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COMMISSION ON COMMUNICATIONS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 1929

UNITED STATES SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE COMMERCE,

Washington, D. C. The committee met, pursuant to adjournment on yesterday, in room 412, Senate Office Building, Senator James Couzens presiding.

Present: Senators Couzens (chairman), Pine, Brookhart, Glenn, Kean, Dill, Wheeler, and Wagner.

The CHAIRMAN. The committee will come to order, please. Mr. Shoup, of the Department of Commerce, is with us this morning. Will you please give your full name and your position?

STATEMENT OF G. STANLEY SHOUP, CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS

SECTION, TRANSPORTATION DIVISION DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Mr. SHOUP. According to figures compiled from the list of submarine cables of the world, twelfth edition, December, 1928, published by the International Bureau of the Telegraph Union at Berne, the total mileage of the world's cables is 361,631.4 nautical miles. Of this amount, 55,764.5 nautical miles are operated by government administrations, 5,473.6 miles consist of German cables not yet apportioned, and 300,393.3 miles are operated by private companies. Now, of this mileage for private companies, 168,193.4 miles belong to British companies, 93,203.1 (of total American about 17,482 miles are owned by British companies but operated by American companies) miles to American companies, 18,414.4 miles to French companies, 9,937.3 to Italian companies, 8,416.4 to Danish companies, and 2,144.7 miles to German companies.

In connection with the above figures I might say that the total mileage given for British companies, namely, 168,193.4, including nearly 25,000 miles which, although for the immediate present are operated by the Pacific Cable Board, and the British Post Office, are soon to be operated by the British cable-radio merger, and for that reason they have been listed under private companies rather than government administrations.

Beginning with the nineteenth century there were numerous experiments conducted in underwater telegraphy. Probably the first in the United States was that made by Morse in 1842 in New York Harbor when he sent electrical impulses through an insulated copper wire. It is also related that in 1845 Ezra Cornell laid a 12-mile cable in the Hudson River, connecting Fort Lee and New York, which worked for several months.

Senator Dill. Does the British Government have any cables of its own?

51014—29-PT 9 -7

Mr. SHOUP. Yes; cables operated by the Pacific Cable Board. The British Government is interested in that to the extent of fiveeighteenths, Canada five-eighteenths, Australia six-eighteenths, and New Zealand two-eighteenths.

Senator Dill. How many miles of cables have they?
Mr. SHOUP. Twenty-five thousand miles.

Senator Dill. That is not included in the 163,000 miles you referred to?

Mr. Shoup. Yes; it is.
Senator Dill. You said 163,000 miles privately owned.

Mr. SHOUP. These 25,000 miles for the immediate present are not operated by the Government, but they will be taken over by the cable-radio merger. It also includes one of the trans-Atlantic cables.

Senator Dill. What Governments operate purely governmentowned cables?

Mr. Shoup. I might say, Senator Dill, that I have here a list of all the cables in the world. For those operated by government administrations they have not a detailed list, but they have a summary of the number of cables, number of conductors, and number of nautical miles for each country. But for private companies I have a detailed list of all cables for the purpose of the record.

Senator Dill. I think that ought to be put in the record.
Mr. Shop. I think so too.

(The list furnished by Mr. Shoup of the submarine cables of the world, is here made a part of the record, as follows:)

Submarine cables of the world [Compiled from the List of Submarine Cables of the World, published by the International Bureau of the

Telegraph Union, Berne, December, 1928, twelfth edition)
A. GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATIONS (SUMMARY)

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Alaska.

7

7

2,084.0 Argentina

8
21

7.5 Australia.

15

20 Belgium.

6

50 1 301.3 Brazil.

7

13 British India

14

17

2,339.7 Canada.

10

14

130. 1 China.

11

12 22,115,5 Cyrenaica.

1

1

415.7 Denmark and Faroe Islands

96

785 1483.4 Dutch East Indies.

27 6, 167.0 Egypt.

1

* 191.7 Estonia.

35 $190.0 Fiji Islands.

11.5 France.

96

187 • 14.813.0 Germany.

103

665 : 2, 9916 Great Britain and Ireland.

121

62,906. 1 1 All cable in common with Great Britain. 2 957.9 miles operated by Eastern Extension, Australasia and China Telegraph Co. and Great Northern Telegraph Co. 634 miles jointly owned by China and Japan.

3 39.3 miles jointly owned by Denmark and Sweden; 67.4 miles jointly owned by Denmark and Norway.

* Property of the Governments of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and Kingdom of the Hedjaz but operated by the Eastern Telegraph Co.

5 71.8 miles jointly owned between Estonia and Finland 17.3 miles jointly owned between Estonia and Latvia.

6 531.7 miles jointly owned between Great Britain and France.

7 of the total miles given, the following mileage is jointly owned between Germany and the countries mentioned: Free City of Danzig, 4.4; Sweden, 255,6; Denmark, 71.1; Norway, 601.4; Switzerland, 35.8; Great Britain, 927.5; jointly between the Eastern Telegraph Co.; and German Atlantic Telegraph Co., 17.8.

583.6 miles jointly owned by Great Britain and the Netherlands; 686.1 miles jointly owned by Great Britain and Norway.

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African Direct Telegraph Co., Electra House, Moorgate, London, E. C. 2 St. Vincent, Cape Verde Islands, to Sao Thiago, Cape Verde Islands.

1884

203.9 Sao Thiago, Cape Verde Islands, to Bathurst, Gambia.

1886

468. 2 Bathurst, Gambia, to Sierra Leone..

1886

485.9 Sierra Leone, to Accra, Gold Coast.

1886, 1914 1,057.8 Accra, Gold Coast, to Lagos, Nigeria.

1886

271.6 Lagos, Nigeria, to Principe Island.

1886, 1907 481.1 Lagos, Nigeria, to Cotonou, Dahomey.

1902

66. 4 Total nautical miles (7 cables).

3, 034.9 All America Cables (Inc.), 67 Broad Street, New York City New York to Fishermans Point, Cuba.

1907

1, 519.2 Do..

1915

1, 482. 1 Do.

1924

1, 489.9 Fishermans Point, Cuba, to Aguadores, Cuba.

1921

43.6 Fishermans Point, Cuba, to Port au Prince, Haiti.

1926-27 198.9 Fishermans Point, Cuba, to Santo Domingo..

1921-1924 476.2 Santo Domingo to Ponce, Porto Rico.

1921-1924 223.2 Fishermans Point, Cuba, to Colon, Canal Zone.

1907

787. 2 Do..

1915

782. 1 Do.

1926

771.1 Colon, Canal Zone, to Port Limon, Costa Rica..

1922

197. 7 Colon, Canal Zone, to Cartagena, Columbia.

1920

313.4 Cartagena, Columbia, to Barranquilla, Columbia

1927

79.0 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to Atalaya, Argentina.

1920

1, 268. 1 Santos, Brazil, to Montevideo, Uruguay

1920

1, 070.2 Montevideo, Uruguay, to Atalaya, Argentina.

1919

66.6 Do.

1920

66.4 Do.

1920

68.3 Salina Cruz, Mexico, to La Libertad, Salvador.

1882-1924 451. 2 T-piece, San Jose, Guatemala, connecting with cable between Salina Cruz and La Libertad.

1882

36.0 La Libertad, Salvador, to San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua.

1882, 1924

290.5 Salina Cruz, Mexico, to San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua.

1893

693. 7 Ban Juan del Sur, Nicaragua, to Puntarenas, Costa Rica.

1882

216.4 Do.

1893

256. 4 Puntarenas, Costa Rica, to Balboa, Canal Zone

1882

566.3 Puntarenas, Costa Rica, to Santa Elena, Ecuador.

1893

927.1 Balboa, Canal Zone, to Buenaventura, Colombia

1882, 1925 419.3 Buenaventura, Colombia, to Santa Elena, Ecuador.

1882, 1925 562. 1 • 215.3 miles are owned by the Government but operated by the Eastern Telegraph Co.; 829 miles granted to the Government by the Eastern Telegraph Co., according to an agreement regulating the relations between the State and the company, but which has not yet become operative.

Submarine cables of the world-Continued

B. PRIVATE COMPANIES-Continued

Landing places

Date laid

Nantical

miles

T-piece, Esmeraldas, Ecuador, connecting with cable between Buenaventura and

Santa Elena..
Balboa, Canal Zone, to Santa Elena, Ecuador.

Do.
Santa Elena, Ecuador, to Paita, Peru.
Paita, Peru, to Chorrillos, Peru
T-piece, Trujillo, Peru, connecting with cable between Paita and Chorrillos.
Santa Elena, Ecuador, to Chorrillos, Peru.

Do..
Chorrillos, Peru, to Iquique, Chile.

Do..

Do..
Iquique, Chile, to Arica, Chile,
Iquique, Chile, to Tocopilla, Chile.
Iquique, Chile, to Antofagasta, Chile.
Iquique, Chile, to Valparaiso, Chile

Do..
Antofagasta, Chile, to Valparaiso, Chile.
Total nautical miles (45 cables) -

Commercial Cable Co., 67 Broad Street, New York City

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1. TRANSATLANTIC SYSTEM

Waterville, Ireland, to St. John's, Newfoundland (No. 1)
Waterville, Ireland, to St. John's, Newfoundland (No. 2)
Waterville, Ireland, to St. John's, Newfoundland (No.3)
Waterville, Ireland, to St. John's, Newfoundland (No. 5)
Waterville, Ireland, to Horta, Azores (No. 4)
Waterville, Ireland, to Horta, Azores (No.6)
Iloria, Azores, to Canso, Nova Scotia (No. 4)
Horta, Azores, to Canso, Nova Scotia (No. 6)

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2. EUROPEAN SYSTEM

Waterville, Ireland, to Havre, France (Havre No. 1).
Waterville, Ireland, to Havre, France (Havre No. 2).
Waterville, Ireland, to Weston-super-Mare, England (Weston No. 1)
Waterville, Ireland, to Weston-super-Mare, England (Weston No. 2)
Waterville, Ireland, to Weston-super-Mare, England (Weston No.3).
Waterville, Ireland, to Weston-super-Mare, England (Weston No. 4).

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3. SYSTEM ON AMERICAN COAST

St. John's, Newfoundland, to New York (New York No. 1).
St. John's, Newfoundland, to New York (New York No. 2)
St. John's, Newfoundland, to Canso, Nova Scotia (Canso No. 1).
St. John's, Newfoundland, to Canso, Nova Scotia (Canso No. 2)
Canso, Nova Scotia, to New York (New York No. 3).
(anso, Nova Scotia, to New York (New York No. 4).
Canso, Nova Scotia, to New York New York No. 5).
Canso, Nova Scotia, to Rockport, near Boston..
Canso, Nova Scotia, to Port aux Basques, Newfoundland.

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Total nautical miles (23 cables).

Commercial Cable Co. of Cuba, 67 Broad Street, New York City

New York to Habana, Cuba (No. 1).
Miami, Fla., to Habana, Cuba (No. 2)..

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