History of Europe from the Fall of Napoleon in 1815 to the Accession of Louis Napoleon in 1852, Том 5

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W. Blackwood, 1856
 

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Universal education of the people
9
Anomalous result of education on crime
10
Statistics of education and crime in Austria
11
Seeds of discontent arising out of this very prosperity
12
Manner in which this was brought about
13
Universal expectation of liberal institutions which prevailed in Germany
14
His versatility has rendered him rather universally popular than
15
after the peace 15 Evidence from public acts of the promise to give Germany constitutional government 16 Delay in performing these promises on t...
16
States established in Hanover Würtemberg and Baden but not
17
Tardy promises of the Prussian government
18
Important resolution of the Diet regarding the internal affairs
19
20 Great effect of these provisions
20
Effect of the Spanish and Italian revolutions of 1819 and 1820 on many
21
Resolution of the Diet on the propositions of Austria
22
Supreme Austregal Court
23
Assassination of Kotzebue
24
His execution and immense sensation it created
25
Consequences of this event highly injurious to freedom
26
2729 Circular of the cabinet of Berlin 2729
27
Treaty between the Porte and Mehemet Ali
28
Treaty of UnkiarSkelessi
29
Reflections on this picture of Germany
30
Circular of Metternich detailing the effect of the repressive measures
31
Circular of Metternich on the Neapolitan revolution 33 Final Act of Confederation
32
VOL V
33
Effect of this Final Act on German liberty
34
Illusory edict of Prussia regarding provincial diets
35
Refusal of the Diet to sanction the demand of Holstein for a consti tution
36
Import of the constitution of the provincial estates of Prussia by the edict of June 5 1823
37
Count Bernstorffs circular on the subject
38
Regulations against the secret societies in Prussia
39
The real worth of the provincial estates
40
Causes which prevented an outbreak
41
Wisdom of the internal government of Prussia
42
Specific measures introduced
43
The ultimate effect of these changes would have favoured freedom
44
Great effect of the French Revolution in checking German freedom
45
Increase of this feeling with the Belgian and Polish revolutions
46
Effect of the siege of Antwerp in 1832
48
Decree of July 5 of the Diet
49
Immense sensation produced by these decrees over Europe
50
Riot in Frankfort and its occupation by the Austrians
51
Congress of Sovereigns at Münchengratz
52
Fresh riot at Frankfort which is put under martial law
53
Decrees of 1835 in the Diet
54
Death of the Emperor Francis and his successors communication to the Diet
55
Change in the public mind in Germany towards material objects
56
Refusal of the Diet to restore the constitution of Hanover
57
Dispute between the Prussian government and the Pope regarding the Archbishop of Cologne
58
Immense sensation excited by this event
59
Wise internal regulations of the Prussian government 61 Amnesty on the 300th anniversary of the Reformation and treaty of reciprocity with Holland
60
Adjustment of the dispute with the See of Rome
64
in intellectual strength
65
Extension of the Zollverein and increasing intellectual strength
66
Vast system of railways in Northern Germany
67
Inauguration of the Cathedral of Cologne and Kings speech at
68
Meeting of the general estates at Berlin
69
Secret views of the government in this step
70
Successes of the troops
71
Progress of constitutional ideas in 1943
72
Important religious movement in Germany in 1845
73
Deputation of the Chamber to the King
74
Answer of the King and Paris declared in a state of siege
75
Progress in 1847 and convocation of a general diet
77
Opening of the States General of Prussia and Kings speech
78
Extraordinary political situation of Germany
79
Effect of the Revolutionary War on the two parties which divided
80
And in increasing the passion for freedom
81
Great effect of general education in increasing this desire
82
Great difficulties arising from the want of foreign commercial colonies
83
constitution of the Diet the Federal Union
84
Effect of the preponderance of Catholics in the Confederacy
85
The army is the expression of general opinion
86
Influence of Russia on Prussia and the lesser states
87
Influence of the want of employment in forcing men to become govern ment employés
88
Description of the citadel of Antwerp
89
Disastrous effects in Germany of the revolutions of 1820 and 1830
90
The triumph of the Conservatives left the seeds of revolution in all the European states
91
Influence of these causes on German literature
92
Advantages of the German Confederacy to the peace of Europe
93
Effect of the German Confederacy on domestic peace and the progress of freedom
94
What of a federal union for the interests of mankind
95
What may be hoped for federal unions in future 97 Cause which shipwrecked German liberty 87 CHAPTER XXVIII
96
Abandonment of the Barrier treaty
97
Great addition to the power of France by these events
98
And of Russia
99
Influence on Englands power
100
Great importance of the German literature in the early part of the nine teenth century 2 Literature is thus the index to general opinion 3 Cause of its r...
101
Wieland 9 His defects and excellencies 10 Goethe
102
Faust
105
Character of his dramas
110
His elevated picture of love
117
Körner as a dramatic poet
124
its character
131
50
137
German autobiographies
144
Frederick Schlegel 66 Jacobi
151
68
153
its origin 68 Reaction against these doctrines rationalism 69 Strausss Life of Jesus Christ
154
The alarm thence arising is unfounded 71 Reflections on German literature 72 General character of German literature 73 Its romantic and sentimental...
158
Object of the fine arts in Germany 75 Thorwaldsen
160
Danneker and Kiss
161
Painting in Germany
162
Its romantic character 79 German architecture 80 General passion for music in Germany 81 Beethoven
164
Mozart
165
Haydn
166
Handel 85 Mendelssohn
167
Spohr and Glück 87 Reflections on the influence of recent disasters on the German mind
168
FRANCE FROM THE EXTINCTION OF THE HEREDITARY PEERAGE IN DECEMBER 1831 TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MILITARY GOV...
170
Social dangers of the Government of France
171
Louis Blancs picture of the working classes in France at this period
172
The Revolution was not the cause of these evils but it aggravated them
175
Commencement of the insurrection
179
The insurrection spreads and proves successful 12 Half the national guard join the insurgents who make the prefect prisoner
180
Desperate strife in the streets of Lyons
181
Extreme alarm at Paris and vigorous measures of the Government
182
Renewed efforts of the Republicans Armand Carrel
186
his character
187
Strength of the republican press and extravagance of the Court
188
Extravagance of the Civil List
189
Great increase of the general expenditure
190
Conspiracy of Notre Dame and the Rue Prouvaires
191
Conspiracy at Grenoble
192
Expedition to Ancona resolved on and its reasons
193
State of affairs in Italy
194
Disturbances in Romagna and Austrian interference
195
Effects of this stroke in Italy and Europe
197
First appearance of the cholera in Paris
198
Its extraordinary and unlookedfor symptoms
199
Uncertainty in its mode of treatment
200
Commissions in Paris on the subject
201
Real ravages of the epidemic
202
Noble instances of fortitude and benevolence
203
Death of Casimir Périer and Cuvier
205
Character of Casimir Périer
206
Attempt of the Duchess de Berri to raise the west
207
The Duchess de Berri determines on an effort in France and repairs Massa
208
She leaves Massa and makes a descent on France ib 42 Landing of the Princess
210
Abortive rising at Marseilles ib 44 The Duchess resolves to cross France to La Vendée
211
She escapes into La Vendée
212
Disquietude and measures of the Royalists at these events
213
Vain attempt at an insurrection
215
The Princess resolves on a rising which proves abortive ib 49 Incidents of the civil war
216
Adventures of the Duchess de Berri and extinction of the insurrection
217
The Princess takes refuge in Nantes
218
When she is at length discovered
219
Treachery of Deutz towards the Princess
220
Her arrest
221
Her imprisonment in the chateau of Blaye ib 56 Extreme discontent and democratic movement in Paris
222
Death of General Lamarque
223
His funeral and commencement of the insurrection
224
Preparations of the Government
225
6061 Commencement of the insurrection 226227
226
The insurrection breaks out
228
Vigorous measures on the part of the Government
229
Mysterious meeting at Lafittes at night
230
Progress and alarming aspect of the insurrection
231
Moral chances on either side ib 67 Measures and forces of the Government
232
Marshal Soults military measures
233
507
234
Great successes of the insurgents and consternation of the military chiefs
235
251
246
254
247
260
260
subjected
264
CHAPTER XXX
268
Force and corruption the principle of the Government 3 General policy of the Government 4 Its danger in the end
271
Income and expenditure of 1833
287
Congress of MuntzGraetz between Russia Prussia and Austria
293
Results of the Revolution of July
327
Change for the worse which it had induced ib 61 Error of the explanation of these changes given by the Liberal party
328
How the Revolution of July failed
329
Schism between the proprietors and prolétaires
330
CHAPTER XXXI
332
Assault on the Duke of Wellington and the King
333
Immense power at the disposal of Ministers
334
Influence of the practical turn of the English mind at this crisis
335
The nobility were at the head of the English movement
336
Effect of the Conservatives remaining at their posts
337
Moderation of Government
338
Beneficial effect of the influence in Ireland of the See of Rome at this period i
339
Influence of the cholera in checking the Reform mania
340
Distressed state of the finances
341
Journey of the Duke of Orléans through the south of France 268
343
Distracted state of Ireland and resistance to tithes
344
Declaration of Government on the subject and recommendations of 345 14 Reflections on their recommendation ib the committee
345
1516 Valuable facts brought out in the evidence and the debate 346347
346
Government plan on the subject and Mr OConnells opposition
347
Increased agitation and violence in the country
348
Frightful murders and burnings in the country hy
349
Ineffectual efforts of the Government
350
Renewed efforts of the agitators and their gross falsehoods
351
104
352
Speech of the King on proroguing Parliament
353
Success of the registration of electors law
354
System of requiring pledges from candidates
355
Result of the new elections
357
Opening of Parliament
358
Extreme wordiness of the new House and new regulations in conse quence
359
Regulations for forenoon hours in the House of Commons
360
Coercion Bill for Ireland
361
3135 Argument of Ministers for the Coercion Bill 362366
362
3641 Argument of the Roman Catholics against the bill 367371
367
270
372
Reflections on the Coercion Act
373
Reflections on these bills
382
271
388
Rapid decline in the popularity of Ministers
394
feeling of the country on
400
105
405
The West India Question
406
Prosperous general condition of the negroes
412
Insurrection in Jamaica
418
Result of the debate and parties by whom it was opposed
426
Causes which had rendered the duty bearable during the war
430
What made the West India proprietors acquiesce in the change
431
Fatal effects of the measure on the West India Islands
432
272
433
Ruinous effects of emancipation to the negroes
434
106
435
107
436
Reflections on this subject
437
Bill regarding the shortening of infant labour in factories
438
Closing of the session and review of its proceedings
439
Improved state of the commercial interests and continued depression of land
440
Difficulties of Ministers from the Irish members and Radicals
442
Commencement of the agitation for the Repeal of the Union ib 115 First move in this direction Attack on Baron Smith
443
116120 Mr OConnells argument for the repeal of the Union 444446
444
121124 Answer of Mr Spring Rice 447450
447
Result of the debate
451
273
452
Divisions of the Government on the Irish Church Question
454
Resignation of Mr Stanley Sir James Graham the Duke of Richmond and Lord Ripon
455
Effects of this secession upon the Government
456
Kings declaration on the Irish Church
457
Ministers hold on
458
The movement party resolve to force on Mr Wards motion
459
Question brought before the House of Lords
460
Effect of these declarations on the part of Government
461
its progress
462
Which is opposed by all parties
463
Division in the Cabinet on the Irish Coercion Bill renewal
464
Negotiation of Mr Littleton with Mr OConnell
465
140
466
Earl Greys parting address as Minister
467
Lord Melbourne appointed Prime Minister and changes in the Cabinet
468
Modified Coercion Bill
469
Fate of the Irish Church Bill
470
PoorLaw Amendment Bill
472
Vast effect of the contraction of the currency on this matter
473
Report of the PoorLaw Commissioners recommending a change
475
The bill is carried by a great majority
478
Farther progress of the bill ib 153 Regulation as to separating husband and wife
480
Effect of the bill has not been materially to lessen poorrates
481
Prorogation of Parliament
482
Who is soon overturned
523
408
525
Great successes of the popular opposition in Greece and overthrow of the Government
526
7 Arrival of King Otho and joy of the inhabitants
527
Institutions and military force of the infant State
528
Causes of discord still remaining in the East
529
Jealousy awakened in the English Cabinet
530
Divergence of views on the Eastern Question between the Cabinets of London and Paris
531
Causes of the coldness of France and England Commercial treaty be tween the latter and Turkey
532
And with Austria
533
Increasing coldness of the Porte with France ib 45 Mutual recriminations of the Porte and Mehemet Ali
534
Efforts of France and England to avert hostilities
535
Commencement of hostilities by the Sultan
536
Forces on both sides at the commencement of hostilities
537
Battle of Nezib
538
The Turkish fleet is treacherously given up to the Egyptians
539
Revolution in Serria
542
Views of the European Powers at this juncture
543
Ultimate demands of both parties
544
Treaty of July 15 1840 for the settlement of the East
545
The Pacha refuses the terms and military arrangements of the Allies to enforce it
546
Conciliatory note of the allied Powers towards France
547
Extreme irritation in France
548
Imminent danger of a rupture between England and France
549
Allied plan of attack and forces on opposite side
551
Nature of Syria in a military point of view
552
Effect of this peculiar physical conformation on the war then waged 65 Bombardment of Beyrout
553
Immense sensation produced by this event over Europe
554
63 Conference of Louis Philippe and M Guizot at the Chateau dEu and its results
555
Thiers pote of Nov 8 and its results
557
Fall of M Thiers who is succeeded by M Guizot
558
The British fleet steers for Acre and gains great successes
559
Bombardment of Acre
562
Submission of Mehemet Ali to the terms of the Allies 75 Terms of final pacification proposed by M Guizot and accepted by the Allies
564
Important treaty of the whole European Powers regarding the navigation of the Dardanelles and Bosphorus
565
The advantages of the treaty were more apparent than real
566
The refusal of succour to the Turks in 1833 was the fatal step
567
Which arose from the Reform Bill and the contraction of the currency
568
Dangers of the nation in 1841 from the mania for reduction
569
CHAPTER XXXIII
571
Opening of the Chamber and great majority for Ministers
572
Marshal Gérard succeeds Marshal Soult
573
Declaration of the new Ministers in favour of economy
574
Count Molé Minister
575
Fall of the new Ministry and restoration of the old one
576
Flourishing state of Algiers ib 8 First debate on the Address
577
Answer of M Guizot
578
Majority for Ministers in the Chamber
579
Marshal Mortier is succeeded by the Duke de Broglie as Prime Minister
580
Cause of this crisis
581
Character of the Duke de Broglie
582
Commencement of the trial and contest with the Bar
587
Ruinous effects of this mode of proceeding
589
Commencement of the proceedings 21 Refusal of the accused to plead or answer until they got their own defenders
590
Progress of the trial
591
Continuation of the disorders and letter of Audry de Puyraveau
592
Proceedings in the Chamber of Deputies
593
Trials disjoined and escape of twentyeight prisoners
594
Conclusion of the trials
595
2728 Reflections on these trials 596597
596
Fête of July and conspiracy to murder the King
598
Attempted assassination of the King by Fieschi
599
Arrest of the assassin and discovery of the infernal machine
600
Immense effect produced by this event in Paris
601
Funeral of Marshal Mortier and the other victims
602
Trial and execution of the murderers
603
3538 Speech of M de Broglie on the introduction of the new law of re pression 604607
604
3942 Answer of M Armand Carrel and M de Lamartine 608610
608
Proposed laws
610
Which pass both Chambers
612
Improved condition of the Government in spring 1836 ib 46 Increased prosperity in France and beginning of the railway mania
613
Declaration of M Guizot
624
Occupation of Cracow by the allied Powers
630
The Spanish Question and its urgent davgers
637
Preparations for the attempt of Strasburg
643
Humane conduct of the Government to Louis Napoleon
649
Modification of the Ministry
655
Dissolution of the Chamber
661
His first successes
668
Faults of the French Government after the Revolution
671
Commencement of the expedition
674
Diverging views of Generals Damremont and Bugeaud on them
680
Reason of the rigour of revolutionary governments
687

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Стр. 324 - deceitful above all things and desperately wicked...
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Стр. 167 - Three poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed, The next in majesty, in both the last. The force of Nature could no farther go ; To make a third she joined the former two.
Стр. 545 - ... shall, at the same time, place in the hands of that Agent the necessary instructions to the Commanders of his sea and land forces, to withdraw immediately from Arabia, and from all the Holy Cities which are therein situated; from the Island of Candia; from the district of Adana ; and from...
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