Railroad Company between consignees of freight in St. Louis, Mo.

No. 822. Discrimination in rates on petroleum in tank cars or barrels, carloads, from New Orleans to Chicago and Cincinnati. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 823. Unreasonable and unjust increase in rates on cattle, sheep, and hogs in carload lots from points on line of defendant roads to points in New York, Massachusetts, and other Eastern States, excepting from said increase such points as Cairo, East Cape Girardeau, East St. Louis, Gale, Pekin, Alton, Peoria, and Evansville, on freight originating beyond. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 824. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of elevator allowances.

No. 825. Unreasonable and discriminating rates on glass bottles, not otherwise specified, in carloads from Terre Haute, Ind., to Dayton and Toledo, Ohio, Peoria and Joliett, ill., Grand Rapids, Mich., and other points, as compared with the rates to the larger markets, such as Chicago, Milwaukee, East St. Louis, and Louisville. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 826. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rates on iron articles from Atlantic seaboard points to western destinations.

No. 827. Unreasonable and prejudicial transportation charges on lumber loaded on flat or gondola cars because of the expense attached to staking such cars under the rules of the Master Car Builders' Association. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 828. Unreasonable and prejudicial transportation charges on lumber loaded on flat or gondola cars because of the expense attached to staking such cars under the rules of the Master Car Builders' Association. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 829. Discrimination in delivery of dressed beef and pork products consigned to the Canal street yard in Providence, R. I. Sections 2 and 3.

No. 830. Greater rate on scrap iron shipped to St. Louis, Mo., Chicago, Ill., and East St. Louis, Ill., for the shorter distance from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, than for the longer distance from St. Paul and Minneapolis. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 831. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of charges for the refrigeration of fruits and vegetables shipped from points in Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina to New York and other northeastern markets over the Central of Georgia Railway, the Southern Railway, the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, the Seaboard Air Line Railway, and the Pennsylvania Railroad.

No. 832. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of charges over the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway and connecting roads for the refrigeration of fruit and vegetables from points in California.

No. 833. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of charges over the Kansas City Southern Railway and connecting roads for the refrigeration of fruit and vegetables from points in Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.

No. 834. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of charges over the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad and connecting roads for the refrigeration of fruit and vegetables from points in Missouri, Arkansas, Indian Territory, and Texas.

No. 835. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of charges over the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railway and connecting roads for the refrigeration of fruit and vegetables from points in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas.

No. 836. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of charges over the Southern Pacific Railway and connecting roads for the refrigeration of fruit and vegetables from points in California.

No. 837. Unreasonable and discriminating rates on wheat in carloads from Oklahoma City, Okla., to Fort Worth and Gainesville, Tex., as compared with the rate to Kansas City, St. Louis, and Chicago. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 838. Discrimination in rates on dressed poultry in barrels, ice packed, from Thompsonville, Ill., to New York. Reparation claimed. Sections 2 and 3.

No. 839. Unjust and discriminating rates on potaces and wheat in carloads from Gwinner, N. Dak., to Superior, Wis., as compared with the rates from Lisbon to Leeds, N. Dak. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 840. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of the increase in the minimum percentage of cars in any train required to be operated with power or train brakes.

No. 841. Unreasonable and discriminating rates on wire screen doors and windows in carloads from Fenton, Mich., to Winooski, Vt., Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, as compared with the rates from Winooski to Detroit, Mich., Chicago, Ill., Milwaukee, Wis., and East St. Louis, Ill. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 842. Unjust classification of leather scraps in carloads shipped in rolls, bundles, or boxes, or loose, from Chicago and St. Louis to New York. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

H. Doc. 195, 59-1-2

No. 843. Unjust and discriminating rates on petroleum and its products from Warren, Titusville, Oil City, and Pittsburg, Pa., to Peoria, Ill. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 844. Unjust and discriminating rates on petroleum oil in barrels, half barrels, cases, and half cases in less than carload quantities from points in the States of Iowa and Nebraska to points in the States of Minnesota, Kansas, North and South Dakota, and other States. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 845. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of charges for the transportation of wool from points in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and Nevada to points east of the Mississippi River.

No. 846. Greater freight rates from points east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio rivers, known as Trunk Line and Central Freight Association territories, for the shorter distance to Owensboro and Henderson, Ky., than for the longer distance to Evansville, Ind. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 847. Greater rates on wheat, barley, rye, and other small grain for the shorter distance from Pine Island, Minn., to Chicago, Ill., than for the longer distance from Redwing, Minn., to Chicago. Sections 2, 3, and 4.

No. 848. Investigation by the Commission in the matter of rebates upon shipments of forest products transported by the Suffolk & Carolina Railway Company from points in the State of North Carolina to points in the State of Virginia.

No. 849. Unjust classification of mixed carload shipments of paper and paper bags from Baltimore, Md., to points in southern classification territory. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 850. Unjust classification of roller letter copiers as compared with copying presses. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 851. Unreasonable rates on wool in the grease from Philadelphia, Pa., to Fort Wayne, Ind., as compared with rates in the opposite direction. Reparation claimed. Sections 1 and 3.

No. 852. Failure to furnish cars at Grover Hill, Ohio, for interstate shipments of hay and other produce. Reparation claimed. Section 3.

No. 853. Discrimination in the matter of differentials against Amarillo, Tex., as against other Texas common points. Sections 1, 2, and 3.

No. 854. Unreasonable charge on two carload shipments of lumber from Rockland, Tex., to Tampico, Mexico. Reparation claimed. Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4.

HEARINGS AND INVESTIGATIONS.

Seventy-nine hearings and investigations of alleged violations of the act to regulate commerce have been had at general sessions of the Commission at its office in Washington, D. C., and at special sessions held in Chicago, Ill. ; Pittsburg and Philadelphia, Pa.; St. Louis and Kansas City, Mo.; Texarkana and Little Rock, Ark.; Augusta and Atlanta, Ga.; Cincinnati and Cleveland, Ohio; Indianapolis and Terre Haute, Ind.; Birmingham, Ala.; Louisville, Ky.; Detroit, Mich.; Boston, Mass., and Providence, R. I. The formal proceedings so heard and investigated involve the following matters:

Rates and practices in the transportation of coal and mine supplies by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company. Rates on sugar from New Orleans, La., to Wichita, Kans. Differential freight rates to and from North Atlantic ports. Rates on anthracite coal in

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