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CONTENTS OF VOL. II.

MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE FRONTIER POPULATION EAST AND

SOUTH OF THE OHIO RIVER.A.D. 1770 TO 1810.

Argument.-Condition of the frontier Settlements of western Pennsylvania and Vir.

ginia. - Characteristic Traits of the Pioneers generally. – Manners and Customs :

1. Costume of the Hunters: the Hunting-shirt; Pantaloons ; Breech-cloth and Leg.

gins; Moccasin. — 2. Habitation : the Log Cabin; its Location ; internal Appear-

ance.—3. Employments: the respective Duties of Man and Wife.—4. Diet: Meats ;

wild Game ; Bread; Pone; Journey-cake; Hog and Hommony; Substitutes for Tea

and Coffee.-5. Settlement Rights : Nature and Extent; tomahawk Improvements.

- Fort, or Station : Form and Construction; its Location and Use ; Stations in

Kentucky.7. Hunters : Science of Hunting; a hunting Camp; Game; Hides ; Pel-

tries.—8. Caravans : annual Trips to Baltimore and Frederic; Equipment of Cara-

van; solitary Route across the Mountains ; Order of March; Fare.-9. The moral

Sense : state of Morals; natural Honesty and Sense of Honor the supreme Law;

force of Public Opinion ; “Lynch Law ;" "Regulators.”—10. Social Virtues : Hos-

pitality; Sociality; Conviviality; a marriage Party; Sports and Amusements.-11.

Boatmen : general Character; Costume ; Habits ; peculiar Traits of Character.—12.

National Character : Diversity of People and Languages blended; Peculiarities of

Feelings and Habits neutralized; Influence of free Government upon the Enterprise

and moral Character.-13. Religious Traits : Religion disconnected with civil Pow.

er; Ministers dependent for Support upon their own Merit; religious “ Awakenings,"

or "Revivals,” in the West ; “Camp-meeting" Scene; Origin of Camp Meetings in

Kentucky and Tennessee; Camp Meeting at Cane Ridge; at Desha's Creek; at

Cabin Creek; astonishing Influence of sylvan Preaching, and the attendant Circum-

stances; extraordinary Conversions; Disturbance of mental and nervous Systems

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the Frontier.— Their cautious and destructive Movements.-Renegade white Men

associated with Indians.

Indian Implements of War.—The Rifle.—The Scalping-knife.—Tomahawk.-Battle-

ax.-War-club.—Declaration of War.- Torture.-Running the Gantlet.— Torture at

the Stake by Fire.

Eminent Pioncers of Kentucky.—1. Daniel Boone.-His Nativity and early Habits.-

Personal Traits of Character.-His first Acquaintance with Kentucky in 1769 and

1771.-At Watauga in 1775.-Opens a Road from Holston to Kentucky River.-

Captain at Boonesborough until 1778.-Captured by Indians at Blue Licks.-His

Captivity and Escape.-An active Defender of Kentucky until 1783.- Abandons

Kentucky in 1800.-Settles in Missouri.—His Remains and those of his Wife re-

moved to Kentucky in 1845.—2. Simon Kenton.-His Character as a fearless Pio-

neer.—Nativity and Early Habits.-Youthful Indiscretion and subsequent Hardships.

-A Hunter in Kentucky.- A Hunter in Western Virginia.--Attached to Dunmore's

Army.—Becomes “a Hunter of Kentucky.”—His personal Appearance at the Age

of twenty-one Years.—His benevolent Disposition.-Attached to Kentucky Stations.

- Accompanies Colonel Clark to Kaskaskia.-Returns to Harrod's Station.-- Visits

the Paint Creek Towns.-Captured by Indians.-Wild Horse Torture.-Divers Tor.

tures and Punishments suffered during his Captivity.- Sold in Detroit.-Escapes to

Kentucky.-Serves under Colonel Clark in 1780 and 1782.-An active partisan War-

rior until 1792.—Encounters Tecumseh.-Serves in Wayne's Army.- Abandons Ken-

tucky in 1802.—Removes to Ohio.-Serves under Colonel Shelby in 1813.-Died in

1836.—3. Robert Patterson.-Nativity, early Life, and Habits.-Serves in Dunmore's

Army.-A prominent Pioneer of Kentucky in 1776.-Erects a Station on the Site of

Lexington in 1779.- Active Defender of Kentucky during the Indian War.—4. Ma-

jor George Rogers Clark.--His early frontier Services.-His Character and Military

Genius.-Superintends the Defense of Kentucky from 1776 to 1782.-Reduction of

British Posts in 1778, 1779

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CHAPTER III.

EXTENSION OF VIRGINIA SETTLEMENTS AND JURISDICTION TO THE

MISSISSIPPI.-INDIAN HOSTILITIES UPON THE OH10.-A.D. 1776

To 1780.

Argument.-Retrospect of the frontier Settlements of Western Virginia, Pennsylva.

nia, North Carolina, and Kentucky in 1776.—Check to these Settlements by hostile

Cherokees.-Cherokee War.—Three-fold Invasion of Cherokee Country.—" Treaty of

Dewett's Corner."-" Treaty of Long Island," on Holston.-Cherokees retire from

ceded Territory.—Hostilities of Northwestern Tribes.—Kentucky Stations supplied

with Powder by Major Clark.—Posts on the Ohio.-Attack on M'Clellan's Station,

December, 1776.-Hostilities in West Augusta. — County of Kentucky erected.-

Militia Organization in 1777.—District of West Augusta divided into three Counties.

-Ohio County organized.-Settlements in West Augusta.—The Indians attack Har-

rod's Station ; also, Logan's Fort and Boonesborough.-Militia organization in Ohio

County.-Memorable Siege of Boonesborough from July 4th to September.—Captain

Logan's Re-enforcement from North Carolina.—Colonel John Bowman's Re-enforce-

ment.-County of Kentucky organized.—Militia Organization.Extent of Kentucky

County.-Colonel Henderson indemnified for Loss of Transylvania.—Indian Hostili-

ties near the Ohio.-Cornstalk, Ellinipsico, and Red Hawk killed at Point Pleasant.

-Condition of Wheeling Fort.—"Fort Henry.”—Situation and Importance of this

Fort.-Attacked by four hundred Indians under Simon Girty. -Loss of the Garrison

near the Fort.-Incidents of Indian Warfare.—Major M'Cullock.—Captain Mason.-

Major Clark plans the Reduction of Kaskaskia.—The Expedition proceeds from the

Falls."-Surprise and Capture of Kaskaskia and “Fort Gage."-Suspension of Civil

Government in West Augusta.—Martial Law suspended.—Courts organized.-At-

torneys and Attorney-general. — Daniel Boone and twenty-seven Men captured at
CHAPTER IV.

INDIAN WARS ON THE OHIO. EXTENSION OF THE AMERICAN

SETTLEMENTS EAST AND SOUTH OF THE OHIO.-A.D. 1781 TO

1784.

Argument.-Severe Winter of 1780–81.-Scarcity in Kentucky.-Kentucky divided into

three Counties.—Indian Hostilities on Bear-grass Creek.-Attack on Boone's and

M'Afee's Stations. - Indians contemplate utter Destruction of Kentucky Settle.

ments.-Chickasås attack Fort Jefferson in 1780.—Counties of Kentucky organized.

-General Clark's gun-boat Defense on the Ohio River--Abundant Crops of 1781.

-Indian Hostilities renewed in the Spring of 1782.-Estill's Defeat.-Last Survivor

of his Party.-Indian Hostilities continued.—Laherty's Defeat.-Indian Invasion, un-

der Simon Girty, on Bryant's Station.—Disastrous Battle of Blue Licks.-Colonel Lo.

gan baries the Dead. Upper Ohio.-Settlements of West Augusta harassed.-

Wheeling Campaign against the Moravian Towns.—Horrible Massacre of peaceable

Indians.-Former Position of the Moravian Towns.—Previous Admonitions neglected.

--Disastrous Campaign against Moravians on Sandusky.-Colonel Crawford and Dr.

Knight captured. — Execution and horrid Torture of Colonel Crawford. - British

Agency the Source of Indian Hostilities.-Attack on Wheeling Fort, and on Rice's

Fort. Louer Ohio.-General Clark invades the Indian Country in 1782.-Effects of

this Invasion.—Domestic Prosperity of Kentucky.-Settlements extend North of

Licking.-Flood of Emigration sets into Kentucky.—The “District of Kentucky" or-

ganized.-Peace with Great Britain announced.—Extent of the Kentucky Settle.

ments in 1783.—Population and Moral Condition of the Settlements.-Settlements

extend North of Licking River in 1784–85.—Settlements in Western Virginia . 119

CHAPTER V.

INDIAN HOSTILITIES ON THE OH10.-PREDATORY INCURSIONS INTO

KENTUCKY, AND PARTISAN WARFARE.-A.D. 1785 to 1793.

Argument. The Shawanese resume predatory Incursions.- Indian Horse-stealing-

Object and Extent of these Depredations. The Continuance of them provokes In-

vasion of the Indian Country in 1786.—Plan of Campaign under General Clark and

Colonel Logan.-Colonel Logan destroys Scioto and Mad River Towns.-General

Clark advances to the Wabash.-His further Operations frustrated for Want of Sup-

plies.-A Mutiny ensues.—He returns inglorious to Kentucky.—His Sun sets.–Vir:

ginia comes to his Relief.—The Shawanese commence active Hostilities.-Exposed

Condition of Settlements in Mason County in 1787.--Colonel Todd invades the Paint

Creek Towns.-Bimon Kenton as a Partisan Warrior.- Emigration in 1788.-Indians

harass the Ohio Frontier of Kentucky and Western Virginia.—Depredations and

Marders on the Obio from 1788 to 1790.—Population of Kentucky in 1791.–Partisan

Warfare from 1790 to 1791.-General Harmar's Efforts to suppress Indian Hostilities.

-The Campaigns of 1790 and 1791 divert Hostilities from the Kentucky Frontier.--

Indian Hostility and partisan Warsare in Kentucky renewed in 1792-93.–Kenton

makes an Incursion upon the Little Miami, and encounters Tecumseh.-Severe night

Skirmish with Tecumseh in 1792.-Kenton continues his partisan Warfare in 1793.---

Makes an Incursion to Paint Creek.-Intercepts and kills a marauding Party of In

dians at Holt's Creek on the Ohio, and recovers a large Number of Horses

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CHAPTER VI.

POLITICAL CONDITION OF THE “DISTRICT OF KENTUCKY,” FROM 1783

UNTIL ITS ADMISSION INTO THE FEDERAL UNION AS AN INDE-

PENDENT STATE.-A.D. 1783 to 1794.

Argument.—Retrospect of the political Condition of the District.-Causes for political

Discontent.— The People desire an independent State Government.–First Conven.

tion in 1784.—Socond Convention in May, 1785.Third Convention recommended.—,

Great Emigration to Kentucky in 1786.-Improved Condition of the Kentucky Set-

tlements in 1786.-Measures adopted by the third Convention.-Action of the Vir-

ginia Legislature in favor of Separation.-Requisite Action by Kentucky anavoida-

bly delayed. Fourth Convention appointed for August, 1787.–First Newspaper in

Kentuoky.-Agricultural and commercial Prosperity in 1787.-Navigation of the Mis-

sissippi commenced.--Pifth Convention held in September, 1787.-Sixth Convention

in July, 1788.-Diversity of political Sentiment. Political Parties.-Action of the

sixth Convention.- Prominent Men.--Corresponding Action of the Virginia Leg.

islature.-Final Action of this Convention, and Application for Assent of Congress.

-Assent of Congress granted February 4th, 1791.-Boundaries of the new State.

-First State Governor and Legislature convened June 4th, 1792, for the organi-

zation of State Government.-Causes of the protracted delay of Separation.-A new

Experiment in Political Philosophy.-Notice of political Parties.-Foreign Influence.

-Spanish Intrigue.-Increasing Trade with New Orleans.-— The fluctuating Policy

of Spain with regard to the Navigation of the Mississippi.--Genet's Intrigue for the

Invasion of Louisiana in 1793-94.-Measures taken by the Federal Government to

suppress the contemplated Invasion.—Reluctance of Governor Shelby to interfere in

the Plans of Genet.—Increasing Population of Kentucky in 1794.—New Counties

organized.—Kentucky levies for the Campaign in the Northwestern Territory.-Ad-

vantages derived by Kentucky from Treaties of London and Madrid.-Last Efforts

of Spain to detach Kentucky from the Union.-Progressive Wealth and Popu

tion of Kentucky.-Governors of Kentucky

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INDIAN RELATIONS AND TREATIES WITH THE UNITED STATES, FROM

THE TREATY OF PARIS TO THE TREATY OF GREENVILLE."-

A.D. 1783 to 1795.

Argument.-Retrospect relative to the Northwestern Boundary.-Reluctantly assent-

ed to in the Treaty of 1783 by Great Britain.-Disregard of Treaty Stipulations rela.

tive to the Northwestern Posts by British Cabinet.—British and Indian Alliance

during the Revolutionary War.–Western Feeling toward the Indians.-Jealousy

of the Indians at the rapid Advance of the White Settlements.- Measures of Con.

gress to conciliate Indian Jealousy.-Preliminary Steps for Treaties with all the

Tribes.—Treaties by individual States prior to 1784.--Treaty of Fort Stanwix, and

the Treaty Line.—Treaty of Fort MʻIntosh, and Boundary Line.- Treaty of the Mi.

ami with the Shawanese, and their Cession of Lands.-Treaties of Hopewell with

Southern Indians.-Cherokee Treaty.-Choctâ Treaty.-Chickasâu Treaty.-Extent

of Country and Number of Warriors of each Nation respectively.—Dissatisfaction of

the Six Nations relative to the Treaty of Fort Stanwix.—Their Grievances.-Prep-

arations for a new Treaty.—Treaty of Fort Harmar in 1789.—The Shawanese refuse

to attend.--Shawanese encouraged to Hostilities by British Traders at Detroit.-

Connivance of the British Government at these Intrigues.—Hostilities commenced

upon the Ohio Frontier.-Pacific Overtures of Governor St. Clair.-Unsettled Condi-

tion of the Southern Indians.-The Cherokees.--Encroachments of the Cumberland

Settlements.-Treaty of Holston, July 2d, 1791.-Creek Disturbances.—Measures to

conciliate the Creeks.—The Treaty of New York with M'Gillivray and other Creek

Chiefs.—Efforts of Spanish Agents to embarrass the Negotiations.—M'Gillivray's Op-

position.—The Creeks instigated to War.-Cherokees commence Hostilities.-Span-

ish Intrigue with Creeks and Cherokees.-Creek Preparation for Hostilities against

Cumberland Settlements.-Bowles, & Creek Chief.- Indian Tribes generally make

Overtures for Peace and Friendship after Wayne's Victory.—Treaty with Six Na-

tions in 1794.-Treaty of Greenville in 1795, comprising all Northwestern Tribes.-

Termination of Indian Wars.

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CHAPTER IX.

EXTENSION OF THE FIRST WHITE SETTLEMENTS ACROSS THE OHIO,

UNTIL THE CLOSE OF THE INDIAN WARS.--A.D. 1787 to 1794.

Argument.-Claims of Virginia and other States to “Northwestern Territory' relin-

quished, with certain Reservations.—" Connecticut Reserve."-Virginia military

District.—“ Northwestern Territory' laid off by Ordinance of 1787.—Territorial Gov.

ernment provided.- Partial Occupation by United States. First Settlement on the

Muskingum.-Putnam's Colony, from Connecticut, arrives at Fort Harmar April 17th,

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