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Talevoile, do. L. O. his x mark,
Voiengran, do. B. O. his x mark,
Scamani, do. L. O. his x mark,
Nura Hague, do. B. O. his x mark,
Me Chinga, do. L. O. his x mark,
Pachigue, little chief, B. O. his x mark,
Rouda Nique, warrior, L. O. his x mark,
Ne Paste, do B. O. his x mark,
Voibisandhe, do. L. O. his x mark,
Nehi Zanga, do. B. O. his x mark,
Nehudhe, warrior, L. O. his x mark,
The Pagranque, do. B. O. his x mark,
Chahetonga, do. L. O. his x mark,
Manguepee Mani, do. B. O. his x mark,
Voi Balune, do. L. O. his x mark,
Ponea Voitaniga, do. B. O. his x mark,
Taslondhe, do. L. O. his x mark,
Nendolagualui, warrior, B. O. his x mark,
Manguepu Mani, L. O. his x mark,
Ni Conil Bran, do. B. O. his x mark,
Voi Bahe, do. L. O. his x mark,
Onhehomani, do. B. O. his x mark,
Nuranin, do. L. O. his x mark,
Noguinilayque, do. B. O. his x mark,
Nanlatoho, do. L. O. his x mark,
Bashemindhe, do. B. O. his x mark,
Savoi, do. L. O. his x mark,

Chouquemonnon, do. B. O. his x mark,

Mandarihi, do. L. O. his x mark,
Manilourana, do. B. O. his x mark,
Nequevoile, do. L. O. his x mark,
Chonguehanga, do. B. O. his x mark,
Ponlachinga, do. L. O. his x mark,
Aguigueda, do. B. O. his x mark,
Manjaguida, do. L. O. his x mark,
Voidoguega, do. B. O. his x mark,
The Sindhe, do. L. O. his x mark,
Ninchagari, do. B. O. his x mark,
Voihadani, do. L. O. his x mark,

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We, the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the band of Osages, residing on the river Arkansas, being a part of the Great Osage nation, having this day had the foregoing treaty read and explained to us, by his excellency Meriwether Lewis, esquire, do hereby acknowledge, consent to, and confirm all the stipulations therein contained, as fully and as completely as though we had been personally present at the signing, sealing, and delivering the same on the 10th day of November, 1808, the same being the day on which the said treaty was signed, sealed, and delivered, as will appear by a reference thereto.

In witness whereof, we have, for ourselves and our band of the Great Osage nation residing on the river Arkansas, hereunto set our hands and affixed our seals.

Done at St. Louis, in the territory of Louisiana, this thirty-first day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and nine, and of the independence of the United States the thirty-fourth.

Gresdanmanses, or Clermond, first chief, his x mark,
Couchesigres, or Big Tract, second chief, his x mark,
Tales, or Straiting Deer, son of Big Tract, his x mark,
Aukickawakho, nephew of Big Tract, his x mark,

Wachawahih, his x mark,

L. s.

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Pahelagren, or Handsome Hair, his x mark,

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Hombahagren, or Fine Day, his x mark,

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Harachabe, or the Eagle, his x mark,

Hrulahtie, or Pipe Bird, his x mark,

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Tawangahuh, or Builder of Towns, his x mark,

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Honencache, or the Terrible, his x mark,

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Talahu, or Deer's Pluck, his x mark,

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Cahigiagreh, or Good Chief, his x mark,
Baughonghcheh, or Cutter, his x mark,
Basonchinga, or Little Pine, his x mark,

In presence of us, and before signature attached to the original:

John G. Comegys,

George Man,

John W. Honey,

Samuel Solomon, jun.

John P. Gates, Interpreter,

Noel Mongrain Marque, Indian

Interpreter,

Bazil Nassier Marque, Indian In

terpreter.

L. S.

L. S.

L. S.

CHIPPEWAS, OTTAWAS, ETC.

[CONCLUDED NOVEMBER 25, 1808.]

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Brownstown, in the ter ritory of Michigan, between William Hull, governor of the said territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States of America, for concluding any treaty or treaties, which may be found necessary, with any of the Indian tribes northwest of the river Ohio, of the one part, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors of the Chippewa, Ottawa, Pattawatima, Wyandot, and Shawanee nation of Indians, of the other part.

ART. 1. Whereas, by a treaty concluded at Detroit, on the seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord' one thousand eight hundred and seven, a tract of land lying to the west and north of the river Miami, of lake Erie, and principally within the territory of Michigan, was ceded by the Indian nations to the United States; and whereas the lands lying on the southeastern side of the said river Miami, and between said river, and the boundary lines established by the treaties of Greenville and fort Industry, with the exception of a few small reservations to the United States, still belong to the Indian nations, so that the United States cannot, of right, open and maintain a convenient road from the settlements in the State of Ohio to the settlements in the territory of Michigan, nor extend those settlements so as to connect them; in order therefore to promote this object, so desirable and evidently beneficial to the Indian nations, as well as to the United States, the parties have agreed to the following articles, which when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, shall be reciprocally binding.

ART. 2. The several nations of Indians aforesaid, in order to promote the object mentioned in the preceding article, and in consideration of the friendship they bear towards the United States, for the liberal and benevolent policy which has been practised towards them by the government thereof, do hereby give, grant, and cede, unto the said United States, a tract of land for a road, of one hundred and twenty feet in width, from the foot of the rapids of the river Miami of lake Erie to the western line of the Connecticut Reserve, and all the land within one mile of the said road, on each side thereof, for the purpose of establishing settlements along the same; also, a tract of land, for a road only, of one hundred and twenty feet in width, to run southwardly from what is called Lower Sandusky, to the boundary line established by the treaty of Greenville, with the privilege of taking, at all times, such tim ber and other materials from the adjacent lands, as may be necessary for making and keeping in repair the said road, with the bridges that may be required along the same.

ART. 3. It is agreed, that the lines embracing the lands given and ceded by the preceding article, shall be run in such directions as may be thought most advisable by the President of the United States, for the purposes aforesaid.

ART. 4. It is agreed the said Indian nations shall retain the privilege of hunting and fishing on the lands given and ceded as above, so long as the same shall remain the property of the United States.

ART. 5. The several nations of Indians aforesaid, do again acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other sovereign; and the United States, on their part, do renew their covenant to extend protection to them according to the intent and meaning of stipulations in former treaties. Done at Brownstown, in the territory of Michigan, this 25th day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight, and of the independence of the United States of America the thirty-third.

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Miere, or Walk in the Water, his x mark,
Iyonayotaha, or Joe, his x mark,

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SHAWANEES,

Skahomet, or Black Chief, his x mark,
Adam Brown,

Makatewekasha, or Black Hoof, his x mark, L. S.
Koitawaypie, or Col. Lewis, his x mark,

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Executed, after having been fully explained and understood, in presence of

Reuben Attwater, Secretary of the Territory Michigan,

James Witherill, a Judge of Michigan Territory,

Jacob Visger, Judge of the District Court,

Jos. Watson, Secretary L. M. T.

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Whitmore Knaggs,

William Walker,

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Sworn In

terpreters.

HARRIS HAMPDEN HICKMAN,

Secretary to the Commissioner.

DELAWARES, PATTAWATIMAS, ETC.

[CONCLUDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1809.]

A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Pattawatimas, Miamis, and Eel River Miamis.

James Madison, President of the United States, by William Henry Harrison, governor and commander in chief of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for treating with the said Indian tribes, and the sachems, head men, and warriors, of the Delaware, Pattawatima, Miami, and Eel River tribes of Indians, have agreed and concluded upon the following treaty; which when ratified by the said President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, shall be binding on said parties.

ART. 1. The Miami and Eel River tribes, and the Delawares and Pattawatimas, as their allies, agree to cede to the United States all that tract of country which shall be included between the boundary line established by the treaty of fort Wayne, the Wabash, and a line to be drawn from the mouth of a creek called Racoon creek, emptying into the Wabash, on the southeast side, about twelve miles below the mouth of the Vermilion river, so as to strike the boundary line established by the treaty of Grouseland, at such a distance from its commencement, at the northeast corner of the Vincennes tract, as will leave the tract now ceded thirty miles wide at the narrowest place. And also all that tract which shall be included between the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at fort Recovery, thence southwardly along the general boundary line established by the treaty of Greenville, to its intersection with the boundary line established by the treaty of Grouseland; thence along said line to a point, from which a line drawn parallel to the first mentioned line, will be twelve miles distant from the same, and along the said parallel line to its intersection with a line to be drawn from fort Recovery, parallel to the line established by the said treaty of Grouseland.

ART. 2. The Miamis explicitly acknowledge the equal right of the Delawares with themselves to the country watered by the White river. But it is also to be clearly understood, that neither party shall have the right of disposing of the same without the consent of the others; and any improvements which shall be made on the said land by the Delawares or their friends the Mochecans, shall be theirs forever.

ART. 3. The compensation to be given for the cession made in the first article, shall be as follows, viz: to the Delawares, a permanent annuity of five hundred dollars; to the Miamis, a like annuity of five hundred dollars; to the Eel River tribe, a like annuity

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