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The number of classes applied for and appointed for the Academic year 1882-83 was somewhat smaller than before in consequence of the increased requirements, but the results reached in these classes, as shown by the visitations of the inspector, the reports of the principals and school commissioners, and the answer papers forwarded to the Regents' office as the result of the final examinations of classes, indicated great care in observing the directions of the Regents, & higher grade of preparation for the work, a better class of material in the classes, a much larger proportion of members who are bona fide teachers, or who intend to become such, a far greater amount of instruction upon methods and school economy, and hence a better qualified class of teachers than the teachers' classes have heretofore produced.

The number of classes instructed during the Academic year 1883-84 was seventeen greater than during the preceding year, showing the fact that the Academies and their officers are giving their hearty support to the effort made by the Regents to advance the standard of the work done in these classes. It is believed that in a comparatively brief time the united efforts of school commissioners, Academies and the Board of Regents will result in increasing not only the number of classes, but also the average number in each class, bringing the benefits of special instruction for teachers within the reach of more numerous localities and of a greater number of teachers, and thus furnishing to the Common Schools a larger number of efficient teachers, and to a much greater number of children competent instruction.

Attendance in Teachers' Classes in Academies under the first Appointment until 1841, inclusive.'

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Under the increased number of Academies provided for in 1841 there was found difficulty in obtaining reports from some, owing

This table and the following are inserted by F. B. H., the general editor of this volume.

in part, it was suggested, to the more stringent regulations that were adopted,' and the numbers reported were less than those actually instructed. The results of attendance under this regulation and the names of the Academies included, are shown in the following table: Attendance in Academies appointed for the Instruction of Com-· mon School Teachers under the Regulations of 1841.

Montgomery Academy.....
Kinderhook Academy..
Delaware Academy
Washington Academy..
St. Lawrence Academy.
Fairfield Academy.

Hamilton Academy.
Hobart Hall.

Rensselaer Oswego Academy..

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ACADEMIES.

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ACADEMIC YEAR.

1842. 1843.

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The Academies above named were termed of the First Class, and were empowered to grant diplomas entitling the holder to teach a Common School. Another grade, termed those of the Second Class, were required to provide instruction to teachers under an act we shall presently notice, passed in 1838; but these were not allowed to grant these diplomas. Statistics of Attendance and Expenditures - Teachers' Classes

1849-84.

Franklin (Prattsburgh) Academy.......... 14
Ithaca Academy..

Cortland Academy.
Canandaigua Academy...

Middlebury Academy..

Rochester Collegiate Institute
Fredonia Academy....

Total...............

388

337

529

508

592

590

ACADEMIES.

Males. Females. Total.

524

532

601

711

597

595

494

449

363

297

363

406

463

564

503

582

592

551

617

572

608

811

855

863

326

128

553

433

517

ATTENDANCE.

610

663

1,044

1,062

1, 188

1,213

1,153

1,077

1,096

1,093

1,087

1,117

1,272

1,328

1,323

1,301

1,122

1.039

1,026

1,021

991

969

1,002

1,110

1,278

1,222

1,133

1,433

1,607

1,551

693

193

1,187

1,178

1,358

1 Convention Doc. 50 (1846), p. 5.

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CHAPTER XXVII.

ACADEMIES OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK.

The following list is intended to include the names of the several Academies that have been incorporated by the Regents and by the Legislature. In case of change of name, the obsolete names are generally introduced without more than a cross reference to the last or present name, where the principal data concerning them are given. In a few instances the names of unincorporated Academies are given, but these were generally in some way connected with those having a charter, either preceding or following them.

At all periods during the century there have been a large number of private Seminaries in the State, but with the exception of very recent years, we have no information concerning their number or attendance. In 1884 the number of pupils attending private schools was 119,952, or about ten per cent of the whole number under instruction.

The list of Principals has been compiled for the earlier years from the original reports. They were first printed in the Regents' report of 1850, and from that time to the present these lists have been prepared from these reports. In giving titles the one last used has generally been added, but this is not to indicate that it was held by the person to whose name it is placed during the whole period of service. It is also to be remarked that the absence of a title does not indicate that the person had no literary or professional titles. In a few instances, by the aid of Academies and county histories, we have been able to present series of names with reasonable assurance that they are complete; but of far the greater number it cannot be claimed that a full list is given. The information is presented as the best that could be obtained, and as only approximately complete.

It must be remembered that the latest information available in preparing this list has been the Regent's Report, printed in 1884, but referring to the year ending in 1883. In the few cases where 1884 has been entered it is from recent information by correspondence; and whenever 1883 is entered opposite the name it does not imply that the services of the person named had ended in that

year.

[With respect to the lists of Principals in the following pages, it should be remarked that from imperfections in existing records it has been found quite im possible in some cases to prepare perfect lists. They should, therefore, be regarded as only approximately complete. The titles appended are generally those which were reported as pertaining to these persons while employed as Principals, and at the end of the period while so reported. They may have afterward received degrees of higher grade, but of this no notice is taken. As the lists prior to 1850 were prepared from unpublished returns, and by clerks who had not been previously instructed upon this point, many persons may have been mentioned without noticing the literary titles belonging to them in the earlier years of the period embraced.]

ACADEMY AT LITTLE FALLS.

(See "Little Falls Union School, Academic Department.")

ACADEMY OF DUTCHESS COUNTY.

(See "Poughkeepsie High School.")

ACADEMY OF OUR LADY OF THE CATARACT. (Niagara Falls, Niag ara Co.)

Incorporated by the Legislature April 10, 1866. (Chap. 495, Laws of 1866.)

ACADEMY OF THE SACRED HEART. (Rochester, Monroe Co.) Incorporated by the Legislature, April 11, 1849.1 (Chap. 427, Laws of 1849.)

ADAMS COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. (Adams, Jefferson Co.) Incorporated by the Regents April 22, 1855, but not fully organized when a proposition was received from General Solon D. Hungerford of Adams, for a substantial endowment. The name was changed March 24, 1864, to

Hungerford Collegiate Institute.

Under this name an Academic School was opened in a large building near the railroad station built for a hotel. This was burned in 1867, and a very fine building was soon afterward erected, upon a slight eminence on the northern border of the village, commanding a most

1 By this act Jesse A. Auchinbaugh, of Rochester, was declared and constituted a corporation, with succession by his executors or trustees appointed by his last will and testament, subject to the general provisions of the Revised Statutes. The institution has not reported to the Regents.

beautiful prospect, and in design and arrangement surpassed by but few Academies in the State.1

This building was occupied from 1870 to 1882, it having been sold for a debt, and the trustees being unable to agree with the purchaser for further occupation, upon terms that they deemed just, the school was removed in 1882 to a block in the business part of the village. It remained there until burned out, in a disastrous village fire August 28, 1884.

The name "Adams Collegiate Institute," was restored by the Regents, in a provisional charter granted May 29, 1883, and declared absolute November 16, of that year. The Academic building has since been repurchased by D. A. Dwight and wife, of Adams, and conveyed by perpetual lease, subject to certain conditions to the present board of trustees.

Principals.

Rev. G. Dunbar Houghton, A. M., 1866-68. Orlo B. Rhodes, A. M., 1882.
Albert B. Watkins, A. M., Ph. D., 1871-82.

ADDISON ACADEMY.

(See "Addison Union School, Academic Department.") ADDISON UNION SCHOOL, ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. Steuben Co.)

(Addison

About the year 1848, an Academy was built by a joint stock company, and incorporated by the Regents, February 8, 1849. It was burned about 1856-8, and a new company was formed and another building erected. In 1869 this was sold to the school district and a Union School formed, which has since been conducted with success, the Academic department reporting to the Regents. Received under visitation April 21, 1868.

Marvin N. Baldwin, 1848.

Asa W. Smith, A. B., 1849.
Prof. Van Patten.

John Stacy. A. B., 1850-51.
R. B. Van Patten, A. B., 1852.
Fordyce Harrington, A. B., 1853.
B. J. McNiel, 1854-55

Francis M. Hyde, 1865-68.

Principals.

M. H. Paddock, 1869.
Prof. J. H. Bosard.
Theodore F. Welch, 1870-73.

Fox Holden, A. B., 1873-74.

Ewing L. Richardson, A. B., 1875-79.
Philip M. Hull, A. M., 1879-84.
Robert G. A. Estell, 1884.

ADELPHI ACADEMY OF BROOKLYN. (Brooklyn, Kings Co).

Incorporated by the Regents, August 3, 1870.

Principals.

Homer B. Sprague, M. A., 1871-75.

A description of this building with engravings will be found in the Regents Report of 1872, p. 461.

Stephen G. Taylor, A. M., Ph. D., 1876-82.

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