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RELATION OF THE HIGH SCHOOL TO LIFE

"A boy is better unborn than untaught."-Emer

son.

"Provided always the boy is teachable (for we are not proposing to make a statue out of punk), football, cricket, archery, swimming, skating, climbing, fencing, riding, are lessons in the art of power, which it is to his main business to learn." EMERSON.

"He that refuseth instruction despiseth his own soul; but he that heareth reproof getteth understanding." PROVERBS, 15.

32.

"Apply thine heart unto instruction, and thine ears to the words of knowledge." PROVERBS, 23. 12.

REFERENCES:

Emerson: Culture.

Mathews: Chap 5.

Bacon: Of Youth and Age.
Matthew, 25.

RELATION OF THE HIGH SCHOOL
TO LIFE

1. The opportunities for securing a good position in business with a manufacturer, merchant, lawyer, doctor, farmer, increase with the training of the applicant. Most business men require letters of recommendation from teachers, former employers, or others, who know regarding training and experience.

In the Baldwin Locomotive Works at Philadelphia, for example, apprentices are classified in three groups: Those who have had a college training; those who have had a high school training; those who have had neither: and the wages and the opportunities for advancement depend upon this training.

2. The chances of success in business increase with the training, altho, of course, in lines of business in which much book-learning is not required, the training and discipline is rather that of experience. Mr. Carnegie and Mr. Schwab, for example, were very successful as steel manufacturers, altho neither had a college training. Both, however, are men of extraordinary ability who have since acquired much literary skill from wide reading and practice. It will be found usually that the proportion of college men who have made a great success in business is far beyond their proportion in the community at large.

Business men without school training find them

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