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FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR ELEVEN MONTHS, FROM JANUARY 1st.

1854.
1855.
1856.

1857. Entered for consumption... $126,155,443 $104,408,458 $148,562,621 $120,107,089 Entered for warehousing.. 28,963,725 24,115,079 34,650,285 70,033,885 Free goods.......

14,867,342 13,065,406 16,760,950 19,063,434 Specie and bullion...

2,069,116 747,776 1,567,549 12,216,910 Total entered at the port.. $172,055,626 $142,536,719 $201,541,405 $221,421,318 Withdrawn from warehouse 21,006,567 22,266,646 24,097,168 37,024,982

Of the imports of dry goods during the month of November, the great bulk have been thrown into warehouse, less than four hundred thousand dollars having gone directly into consumption. The total receipts of foreign dry goods at the port of New York, during the month of November, are $1,999,013 less than for the corresponding period of last year, $1,595,144 less than for the corresponding period of 1855, and $254,086 less than for the same time in 1854:

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT NEW YORK FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER.

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION.

1854. 1855. 1856. 1867. Manufactures of wool...... $320,267 $924,069 $834,527 $132,088 Manufactures of cotton..

204,445 489,752 746,138 67,042 Manufactures of silk.

590,757 977,765 1,074,671 83,748 Manufactures of flax....

234,050 397,225 543,868 56,012 Miscellaneous dry goods....

253,712 274,889 274,144 59,281 Total...

$1,603,231 $3,063,700 $3,473,348 $398,171 WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE.

1854. 1855. 1856. 1867. Manufactures of wool ...... $167,102 $62,270 $82,988 $154,950 Manufactures of cotton

52,618 54,073 135,307 74,239 Manufactures of silk

102,254 29,439 155.945 127,187 Manufactures of flax..

68,166 32,190 57,739 26,715 Miscellaneous dry goods..

28,831 45,284 56,220 42,318 Toial...........

$418,971 $223,256 $488,199 $425,409 Add entered for consumption 1,603,231 3,0 3,700 3,473,348 398,171 Total thrown ou market. $2,022,202 $3,286,956 $3,961,547 $823,580

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING.

1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. Manufactures of wool....... $68,292 $176,557 $198,179 $ 124,866 Manufactures of cotton.

135,308 292,587 339,220 620,983 Manufactures of silk..

196,909 289,766 195,326 488,688 Manufactures of flax.....

69,069 107,094 183,681 290,811 Miscellaneous dry goods....

157,203 119,588 63,357 230,579 Total......

$616,781 $985,542 $979,763 $2,055,927 Add entered for consumption 1,603,231 3,063,700 3,473,348 398,171

Total entered at port... $2,220,012 $4,049,242 $4,453,111 $2,454,098 This leaves the total imports of dry goods at New York, since January 1st, only $742,735 in excess of the corresponding period of last year, $27,932,618 in excess of the corresponding period of 1855, and $10,399,248 in excess of the same period of 1854. The warehousing account is very large, not only in consequence of recent commercial embarrassments which lead to the accumulation of stock in bond, but also to the large warehousing movement in anticipation of the change in the tariff that took effect last July :-

IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK, FOR ELEVEN MONTHS,

FROM JANUARY 1ST.

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1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. Manufactures of wool....

$4,046,154 $2,334,214 $2,570,682 $5,031,888 Manufactures of cotton

2,604,123 2,095,993 2,024,250 2,813,062 Manufactures of silk....

2,882,257 2,514,650 1,979,346 4,039,982 Manufactures of flax.

839,642 1,139,270 985,013 1,420,743 Miscellaneous dry goods....

379,266 785,930 423,328 775,483 Total withdrawn..... $10,651,423 $8,870,067 $7,982,619 $14,081,128 Add entered for consumption..... 65,624,668 53,386,262 78,636,091 66,116,396

Total thrown upon market... 76,276,000 62,256,319 86,618,710 80,197,524

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING,

Manufactures of wool...
Manufactures of cotton..
Manufactures of silk...
Manufactures of flax.....
Miscellaneous dry goods

1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. $4,668,179 $1,746,241 $3,124,867 $7,854,770

2,069,442 1,733,099 2,228,962 4,178,679 8,564,962 2,105,529 2,133,144 6,013,955 1,135,668 987,403 1,123,993 2,561,074

687,490 738,385 639,755 1,904,663

Total.......

$12,605,721 $7,310,657 $9,250,711 $22,513,141 Add entered for consumption...... 66,624,668 53,386,262 78,636,091 66,116,396

Total entered at the port.... 78,230,289 60,696,919 87,886,802 88,629,537 The export trade for the month was quite large, considering the difficulty of negotiating foreign exchange and the general derangement of business affairs. The total shipments from New York to foreign ports, exclusive of specie, was $972,868 less than for November, 1856, $1,954,073 less than for November, 1855, and $1,726,202 greater than for the corresponding month in 1854. The shipments of specie show a slight increase :

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR THE MONTI OF NOVEMBER.

1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. Domestic produce..

$4,660,007 $8,344,333 $7,541,595 $5,245,599 Foreign merchandise (free)....... 116,884 129,405 55,662 386,528 Foreign merchandise (dutiable).. . 323,389 306,817 202,093 1,194,355 Specie and bullion ...

3,038,001 1,011,900 2,955,839 3,239,231 Total exports......... 8,638,281 9,792,465 10,765,189 10,065,713

Total exclusive of specie.... 6,100,280 8,780,555 7,799,350 6,826,482 This leaves the shipments from the port of New York since January 1st, exclusive of specie, $5,968,570 less than the corresponding total of last year, but $6,126,095 greater than for the same period of 1855, and $10,442,873 greater than for the same period of 1854:

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS, FOR ELEVEN MONTHS, FROM JANUARY 1st.

1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. Domestic produce...... $62,667,868 $54,766,778 $71,007,627 $68.970,897 Foreign merchandise (free).. 1,661,963 3,618.876 875,668 3,726,297 Foreign mercbandise (dutiable) 4,239,044 4,290,000 2,887,023 6,104,554 Specie and bullion.....

37,101,142 26,639,205 35,439,585 36,826,122 Total expurts..... 95,460,017 89,314,858 110,209,903 105,626,870

Total, exclusive of specie.. 68,358,876 62,676,653 74,770,318 68,801,748 A considerable part of the difference, as compared with last year, is owing no doubt to the falling off in values, as nearly all articles of domestic produce are entered for export at lower rates, and this is likely to be still more strongly marked during the next six months.

The cash revenue, as we have already stated, shows a very important deficiency, and there is now no question in regard to the necessity of a loan to meet the current expenses of government. As the revenue has been, for some years past, more than sufficient for all the wants of the Treasury, there is no reason to suppose that the embarrassment will be more than temporary :

CASI DUTIES RECEIVED AT NEW YORK FROM JANUARY 1st.

First quarter ...,
Second quarter....
Third quarter....
lo October...
In November.....

1851.

1855.
1856.

1867.
$10,873,699 31 $7,585,288 21 $11,642,681 46 $13,406,813 26

8,864,261 45 6,711,657 60 10,898,464 29 5,886,708 85 12,699,868 05 11,601,517 60 14,430,078 08 13,183,832 90 2,402,115 10 3,329,194 95 3,391,230 97 867,534 99 1,751,023 45 2,171,707 76 2,774,845 63 1,121,792 70

Total since Jan. 1 36,590,967 36 31,402,366 02 43,137,300 43 34,466,681 90

This deficiency occurs at a very inopportune moment, inasmuch as the army estimates are likely to be somewhat increased by the difficulties with the Mormons, bat it will be promptly met, and will soon be made up when trade revives. We also annex our usual monthly statement of the progress of the export trade from New York, in the principal articles of domestic produce :

Tar ...

linseed .....

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE EXPORTS OF A FEW LEADING ARTICLES OF DOMESTIO PRODUCE, FRON NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS, FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 15. 1856. 1857.

1856. 1857. Ashes-pots, bbls... 8,573 12,971 Rosin....

451,669 397,108 pearls.... 1,440 3,629

20,241 32,464 Beeswax, Ibs. 206,180 253,907 Pitch.

2,730 3,475 Breadstuffs

Oils—wbale, galls.. 44,378 449,909 Wheat flour, bbls. 1,859,416 1,003,871 sperm..

598,062 882,826 Rye fisur..... 11,890 3,790

lard.

55,063 32,4 25 Curu meal....... 76,533 48,625

6,006 31,839 Wheat, bush. 9,167,489 3,583,468 ProvisionsRye..

1,253,828 81.446 Pork, bbls.... 133,782 49,473 Cor... 3,767,117 1,950,664 Beef... ..

64,481 45,179 Candles, mold, boxes 44,509 49,715 Cut meats, lbs.... 28,088,986 18,209,984 sperm.... 4,751 6,579 Butter.

1,091,118 857,663 Coal, tons.. 7,222 21,776 Cheese

3,606,855 4,297,841 Cotton, bales.... 188,118 159.580 Lard..

10,495,591 14,303,010 Hay 4,415 12,714 Rice, tcg....

37,016 28,838 Hops.

4,226 2,161 | Tallow, lbs... 1,161,939 3,061,417 Naval stores

Tobacco-crude,pkg. 32,879 40,660 Tarpmatine, bbls.. 81,559 61,110

manuf., lbs. 4.778,715 2,301,497 Spts. turpentine.. 34,858 46,918 | Whalebone, lbs..... 1,858,403 1,889,018

It will be seen that there is a falling off in the shipments of almost every article of domestic produce. This is true not only in regard to quantity but also in regard to value. The decrease is most strongly marked in breadstuffs and pro visions. Of course, one reason why breadstuffs have not been shipped more freely have been the comparative plenty of foreign harvests; but another prominent cause is the disarrangement of foreign and domestic exchanges and the great difficulty in moving produce. The seaboard towns and New England will now be supplied from the stock which has reached tide-water and remains unsold, (about 500,000 barrels of flour are thus on hand) and by the receipts per railroad, and from Southern ports still open. When canal navigation is resumed in the spring, the remaining surplus in the country must begin to move. There will be an unprecented accumulation of Indian corn, and an abundance of wheat and flour, and these must be sold at such prices as will induce shippers to take them. One of the great difficulties in Europe—that of dear food—will thus be removed, and for some years to come the products of the soil must find buyers abroad as well as at home.

NEW YORK COTTON MARKET FOR THE MONTH ENDING DECEMBER 25.

PREPARED FOR THE MERCIIANTS' MAGAZINE BY CHARLES W. FREDERICKSON, BROKER, NEW YORK.

My last review was dated November 27th, since which time the market has been dull and declining. The aspect of affairs abroad has been such as not to warrant purchases, and the difficulty of negotiating exchange, such as almost to stop shipments, unless sent forward nder positive orders by direction of Southern owners. Some few parcels pressed in sale have found unwilling purchasers for export, at prices generally below the current rates of the day, and there is a growing disposition not to touch the article unless at figures below those ruling at the close of our report. For home consumption the demand continues light, and although there is rather more inquiry, still not enough to sustain holders in their views. The total sales for the month are viewed at 9,000 bales, about one-half for shipment. Our unsold stock is estimated at 12,000 bales and increasing. The market closes at the following nominal quotations :

Upland. N.O. & Texas. Middling.

94

10 Good middling.

10

102 Middling fair

101

103 Estimates of crop of the South range from 3,100,000 to 3,200,000 bales. Here the general opinion may be put at 3,250,000 to 3,300,000 bales, both Davigable rivers : Receipts to date.

.. bales 832,000 Decrease 376,000 Export to Great Britain,

283,000 Increase 46,000 Export to France....

80,000 Decrease 36,000 Total exports :

423,000 Increase 4,100 Stock on band

429,000 Decrease 192,000

JOURNAL OF BANKING, CURRENCY, AND FINANCE.

THE FINANCES OF THE UNITED STATES, REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY FOR 1857. The annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury, on the state of the finances, is a document always looked for with great interest by the country. The first report of Mr. Secretary Cobb, presented to Congress December 8th, 1857, will receive, owing to the present condition of monetary affairs, a more general and careful attention than is usually given to such documents. The receipts for the fiscal year ended June 30th, 1857, were as follows :Quarters ending

Customs.

Lands. Miscellaneous. Total. Sept'r 30, 1856... $20,677,740 40 $892,380 39 $355,310 57 $21,925,431 36 Dec'r 31, 1866... 14,243,414 90 808,262 86 123,999 59 15,175,667 35 March 31, 1857... 19,055,328 55 1,065,640 11 274,054 90 20,395,023 56 Jane 30, 1857... 9,899,421 20 1,063,213 28 172,756 92 11,135,391 40

Total........ $63,875,905 05 $3,829,486 64 $926,121 98 $68,631,513 67 Balance op baod July 1st, 1856..

19,901,325 45 Aggregate means available for the fiscal year 1856-57...... $88,532,839 12 Expenditures for the year

Civil, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous, $27,531,922 37
Service in charge of Interior Department.. 5,358,274 72
Ditto, War Department...

19,261,774 16 Ditto, Nary Department.

12,726,856 69 Purchase of the public debt..

5,943,896 91 Total.....

$70,822,724 85

Balance in the Treasury July 1, 1857.......

$17,710,114 27 The transactions of the Treasury during the first quarter of the current fiscal Fear, 1858, being from July 1, 1857, to September 30, 1857, werePreceipts from

Expenditures for Custous,

$18,573,729 37 | Civil list, foreign interPublic lands. 2,059,449 39 course, &c...

$7,315,789 00 Miscellaneous sources... 296,641 05 Interior Department.. 3,240,098 99

War Department... 7,290,950 83 Total...... $20,929,819 81 Navy Department.. 3,915,906 99

The public debt

1,951,782 56 Excess expenditures.... 2,784,708 06

Total. ..........

$23,714,528 37 The estimates for the entire current fiscal year, and for the next year, are thus presented :-Balance in Treasury July 1, 1857.......

$17,710,114 27 Receipts for let quarter of 1857–58 (actual)..... 20,929,819 81 Receipts for 2d, 3d, and 4th quarters (estimated) 36,750,000 00 Aggregate means for the year 1857-58.....

$75,389,934 08 Aggregate of estimated expenditures, ditto..

74,963,058 41 Estimated balance July 1, 1858....

$426,875 67 Estimates for 1858-69Receipts ....

75,500,000 00 Total means.....

$75,926,875 67 Expenditures...

74,064,755 97

Balance July 1, 1859....
VOL. XXXVIII.-NO. I.

$1,862,119 70

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