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at the rate of six per cent. per annum, from the time prescribed in such requisition.

18. That Congress shall lay no direct taxes without the consent of the legislatures of three-fourths of the states in the union.

X. That the journals of the proceedings of the senate and house of representatives, shall be published as soon as conveniently may be, at least once in every year; except such parts thereof relating to treaties, alliances, or military operations, as in their judgment require secrecy.

81. That regular statements of the receipts and expenditures of all publick moneys shall be published at least once a year..

X11. As standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, and ought not to be kept up except in cases of necessity, and as at all times the military should be under strict subordination to the civil power, that therefore no standing army or regular troops shall be raised or kept up in time of peace.

xul. That no moneys be borrowed on the credit of the United States, without the assent of two-thirds of the senators and representatives present in each house.

xiv. That the Congress shall not declare war with. out the concurrence of two-thirds of the senators and representatives present in each house.

xy. That the words “ without the consent of Con. * gress," in the seventh clause in the ninth section of the first article of the constitution, be expunged.

XVI. That no judge of the supreme court of the United States, shall, hold any other office under the United States, or any of them ; nor shall any officer appointed by Congress, or by the president and senate

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of the United States, be permitted to hold any office under the appointment of any of the states.

XVII. As a traffick tending to establish or continue the slavery of any part of the human species, is disgraceful to the cause of liberty and humanity ; that Congress shall as soon as may be, promote and establish such laws and regulations as may effectually prevent the importation of slaves of every description into the United States.

XVIII. That the state legislatures have power 10 recal, when they think it expedient, their federal senators, and to send others in their stead.

xix. That Congress have power to establish a uniform rule of inhabitancy or settlement of the poor of the different states throughout the United States.

XX. That Congress erect no company with exclusive advantages of commerce.

XXI. That when two members shall move or call for the ayes and nays on any question, they shall be entered on the journals of the houses respectively.

Done in convention, at Newport, in the county of

Newport, in the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, the twenty-ninth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety, and the fourteenth year of the

independence of the United States of America. By order of the convention.

(Signed) DANIEL OWEN, President.

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On the 9th of February, 1791, the following acts of the state of Vermont relating to the constitution were communicated to Congress.

STATE OF VERMONT.

An Act to authorize the People of this State to meet in

Convention to deliberate upon and agree to the Constitution of the United States.

WHEREAS, in the opinion of this legislature, the future interest and welfare of this state, render it necessary that the constitution of the United States of America, as agreed to by the convention at Philadelphia, on the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eightyseven, with the several amendments and alterations, as the same has been since established by the United States, should be laid before the people of this stale for their approbation.

It is hereby enacted by the general assembly of the state of Vermont, That the first constable in each town shall warn the inhabitants who by law are entitled to vote for representatives in general assembly, in the same manner as they warn freemen's meetings, to meet in their respective towns on the first Tuesday of December next, at ten o'clock forenoon, at the several places fixed by law for holding the annual election, and when so met they shall proceed in the same manner as in the election of representatives, to choose some suitable person from each town to serve as a delegate in a state convention, for the purpose of deliberating upon and agreeing to the constitution of the United States as now established; and the said constable shall certify to the said convention the person 50 chosen in manner aforesaid. And, .'; sed

It is bereby further enacted by the authority asoresaid, That the persons so elected to serve in state convention as aforesaid, do assemble and meet together on the first Thursday of January next, at Bennington, in the county of Bennington, then and there to delibes rate upon the aforesaid constitution of the United, States, and if approved of by them, finally to assent to, and ratify the same in behalf and on the part of the people of this state, and make report thereof to the governour of this state, for the time being, to be by him communicated to the president fof the United States, and the legislature of this state.

STATE OF VERMONT. . . .

Secretary's Office, Bennington, Jan. 21, 1791. The preceding is a true copy of an act passed by the legislature of the state of Vermont, 'the twentyseventh day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety. Attest.

ROSWELL HOPKINS,

Secretary of State.

In Convention of the Delegates of the People' of the

- State of Vermont. Whereas by an act of the commissioners of ihe state of New York, done at New York, the seventeenth day of October, in the fifteenth year of the independence of the United States of America, one thousand seven hundred and ninety, every impediment, as well on the part of the state of New York, as on the part of the state of Vermont, to the admission of the state of Vermont into the union of the United States of America, is removed. In full faith and assurance that the same will stand approved and ratified by Congress.

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This convention having impartially deliberated upon the constitution of the United States of America, as now established, submitted to us by an act of the general assembly of the state of Vermont, passed October twenty-seventh, one thousand seven hundred and ninety, do, in virtue of the power and authority to us given for that purpose, fully and entirely approve of, assent to and ratify the said constitution; and declare, that immediately from and after this state shall be admitted by the Congress into the union, and to a full participa. tion of the benefits of the government now enjoyed by the states in the union, the same shall be binding on us, and the people of the state of Vermont for ever...

Done at Bennington, in the county of Bennington,

the tenth day of January, in the fifteenth year of
the independence of the United States of America,
one thousand seven hundred and ninety-one. lo
testimony whereof we have hereunto subscribed
our names.
(Signed) THOMAS CHITTENDEN,

President. Signed by one hundred and five members—Dissented four.

Attest. Roswell Hopkins, Sec’ry of Convention,

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