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TABLE

6 $196,223 58

5

DEBTS.

Amount.

170,873 58
98,973 58
92,250 00

92,250 00
102,250 00

137,000 00
154,250 00

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AMERICAN COLLEGE OF MEDICAL SCIENCE.

Incorporated by act of April 2, 1858,' and located in the city of New York. The powers conferred were similar to those granted to Medical Colleges, but it was not required to report to the Regents. It is not known by the Editor as to whether it was ever organized.

$57,590 23

47,149 55

86,269 23

43,416 34

37,472 00 165,205 00 126,032 25

178,541 40

AMERICAN VETERINARY COLLEGE.

This institution was formed under a general act in April, 1875, and is located at 141 West Forty-fourth street, New York city. Its reports to the Regents begin for the year ending in 1878, and the number attending and graduating has been as follows:

Students 1878, 22; 1879, 42; 1880, 53; 1881, 52; 1882, 51; 1883, 61.

Graduates 1878, 6; 1879, 8; 1880, 18; 1881, 18; 1882, 20; 1883, 22. Total, 92.

AUBURN MEDICAL COLLEge.

Application was made in 1820 for the establishment of a Medical College at Auburn. In a report made by Mr. Van Rensselaer, February 21, 1820, from a committee of the Board of Regents to which the matter had been referred, objection is made upon the ground that it was inexpedient to increase the number of incorporated Medical and Surgical institutions within the State, and that there was no probability that a sufficient fund could be raised for its support, without Legislative aid. The committee, however, added that they

1 Chap. 85, Laws of 1858.

were satisfied "that the proposed site for a Medical College would be more eligible than Fairfield, and that if the College at Fairfield could lawfully be transferred to Auburn, it would silence every reasonable pretence for the incorporation of another Medical College."

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL MEDICAL COLLEGE.

Bellevue Hospital was formerly the Alms House Hospital, and included most of the charity patients of the city. Before 1847, the medical affairs of the hospital appear to have been confided mainly to a resident physician; but on the 19th of November of that year, a Medical Board was organized, in which the staff was divided into physicians and surgeons, who held permanent instead of temporary appointments, and visited the wards in alternation. This change seems to have led directly to a plan for using the ample resources of the hospital for instruction. At the end of February, 1849, fifteen months after the Board was formed, an amphitheatre had been constructed. Clinical lectures were begun, and have been since continued.

A building erected through the zeal and energy of Dr. James R. Wood, for the prosecution of pathological studies, was inaugurated October 25, 1857, and instruction was continued three or four years in the winter months, but without its being as yet regarded as a dis.tinct Medical College. The care of the hospital, having by an act of April 17, 1860,1 passed from the "Board of Governors" of the former "Alms House Department," to the "Department of Public Charities and Correction," a suggestion appears on the minutes of the Medical Board, under date of December 18, 1860, as the report of a committee consisting of Drs. Isaac E. Taylor and James R. Wood, proposing a separate Medical College, independent of a mere hospital for clinical teaching, "and thus making it one of the largest hospitals, and it may be, schools in the United States- nay Europe." The project matured rapidly; on the 1st of March, 1861, a committee was appointed to procure plans for a College building, and on the 30th, the commissioners informed the Medical Board that it might be erected upon the hospital grounds.

A few days after a medical faculty was organized, and the first exercises were short courses of lectures delivered in April and May of that year, by Professors J. R. Wood and Frank H. Hamilton, upon points connected with Military Surgery - a subject made im

1 Chap. 510, Laws of 1860, p. 1027.

47

portant from the war then just commencing. They were attended by about two hundred practitioners and students.

The College was incorporated by special act, April 3, 1861,1 under the name of "The Bellevue Hospital Medical College of the city of New York of the State of New York," with twenty-one Trustees,' who were to be divided by lot into three classes, and seven were to be elected annually by the Board, for terms of three years.

The corporation might hold property to the amount of $100,000, to be used for no other purpose, and such collections of books, and of the productions of nature and art as might be necessary for its purposes. They might grant the degree of Doctor of Medicine, and were to possess the general powers and be subject to the general restrictions and liabilities incident to corporations of this nature by the Revised Statutes.

This act was not to exclude students of other Medical Colleges from the enjoyment of the same privileges of hospital instruction they had enjoyed before, nor was it to exclude students of the Homœopathic College, chartered the year before, from the privileges of the hospital.

The building for the new Bellevue Hospital Medical College was erected during the following summer; meanwhile a regular course of lectures was established, but before the first course was finished the need of a larger building became apparent. After some delays, it was erected in the autumn and winter of 1865-66, by the commis sioners, to serve the purposes of both a College and a Bureau of Medical and Surgical Relief for Out-door Poor, established in July, 1863. The old building was altered for use as a dead-house, the autopsy rooms, a room for judicial inquests and the morgue. The former auditorium became the museum, receiving the collections of Professors Wood and Mott, and the museum of the New York Medical College, purchased in 1864.

In 1871, the commissioners erected a larger and finer amphitheatre than the one previously used for clinical purposes, the old one having been found inadequate for the accommodation of the students in attendance.

Chap. 130, Laws of 1861.

The first Board consisted of Simeon Draper, James B. Nicholson, Isaac Bell, Jr., Moses H. Grinnell, John J. Astor, Moses Taylor, Wm. B. Crosby, John Ward, Samuel D. Cook, George F. Tallman, Edward Minturn, J. P. Gerard Foster, Anthony L. Robertson, E. H. Chapin, John Hughes, Robert T. Haws, Richard M. Blatchford, Robert S. Hone, James T. Brady, Watts Sherman and Matthew Mor. gan.

A summer course of lectures and recitations was commenced in 1867, and with this lecture course, recitations became from year to year more and more prominently associated, until the session of 1871, when they superseded entirely the systematic lectures, the course being made up of clinics by members of the Faculty of practical instruction in Diagnosis, Surgical Operations and Chemical Manipulations, in addition to the recitations, which were conducted by a corps of instructors throughout the year.

In a notice of this institution given in the work entitled "Public Service of the State of New York " (vol. III, p. 376), further information is given as follows:

"Of the Professors lecturing in Bellevue Hospital Medical College, fourteen are connected with the Bellevue or Charity Hospital either as physicians, surgeons or obstetricians. The Professors in all the practical departments hold appointments in the great public hospitals of New York. The Bureau of Medical and Surgical Relief for Out-door Poor is situated in the College building, and furnishes material for the College clinics.

The total number of patients in this department averages upward of 35,000 per year. Medical students are admitted to the Bellevue Hospital daily during the hours allotted to clinical teaching. All the important operations in surgery are performed publicly in the hospital amphitheatre. A steamboat, capable of accommodating the entire class, conveys the students from the College to the Charity Hospital, on Blackwell's Island, on the days when clinics are held, without charge. In addition to the Bellevue and the Charity Hospital, the student may avail himself of the resources for practical instruction afforded by other institutions under the charge of the Commissioners of Public Charities and Correction, namely: The Fever Hospital, the Hospital for Epileptics and Paralytics, the Nursery Hospital, the Insane Asylum, etc. The various city dispensaries and other public charities are also available to the student. The College building is not the property of the institution, but is occupied under a lease. The only property owned by the College is a museum, furniture and apparatus, the value of which is about $10,000. There is no College library. The College has no debts of any description. Its only source of revenue is the fees paid. The collegiate year embraces a regular winter session and a spring session. The regular term opens in October, and closes about the middle of March. The recitations, lectures and clinics for the spring session begin about the middle of March, and continue for thirteen weeks. Attendance during the regular term of the winter session is alone required for graduation, but the spring session affords opportunities to those who wish to prosecute the study of medicine in the city of New York during the spring months. During the spring term lectures upon special subjects

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