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CHANGE.

MISS L. E. LANDON.

Where are the flowers, the beautiful flowers,
That haunted your homes and your hearts in the

spring?
Where is the sunshine of earlier hours ?
Where is the music the birds used to bring ?
Where are the flowers ? - why, thousands are

springing, And many fair strangers are sweet on the air; And the birds to the sunshine their welcome are

singing Look round on our valley, and then question

Where? Alas! my heart's darkness! I own it is summer,

Though little 't is like what it once used to be : I have no welcome to give the new comer;

Strangely the summer seems altered to me. 'T is my spirits are wasted – my hopes that are

weary ; These made the gladness and beauty of yore : To the worn and the withered even sunshine is

dreary ; And the year has its spring, though our own is

no more.

- 'How often in our path Crossed by some being, whose bright spirit sheds A passing gladness o'er it: but whose course

Leads down another current, never more
To blend with ours: yet far within our souls,
Amidst the rushing of the busy world,
Dwells many a secret thought, which lingers still

Around that image!'

GRASS.

Surely nothing in the vegetable kingdom grows more profusely, and eventually proves more beneficial, than the grass of the field, which, to-day is, and to-morrow is cut down.'

God has given it a conspicuity among the works of his hands, which came from chaos at his creating nod.' After the light was divided from the darkness,' - the heavens and the earth were formed; Omnipotence, as if anticipating the necessities of the creatures he should soon create to inhabit the earth, said, let the earth bring forth grass. David tells us, that 'He causeth grass to grow for the cattle.

In holy writ man's fleeting days are compared to grass, – the wind passeth over it and it is gone.' Peter, in his first general epistle, tells us, that all flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of grass.

The grass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth away.' Isaiah, when comforting the people of Jerusalem, concerning the coming of him who should cry in the wilderness,'

presents, as encouragement to trust in God, a com. parison between the stability if God's word and the instability of frail, passing man. 'All flesh is grass, and all the goodliness thereof as the flower of the field : The grass withereth, the flower fadeth; out the word of our God shall stand forever.'

MILTON.

Let the earth
Put forth the verdant grass, herb, yielding seed,
And fruit tree yielding fruit after her kind,
Whose seed is in herself upon the earth,
He scarce had said, when the bare earth, till then
Desert and bare, unsightly, unadorned,
Brought forth the tender grass, whose verdure clad
Her universal face with pleasant green:
Then herbs of every leaf that sudden flowerod
Opening their various colors, and made gay
Her boson, smiling sweet.

THE ROSE.

D. EVERETT ROSE.

Loved daughter of the laughing May!

The light of all that 's pure is thine; The rosy beams that wake the day,

Upon thy cheeks of velvet shine. Thy beauty paints the evening skies, It mingles with the rainbow's dyes, In love's own light its blushes speak On ruby lip and vermeil cheek.

No wooing zephyrs ever strayed

To whisper love or steal a kiss, Or dancing sunbeam ever played

Upon a sweeter flower than this. The night fays o'er thy bosom strew The sparklet of the nectar dew; And on their shrine the pearls have slept, Like tears the dying stars have wept.

Many a pouting lip has flushed

In rival beauty by thy side; Many a maiden cheek has blushed

In vain to match thy crin son pride. The pink may burst its varied hue, The violet its azure blue, The lily claim the snow its own; But still thou reign'st undimmed alone.

Thou hast the tale of love expressed,

In words the faltering tongue forebore;
And answering from the heart confessed,

What eye and cheek had told before.
Young hearts have whispered to thy ears
The secret of thy hopes and fears;
When nestled in a gentle breast,
Thou had'st thy tender folds carest.

Ah! anxious hope long watch has kept,

Despairingly beneath thy cover; While fond heart sighed and bright eye wept

The absence of a faithless lover. And many a vow of love is made, And fond heart pledged beneath thy shade; While friendly moonbeams light thy bower, And glide too soon the stolen hour.

I love thee, emblem of my youth!

Thou bring'st to mind fond memories;
When fancy wore the garb of truth,

And love made earth a paradise.
But as those dreamy hours have fled
Before the light stern truth has shed,
So will thy fleeting beauty fade,
And join the wreck that time has made.

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