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1790, the number of academies was 3; in 1791, it was 5; in 1792, it was 7; and in 1793 and 1794 it was 10 at the date of reports, but some of these had but just been incorporated, and no statement of attendance was given.

The report of 1795 was much more extended than those of previous years, and had it been sustained in this manner, we might date from this period the beginning of very satisfactory returns. The statement of attendance was however fraginentary and defective for some years after, but enables us to present the following tables, in which the years are those to which the reports refer, and preceding those in which the reports to the Legislature were made.

Several changes have been made in the headings of the classifica tion of attendance, which will render it proper to divide the whole series into periods, having common resemblance, as follows:

(I) Period during which the Apportionment was based upon the Total number attending.

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YEARS.

1818. 1819..

1820..

1821.

1822.

1823.

78614906

5

Academies

reporting.

Number attending.

30

31

31

35

35

Attending at date of report.

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391 1802.

451 1803..

363
*692

1804.
1803..

2,428
2,218

2,230

2,417

2,683

2,667

YEARS.

232 1806..

1807. 191 1808.. 331 1809.

Pursuing class

ical studies.

Academies

reporting.

29

30

31

35

36

36

reporting. Academies

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7

Probably the number attending during the year. The other returns are generally those of students attending in the term in which the report is made, but of this there is uncertainty.

6189

(II) Period during which the Apportionment was made upon the number of Students pursuing Classical or Higher English Studies throughout the State.

11

861

1824. 636 1825. 629 1826.

794 1827.

820 1828..
1829..

851

10

Number attending.

YEARS.

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YEARS.

Number

1810..
1811.

1812.

1813...
1814..

1515....
1816.

1817

2.475

2,446

2,440

3.450

3,424 3,535

reporting. Academies

21

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Acade-
porting.

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Claimed. Allowed.

Acade

Number

attending.

Pursuing classical studies.

mies re

porting.
Num. of

students.

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1.519 1,216

2.87 2,551

861

629
794

820

831

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YEARS.

1824. 1025...

1826...

1827.

1828.

129...........

1830

1831.

1832..

1833.

1834.

1835.

1836

1837.

1838.

139...

1510

1841..

1842.

1843.... 1844.. 1845.

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Attending at date of report.

39

34

33

47

49

57

57

64

67

63

65

69

73

105

116

127

131

142

149

146

149

2,475
2,446

2,440

3,050

3,424

3,835

4,303

4,188

4,856

5,506

5,296

(III.) Period during which the Apportionment was made upon the number of students pursuing Classical or Higher English Studies by Senatorial Districts.

5,548

6,056

6,391

10, 111

10,881

11,477

11,306

12,142

11,581

11,803
12,608

Claimed as pursuing classical

studies.

41
48

53

57 58

65

67

64

69

74

106

118

127

131

142

149

146 153

1,377

1,780

2,120

2,422

2,487

3,025

3,502

3,792

4,069

4,590

5,084

7,122

8,957

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10,258

10,733

11,374 6,278 5,056

11,669 6,511
12,279 6,519
13,518 6,955

5,156
5,760
6,563

Allowed as pursuing
classical or higher
English studies.

(IV.) Period during which the Apportionment was made upon the number of Students pursuing Classical or Studies throughout the State, as shown by the

her English orts made by

Trustees of Academies.

39

34

32

41 1,240

48 1,632

53

675

709

709

65

67

64

66

90.05

91.68

2,030 95.75

57 2,220 94.99

58 2,399 96.46

3,000

3,390

3,741

4, 017

4,563

100 100

69

74 5,046

106

7,070

118

127

131

142

149

146

153

8,842

10, 186

10,560

11,277

11,596

12, 257

13,481

99.17

96.80

96.02

98.72

99.41

99.25

99.27

98.72

99.29

98.39

99.15

99.33

99.73

99.73

Total attending during the year.

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153 22,077
160
154
159
166

25,838
27,077

168 170

169

173

164

173

157

180

185

191

28,941

31,580

33, 015 35,077

37,406 38,734

29,967 35,973 36,498

35,009

36,733

36,951 37,929

35,958

35, 192 36,892

36,133

36, 464

34,851

32,735 30, 131 30,313

(V.) Attendance at academies since the adoption of the Regent's Preliminary Examinations in writing, as prescribed by the Regents.

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COLLEGES OR Other InstitutIONS AT WHICH THE PRINCIPALS OF NEW YORK ACADEMIES WERE EDUCATED.

The Regent's Report of 1863 (referring to 1862), introduced a statement of the Colleges or other institutions at which the Principals of Academies were educated, and this has been continued down to the present time. A summary of these returns for the whole period would have interest if they could be made complete; but from the large number of names returned without mentioning the place of graduation, in former years, we have deemed it sufficient to present a summary for the last five years; still incomplete but instructive so far as it goes.

N. Y. Colleges, etc. Alfred Univ...... Columbia.

Place of education. 1879. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. Place of education. 1879. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1883.

Cornell Univ.

Genesee..

Hamilton..

Hobart...
Ingham Univ.
Madison Univ.

Manhattan....
Rochester.
Rutger's, Fem.
St. Lawrence Univ.
St. Stephens,.
Syracuse Univ.
Union....

Univ. of city of N. Y.
Vassar..

Total Colleges.....] Normal schools... Academies....

Total N. Y. State

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METHODS OF TEACHING.

In 1817, Jonathan Ware, of Albany, addressed a memorial to the Senate, relating to an improved mode of teaching the languages, which was referred to the Regents for examination. Their committee, after making inquiries, and observing the result in different examinations in French classes, reported, that in their opinion, "the system of teaching practiced by him is superior to the ordinary course pursued in the generality of schools in this State. The method adopted by Mr. Ware resembles that of Dufief: it consists in teaching the proper names of things, and short familiar sentences in the first instances, and leaves grammatical instruction until the pupil is proficient in the art of speaking and understanding the language. This is the natural course, and its advantages are illustrated by the examinations referred to."

They had however no pecuniary patronage to bestow for rewarding individuals for discovering new and successful modes of instruction, however meritorious, and therefore simply reported as above.

Upon the 11th of April 1817, the Senate committee reported to the effect, that it appeared that Mr. Ware's method was a new and valuable improvement in the education of youth, and they recommended him as deserving of encouragement and patronage.'

About the year 1834, as the question of instruction of common School Teachers by Academies came up for discussion, we find Regent's Reports beginning to embrace articles and extracts from returns made by academies, in which "Methods of Teaching" form an important part. This information does not admit of condensation or classification, and our limits do not allow of its admission in these pages. But to the student of educational history we would commend the Regents' Reports for many years following the date above mentioned, as well worthy of his careful examination, and feel confident in assuring him that he will be well rewarded by the study. Average Attendance in the several Terms of the Year.

YEARS. Number.

1861.

1862.

163.

1864.

1865.

1866..

YEARS.

1838..

1839.

1840..

1811.

YEARS.

1874.. 1875...

1876.

1877

1878....

YEARS. Number.

22.238 1867
20,676 1868.

20,066 1869..

21,536

1870. 21,696 1871

21.885

1872..

31 131

1842...
1843..

36 136

41 243 1844.

45 269

YEARS.

6,069

6,135

6,301

1815.....

*Academic and preparatory students.

Number of Students Gratuitously Instructed.

Pursuing Preparing

for

classical
studies.

College.

20.721

19,948

19.032

19,545

*#9, 182
21,129

41
47

44
39

1,639

1,828

1,772

1,773

1,883

YEARS. Number.

1873..........

1874.......

1875.....

1876...

1877...

1878.

228

295
221
207

17,553

20,942

19,664

20,844
21,323

21,611

YEARS.

MEM

44

251 1850
53 257 1851.

1816...
1817.
1848.
1849...

47

213

1852. 57 435 1833...

YEARS.

345 1879.
1880..

381

395 1881...

380

1882..

397

1883.

1879

1880..

1881..

1882

1883..

YEARS.

Students pursuing Classical Studies, preparing for College, and

entering College.

Entering College this year.

1 Senate Journal, 1817, p. 324.

6,525

6,541

7,219

YEARS.

7,3-7

7,096

Number.

21,9

201

33 45 54 36

1,726

2,168

2,413

2,232

23.432

24,359

Pursuing Preparing Entering
classical
for
studies. College.

College this year

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