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PARCEL POST

DOMESTIC PARCEL POST

APPLICATION

The postal laws and regulations of the United States provide for service and ratings on the fourth class mailing matter. Under the fourth class service and charges a most elaborate transportation system has been developed, and this development and service is commonly known as domestic parcel post. The intent and purpose of the law was to provide a convenient and efficient manner of transporting merchandise and parcels between points in the United States and its possessions. Under the parcel post regulations there may be handled practically all mailable matter that would not be classified under first class, second class or third class. The regulations of the Post Office Department provide for a large variety of goods to be shipped, among which are the following: Albums, harmless live animals, bees, books, bulbs, calendars, catalogs, flour, fruits, grain, merchandise, metals, minerals, motion picture films, paintings, printed matter, seeds, stationery. All commodities that are handled as parcel post are subject to the regulations of the Post Office Department as to condition of shipment, kind of shipment, size and weight of shipment. Shippers who are users of parcel post should secure the “United States Official and Postal Guide," which provides full regulations for the handling of parcel post.

GENERAL
REGULATIONS

In the handling of parcel post matter, the Post Office Department provides, among other regulations, that all parcel post matter must be fully prepaid and parcels must be unsealed, in order that the contents may be examined by postal officials. In the event that parcels are sealed, the Post Office Department will treat such matter as first-class mail. Exception, however, is made which provides that parcels may be sealed when they are so labeled as to show the nature of contents, including name and address of sender, and further, providing that such sealed parcels may be opened for postal inspection.

The lids of boxes containing shipments may be nailed or screwed, provided the lids can be readily removed for examination of contents. Special provision as to packing is provided for liquids and fragile articles as well as perishable goods all of which articles may be accepted by parcel post if the shipper complies with the requirements of the Post Office Department.

In the shipment of parcels the weight limit of the article is 70 pounds per parcel, when mailed for delivery within the first, second or third zone district from mailing office, and 50 pounds limit applies to all other zones, namely, fourth to eighth, inclusive, as well as on parcels for Manila, P. I., while to other points in the Philippine Islands the restriction as to weight is reduced according to destination. In addition to the weight limit of the individual package or parcel, the sender is restricted to 200 pounds limit to all shipments when consigned to one addressee on the same day. However, this additional limitation does not include perishable matter. Likewise, limitation is provided as to the size, in that parcel post matter must not exceed 84 inches in length and girth combined. In measuring a parcel the greatest distance in a straight line between the ends (but not around the parcel) is taken as its length, while the distance around the parcel at its thickest part is taken as its girth.

PARCEL POST

ZONES AND
UNIT NUMBERS

For the purpose of applying charges on parcel post shipments, the United i is divided into districts designated as units consisting of area thirty minutes si under which system it forms the basis of eight postal zones throughout the States. The number of units in which each office is located is shown after the of the office in the State list of the Parcel Post Guide, and in order to ascertain post rates, the sender should first obtain the unit number of the office of m and then the unit number of the office of the addressee, which will give the post zone, and in connection with the rate chart (see page 389) determin charge for the parcel to be shipped.

The following is the zone key for unit No. 717, which is New York City which, in connection with the parcel post rate zone schedule (see page 389), deter the rate to be charged according to the weight of the article and destination. example, the parcel post guide provides that New York is in unit 717, St. Minn., is in unit 2659, which shows that from New York to St. Paul the zone used is No. 6, and an examination of the rate schedule will show that for a 10shipment from New York to Zone No. 6 the charge is 81 cents; likewise, St. Mo., is in unit No. 2371, and from New York it is located in Zone No. 5, al parcel post charge for a 10-pound shipment would be 68 cents.

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THE FOLLOWING ARE WHOLLY WITHIN THE INDICATED ZONES:
Arizona, 8

Idaho, 8

Ohio, 4
California, 8

Illinois, 5

Oregon, 8
District of Columbia, 3

Louisiana, 6

Porto Rico, 7
Georgia, 5

Nevada, 8

Rhode Island, 2

Utah, 8
Virgin Islands, 7
Washington, 8
Wisconsin, 5.

Alaska
Canada
Canal Zone

THE FOLLOWING SHALL BE CONSIDERED AS OF THE 8TH ZONE:
Cuba
Mexico

Samoan Islands
Guam
Philippine Islands

U. S. Postal Agency, Shanghai, China
Hawaiian Islands

Republic of Panama

PARCEL POST

RATES AND
CHARGES

The parcel post regulations provide that:

(a) Parcels weighing 4 ounces or less, except books, seeds, plants, etc., 1 cent for each ounce or fraction thereof, any distance.

(b) Parcels weighing 8 ounces or less, containing books, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, scions and plants, 1 cent for each 2 ounces or fraction thereof, regardless of distance.

(c) Parcels weighing more than 8 ounces, containing books, seeds, plants, etc., parcels of miscellaneous printed matter weighing more than 4 pounds, and all other parcels of fourth-class matter weighing more than 4 ounces are chargeable, according to distance or zone, at the pound rates shown in the table on page 389, except that parcels subject to the pound rates, mailed for delivery within the first or second zone, are, when the distance by the shortest regular mail route from the office of origin to the office of delivery is 300 miles or more, chargeable with postage at the rate of 6 cents for the first pound and 2 cents for each additional pound, a fraction of a pound being computed as a full pound.

INSURED AND
C. 0. D.
PARCELS

The Post Office Department provides that fourth class or domestic parcel post mail may be insured against loss, rifling or damage in an amount equivalent to its actual value up to $5.00 for a fee of 3 cents; $25.00 for 5 cents; $50.00 for 10 cents, or $100.00 for 25 cents, in addition to the postage. Both postage and fee must be paid by postage stamps affixed to the parcel, and may be insured at any post office or station, or by rural carriers, but must not be deposited in street mail boxes or in mail drops at post offices. The amount of the insurance fee and the amount of postage shall be stated separately on the receipt given the sender and on the record retained at the mailing office. Parcels accepted for insurance for which return receipts are desired should have the words "Receipt Desired” conspicuously and legibly stamped or written directly above the name of the addressee. Firms should be requested to keep careful record of the return of such receipts, to avoid subsequent unnecessary inquiries and complaints.

Fourth class or domestic parcel post mail may be sent C. 0. D.; that is, the price of the article and the charges thereon (including, if desired, the postage and fee prepaid) will be collected from the addressee, not to exceed $50 on payment of a fee of 10 cents (in stamps affixed to the parcel) in addition to postage; and not to exceed $100 on payment of a fee of 25 cents. Such parcels are insured for not exceeding $50 and $100, respectively, according to whether a 10 or 25 cent fee was paid, against the non-receipt of returns therefor if delivered and collection is effected, and against loss, rifling or damage in an amount equivalent to the actual value. The Post Office Department will not assume responsibility for errors made by senders in stating the collection charges, or for any misunderstanding between senders and addressees regarding the price, character or contents of parcels. The sender of a C. 0. D. parcel will not be permitted to pay a fee of only 10 cents thereon when the amount to be remitted is greater than $50, even though he should be willing to accept indemnity only for $50 in case of loss; but when the value of a parcel exceeds $50 and the remittance to be made to the sender is $50 or less, the parcel may, if the sender so desires, have a 25 cent fee paid thereon, entitling him to indemnity, for any loss or damage sustained, not in excess of $100. A parcel on which the remittance is $50, but on which, because of the money-order fee, the collection from the addressee will be in excess of that amount, will require only a 10 cent fee. The amount of C. O. D. fee and the amount of postage shall be stated separately on the receipt given the sender and on the record retained at the mailing office.

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NOTE.-The local rate applies to parcels mailed:
(1) At any post office for local delivery at such office.
(2) At any city letter-carrier office, or at any point within its delivery limits. for delivery by carriers from that office.

(3) At any post office from which a rural route starts, for delivery on such route, or when mailed at any point on a rural r delivery at any other point thereon, or at the office from which the route starts, or for delivery on any other rural route starting same office.

EXPORT TRAFFIC

EXPORT TRAFFIC

The economic and commercial conditions of a large country pass through three stages of evolution, and of these stages the United States has passed through two. The first stage is when a country, from a commercial basis, is not in a position to sustain itself except through the importation of the majority of the products it consumes. The second stage is when the country is practically self-sustaining; that is, can conduct its commercial business relations without any great measure of assistance from foreign countries. The third stage, and that upon which the United States has already entered, is when the country's production exceeds its domestic consumption. Each year the productive capacity of the United States exceeds in a greater degree its domestic consumption, hence an export outlet for surplus production becomes each year more important. The value of the export market as a means of reducing overhead through enabling increased production is being more widely recognized by manufacturers throughout the country.

It is the impression of the novice that the elements entering into the transportation of foreign traffic are vastly different from those of domestic traffic. This may be true as to details, but as to fundamental principles foreign traffic and domestic

traffic are very similar. INTRODUCTORY The traffic or shipping department is an essential department of an institu

tion engaged extensively in foreign trade. In many cases the foreign traffic department is required to perform duties pertaining to insurance and banking, as well as shipping.

To make this treatise as clear as possible, it is thought advisable to state briefly the important initial features of export shipping, i. e., terms of delivery and payment for goods.

Until the integrity and financial status of a foreign buyer is known, it is customary to require the establishment of a credit payable in the United States, either at seaboard or interior point of shipment.

Terms of sale should be very explicit, and preliminary negotiations should state clearly what portions of transportation charges, if any, the seller assumes. Many foreign buyers require "C. I. F.” quotations, but this is difficult to figure accurately on other than standard commodities which are carried by steamship lines at weight rates.

Most of the export sales contemplate payment, by the seller, of the charges to United States seaboard, i. e., terms F. O. B. railroad terminal at port of export.

It is important that sellers familiarize themselves with American Foreign Trade Definitions, on page 404, as clarity on this point will avoid the most frequent cause of misunderstanding between buyer and seller.

Information relative to railroad rates, also port terminal rules and regulationss

may be ascertained from the Commercial Agents or Rate Bureaus of the railroads. INLAND RATES,

In some instances, notably on Trans-continental shipments through Pacific Ports, destined to the Orient, Australasia, etc., materially lower railroad rates are provided on goods exported than on domestic shipments.

Rates from interior points to the Port of New York on export goods are the same as on domestic shipments, a concession being made, however, in connection with free

RAIL REGULA-
TIONS AND
STEAMSHIP
SPACE RESERVA-
TIONS

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