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“ gress to the constitution of the United States, be “ ratified by this commonwealth.

“ Dec. 15, 1791. JOHN PRIDE, S. S.” “ Agreed to by the Senate. T. MATTHEWS, S.H.D.”

“Examined.”

No returns were made by the states of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Georgia and Kentucky.

The amendments thus proposed became a part of the constitution—the first and second of them excepted ; which were not ratified by a sufficient number of the state legislatures.

At the first session of the third Congress the following amendment was proposed to the state legislatures.

UNITED STATES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED.

Resolved by the senate and house of representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two-thirds of both houses concurring, That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several states, as an amendment to the constitution of the United States; which, when ratified by three-fourths of the said legislatures, shall be yalid as part of the said constitution, namely,

The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another state, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state. FREDERICK AUGUSTUS MUHLENBERG,

Speaker of the House of Representatives. JOHN ADAMS, Vice President of the United

States, and President of the Senate. Attest, J. BECKLEY, Clk. of the House Representatives.

Sam. A. Otis, Secretary of the Senate.

From the journals of the house of representatives, at the second session of the third Congress, it appears that returns from the state legislatures, ratifying this amendment, were received as follows: ".

From New York, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Georgia and Delaware. * At the first session of the fourth Congress, further returns ratifying the same amendment, were received from Rhode Island and North Carolina. - At the second session of the fourth Congress, on the 2d of March, 1797, the following resolution was adopted : : :

UNITED STATES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED.

RESOLVED by the senate and house of representalives of the United States of America, in Congress as. sembled, That the president be requested to adopt some speedy and effectual means of obtaining infor: mation from the states of Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and South Carolina, whether they have ratified the amendment proposed by Congress to the constitulion concerning the suability of states; if they have, to obtain the proper evidences thereof. JONATHAN DAYTON, Speaker of the

House of Representatives. ... WILLIAM BINGHAM, President pro tem

pore of the Senate. Approved, March 2, 1797. GEORGE WASHINGTON, President of

the United States. At the second session of the fifth Congress, the following messages from the president of the United States, were transmitted to both houses.

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MESSAGE.

Gentlemen of the Senate, and

Gentlemen of the House of Representatives,

In compliance with the desire of the two houses of Congress, expressed in their resolution of the second day of March, one thousand seven hundred and ninetyseven, that some speedy and effectual mcansı might be adopted of obtaining information from the states of Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina, whether they have ratified the amendment proposed by Congress to the constitution, concerning the suability of states, and if they have, 'to obtain the proper evidences; measures have been taken, and information and evidences obtained, the particulars of which will appear in the report, from the secretary of state, made by my direction on the twenty-eighth day of this month, and now presented to the two houses for their consideration. Hos!!!) og? kuitstapaļ to los condomer

Ida SH :: JOHN ADAMS. United States, December 30, 1797.

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MESSAGE.
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Gentlemen of the House of Representatives, Lin ,

I HAVE pow an opportunity of transmitting to Congress, a report of the secretary of state, with a copy of an act of the legislature of the state of Kentucky, consenting to the ratification of the amendment of the constitution of the United States proposed by Congress, in their resolution of the second day of December, 1793, relative to the suability of states. This amendment, having been adopted by three-fourths of the several states, may now be declared to be a part of the constitution of the United States.' 0,63 01

... olisu . JOHN ADAMS. .: United States, January 8, 1798. w?.. 13:

At the first session of the eighth Congress, the following amendment was proposed by Congress, to the state legislatures.

EIGHTH CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES. At the first session, begun and held at the city of

Washington, in the territory of Columbia, on Monday, the seventeenth of October, one thousand eight hundred and three.

Resolved by the senate and house of representatives of the United States of America, in Congress as: sembled, two thirds of both houses concurring, That in lieu of the third paragraph of the first section of the second article of the constitution of the United States, the following be proposed as an amendment to the constitution of the United States, which, when rati. fied by three-fourths of the legislatures of the several states, shall be valid to' all intents and purposes, as part of the said constitution, to wit: i n geri

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The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for president and vice president, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves ; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as president, and in disa tinct ballots the person voted for as vice president, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as president, and of all persons voted for as vice president, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, di. rected to the president of the senate; the president of the senate shall, in the presence of the senate and house of representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person having the greatest number of votes for president, shall be the president, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed ; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers, not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as president, the house of representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the president. But in choosing the president, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. And if the house of representatives shall not choose a president whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March

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