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amount, of $9,337,851, attributable to the fact that mortgages and consigned goods, together with the shipping as registered in the Custom-house, have been included in the personal property, for the first time, this year. The item of "steamers, vessels, and sailing craft," alone amounts to $1,637,400. The highest single assessment on the books is to the California Steam Navigation Company, $565,000—the taxes on which amount to $12,955.

The assessments on this year's rate of taxation, is two dollars and thirty cents on the hundred—of which seventy cents belong to the State, thirty-five cents to the free common schools, and the balance of one dollar and twenty-five cents will be appropriated to the payment of the interest, and to the sinking funds for the liquidation of the bonded debts, and to the payment of the current municipal expenses. This entire collection will therefore be thus set apart :For State purposes..

$277,942 For free common schools....

$138,972 For bonded debts and expenses.

496,326 635,298 Total assessed taxes for 1857-58.......

$913,240 The auditor, in his last annual report, estimates the demands on the treasury; for the current year, as under :--For the bonded debts, $263,383 ; for school fund and current expenses, $340,500; total expenses, 1857–58, $603,783. To which must be added--for the bonded debts, 1856-57, $65,200; for outstanding indebtedness, 1856–57, $133,467; total estimated expenses, $802,250. To meet the above expenditures are the following sources of revenue, viz.:--The city and county taxes, 1857–58, $635,298 ; licenses, fines, rents, etc., 1857-58, $150,000; city and county taxes, 1856–57, $249,675 ; estimated total revenue, $1,035,973 ; estimated total expenses, $802,450 ; overplus, $232,523.

The above figures justify the gratifying conclusion that, if property owners will do their duty, the city's embarrassments will end with this fiscal year. In the estimated sources of revenue, we have not included the taxes delinquent prior to the existence of the present consolidated city and county government, (July 1, 1856,) as they are payable in the indebtedness of 1855-56, which will, it is anticipated, considerably more than absorb the entire floating debt of that year, both city and county.

ACT IN RELATION TO SAVINGS BANKS IN NEW YORK, The following act passed both branches of the Legislature of New York March 20th, 1857, and having been approved by the Governor, is now in iorce :

Section 1. The several savings banks or institutions for savings now incorporated, or which may hereafter be incorporated, shall, on or before the twentyfifth day of January and on or before the twenty-fifth day of July, in each year, make a report in writing to the Superintendent of the Bank Department, of the condition of such savings banks or institutions for savings, on the first days of January and July; which report shall be verified by the oath of the two principal officers thereof; and shall state therein the total amount due to depositors; the total amount of assets of every kind ; the principal sum of each and every bond and mortgage, with the estimated value of the property on which it is based; amount invested in stock, designating each particular kind of stock, and the estimated market value of the same; the amount loaned upon the security of stock, with a description of all stocks so held ; the amount, if any, loaned on personal securities; the amount invested in real estate; the amount of cash on hand, or on deposit in bank, with the names of the banks where deposited, and the amount placed in each; and the amount loaned or deposited in any other manner than herein described. The report of January in each year, shall, in addition, also state the pumber of open accounts; the amount deposited, and the amount withdrawn; also, the amount of interest received, and the amount placed to the credit of depositors during the year preceding the date of such report.

the

Any willful false swearing in respect to such reports, shall be deemed perjury, and subject to the punishments prescribed by law for that offense. And if any savings bank or institution for savings, shall jail to furnish to the Superintendent of the Banking Department, its report at the times herein stated, it shall forfeit the sum of one hundred dollars per day for every day such report shall be so delayed; and the said superintendent may maintain an action in his name of office to recover such penalty, and when collected, the same shall be paid into the Treasury of the State.

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the Superintendent of the Bank Department, on or before the twentieth day of February in each year, to communicate to the Legislature a statement of the condition of every savings bauk and institution for savings from which reports have been received for the preceding year; and to suggest any amendments in the laws relative to savings banks or institutions for savings, which in his judgment may be necessary or proper to increase the security of depositors.

Sec. 3. Whenever any savings bank or institution for savings shall fail to make a report in compliance with this act, or whenever the Superintendent of the Banking Department shall have reason to believe that any savings bank or institution for savings is loading or investing money in violation of its charter or of law, or conducting business in an unsafe manner, it shall be his duty, either ip person, or by one or more competent persons by him appointed, to examine their affairs; and whenever it shall appear to the Superintendent, from such examivation, that any savings bank or institution for savings has been guilty of a violation of its charter or of law, he shall communicate the fact to the AttorneyGeneral, whose duty it shall then become to institute such proceedings against said savings bank or institution for savings, as are now authorized in the case of insolvent corporations. The expense of any such examination shall be paid by the savings bank or institution for savings so examined, in such amount as the Superintendent of the Banking Department shall certify to be just and reasonable.

Sec. 4. No savings banks shall hereafter be required to make an annual report to the Legislature, any provisions in their charier to the contrary notwithstanding.

Sec. 5. The Superintendent of the Banking Department is hereby authorized to employ, from time to time, so many clerks as may be necessary to discharge the duties hereby imposed ; the salary of said clerks shall be paid to them monthly, on his certificate, and upon the warrant of the Controller, out of the treasury; and it shall be the duty of the said Superintendent, in bis annual report to the Legislature, to state the names of the clerks so employed, and the compensation allowed to them severally. .

Sec. 6. It shall be thë duty of the Superintendent to collect all the expenses incurred in the performance of the duty hereby imposed, including the salaries of the clerks, and such expenses shall be defrayed and paid by the savings banks and institutions for savings in proportion to the amount of deposits held by them severally, and when collected, the same shall be paid into the Treasury of the State. 'If any savings bank or institution for savings shall, after due notice, refuse or neglect to pay its proper share of said charges so allotted, then the said Superintendent may maintain an action in his pame of office against such savings bank or institution for savings, for the recovery of such charges.

BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1837, 1847, AND 1857. From the annual report for 1857, by the Secretary of the Treasury, on the condition of the banks throughout the Union, to which are appended tables for a series of years, we have compiled the following statistics, which present a comparative view of the principal features in the reports of the banks in 1837, 1847, and 1857—the returns being made near the 1st January in each year. We have

made the compilation with especial reference to the relative condition of the banks just before the suspension of specie payments in 1837 and 1857, with which we have introduced the statistics of the intermediate decennial period of 1847, when the financial condition of the country was much depressed. The suspensions in New York, which were immediately followed by the banks throughout the Union, took place on 10th May, 1837, and 14th October, 1857 :

1837.
1847.

1857. Number of banks...

634

591

1,283 Number of branches

154
124

133 Number of bapks and branches..

788

716

1,416 Capital paid in.....

$290,772,091 $203,070,622 $370,834,686 Resources Loans and discounts...

525,115,702 310,282,945 684,456,887 Stocks...

12,407,112 20,158,351 69,272,329 Real estate..

19,064,451 21,219,865 26,124,522 Other investments...

10,423,630 12,206,112 5,920,336 Due by other banks..

59,663,910 31,788,641 65,849,205 Notes of other banks.

26,533,527 13,112,467 28,124,008 Specie funds ...

5,366,500 13,789,780 26,081,641 Specie.

37,915,340 35,132,516 58,349,838 LiabilitiesCirculation.....

149,185,890 105,519,766 214,778,822 Deposits

127,397 135 91,792,533 230,351,352 Due to other banks

62,421,118 28,539,888 57,674,333 Otber liabilities...

36,560,289 4,706,077 19,816,850 Aggregate of immediate liabilities, i.e., of

circulat'n, deposits, & dues to oth. b'ks 339,004,193 225,852,187 502,804,507 Agg. of immediate means, i. e., speciespecie funds, notes of other banks, and

sums due from other banks... 139,479,277 93,823,404 177,404,692 Gold & silver in U.S. Treas. depositories

20,006,114 Total specie in b’ks & treas. depositories

78,415,952

THE PROFITS OF JOINT STOCK BANKS IN LONDON. It appears from the reports of the three joint stock banks, recently made, that their profits exceed all former statements. The London and Westminster (which has been, from its commencement, under the management of our esteemed friend, JAMES WILLIAM Gilbart, the author of several very able works on the bistory and principles of banking) divided 18 per cent, with a surplus of £10,271 ; the Union Bank divided 25 per cent, with a surplus of £16,226 ; and the London Joint Stock divided 224 per cent, with a surplus of £9,246. The capital of the first named is £1,000,000 sterling, and of the other two, £600,000 each. With this small amount of capital, little more than £2,000,000 sterling altogether, the three banks hold deposits amounting in the aggregate to the enormous sum of £35,473,000, viz. :London and Westminster...

£13,900,000 Upion ...

10,875,000 Joint Stock..

10,698,000 These figures show an increase of more than six millions sterling upon the corresponding period of last year. The private deposits of the Bank of England are much less than the lowest of the above, which is most likely attributable to the high rate of interest allowed by these establishments.

STATISTICS OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.

cts

13 13

1829.. 1830...

PRICES OF ELEVEN ARTICLES FOR FORTY YEARS. (PREPARED FOR THE MERCHANTS’ MAGAZINE BY DAVID M. BALFOUR, ESQ., OF BOSTON, Mass.)

The figures in the subjoined table indicate the wholesale prices on the 1st day of January in each year. In all cases where the articles are dutiable, short price is indicated. Coffee and tea have been admitted free of duty since 1833 :

B. A. N. 0. Smy Balto.

St. Y'ng Masco dry mid. washMess Mess Cod H.S.

Dom. hyson vado salt'd faired Beef, Pork, fish, flour, Rice, coffee, tean sugar, hides, cott'n, wool, per .

per per per per per per per per Year.

per bbl. quin. bbl. 100 lbs. Ib. Ib. 100 lbs. Ib. lb. Ib.

cts. cts.

cts. cts. 1819.. 15 37 22 50 3 50 9 25 8 37 23 60 14 50 154 281 25 1820.. 9 75 16 00 287 6 12 3 36 21 64 8 12 128

19 16 1821.. 8 62 13 12 2 67 4 12 3 12 221 63

8 55 121 174 18 1822.. 7 75 13 00 3 25 7 26 3 00

204 50 6 25 18 175 14 1823.. 8 00 12 50 2 75 7 75 2 87 187 52 6 12 17

141 1824..

8 12

11 87 2 56 6 81 3 87 134 62 8 63 174 177 1825.. 9 25 13 00 2 87 5 75 3 31 105 55

8 75 161 17 12 1826.. 9 50 12 25 1 94 5 87 3 37

12 61 9 37 147 18 12 1827.. 9 12 13 25 2 35 5 87

3 75

9 $ 49 7 10 157 14 11 1828.. 987 14 12

2 87
6 12 3 19 8 47 9 62

164

124 12 10 25 13 25 2 25

9 00
3 75 7 49

7 05 12} 123 7 9 12 11 75 2 05 537

2 87 61 42 7 80 144 13} 12 1831.. 8 50 12 25 2 37 5 75 262 74 43 5 25

161

13 24 1832.. 10 25 13 75 2 75 6 87 3 12 11 68 5 15 15 104 25 1833. 10 62 14 37 2 56 6 25 3 50 12 68 7 25

121 17 1834.. 10 50 12 00 2 25 6 75

3 00
123 60 5 00 135 157

23 1836.. 10 75 15 50 2 12 5 25 3 25 10 87 6 37 14} 19+ 30 1836.. 10 75 19 00 2 57 7 75 3 25

113 47 6 95 137 187 17 14 50 26 76 3 12 11 25 3 12 114 42

7 07
12
194

21 1838.. 14 25 20 50 8 19 9 30 4 12

7 25 14 12 20 16 00 23 50 3 30 8 69 4 12

5 56 154 16 20 1840..

12 58 14 73 2 37 6 18 3 62 10 57 6 05 144 114 20 10 18 13 21 2 62 5 50 3 62

5 87 167 104

20 1842.. 8 25 9 97 2 00 6 37 3 25

8} 66

3 75 145 10 20 1843.. 6 78 9 41 1 75

4 50
2 87

3 90 127 71 20 1844.. 7 00 10 25

2 50 4 75 250

55 47
3 95 12}

21 1845.. 7 25 9 25 2 37 4 75 3 25

55 55
4 75 114

67 17 1846.. 8 40' 13 25 2 62 6 75 4 75

6 40 12

17 1847.. 900 10 31 3 12 5 50 4 00

6$ 58
7 30 11

117

14 1848.. 8 62 11 75 356

6 50
3 87

4 50 101 91 16 1849.. 11 00 13 75 2 12 5 50 3 25

4 00 9

18 10 00 10 37 2 37 6 25 3 25

105 55

5 05 104 12 14 1851.. 10 00 12 25 2 62 5 25 3 62

108 38 5 15 14 15 19 1852.. 10 00 14 75 2 62 4 75 3 50

4 55 111 93 18 1853.. 13 25 20 50 3 50 6 25 4 62

4 76 145

113

21 14 25 16 25 3 00

7 62
4 50
117 38
4 50 21

11%

23 1855.. 16 25 16 00

2 75
9 62
5 62

5 35

19 103 20 1856.. 14 25 18 76 3 75 9 50 5 37

104 35 7 50 26 115 20 1857.. 15 25 20 50 3 25 7 37 4 50 100 35 9 75 31 145 21 1868.. 14 50 15 62 3 25 5 50

3 75
91 37

5 87 19 10 26

134

1837..

1839..

84 45
95 38

1841..

94 67

57 47

68 62

8}

64 68
57 65

1850..

8$ 38
87 38

1854..

94 35

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IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FROM 1789 TO 1857.

(PREPARED FOR THE MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE BY DAVID M. BALFOUR, ESQ., OF BOSTON.)

The following statement will exbibit the imports and exports under the eleven different tariffs which have been in operation since the
adoption of the Constitution. The first tariff act was passed July 4th, 1789. The present is the twelfth which has been adopted. Since
the adoption of the Constitution, we have employed annually upon an average of one million tons of shipping in foreign commerce, from which
fifteen hundred million dollars profit have accrued to American shipowners. Between August 30th, 1842, and December 1st, 1846, the
United States exported $103,653,173 of breadstuffs to foreign countries :-

-8PECIE.

over

Excess of Excess of
imports exports

Excess of Excess of
Tariff

over

imports over exports over of Continued from

Imports.

Exports. exports. imports. Imported. Exported. exports. imports.
1789 July 4, 1789, to J'ne 30, 1791 $52,200,000 $39,217,197 $12,982,803
1790 June 30, 1791, to J'ne 30, 1794 97,200,000 79,888,903 17,311,097
1794

1794, to 1804 802,807,964 683,166,366 119,641,598
1804

1804, to 1812 719,720,000 636,691,366 173,028,634 1812

1812, to 1816 295,114,274 169,261,643 125,852,631 1816 1816, to

1824 686,530,539 608,607,242 77,923,297 1824 1824, to 1828 349,308,444 331,720,223 17,588,221

$28,672,602 $29.894,923

$1,222,321
1828
1828, to M'ch 3, 1833 403,649,002 359,765,921 43,883,081

32,308,209 23,079,915 $9,228,294
1832 M'ch 3d, 1833, to Aug. 30,1842 1,242,292,887 1,115,617,653 126,675,234

99,455,727 55,309,514 44,146,213 1842 Aug. 30, 1842, to Dec. 1, 1846 481,543,718 498,509,534

16,965,816 46,460,084 20,682,488 25,777,596 1846 Dec'r 1,1846, to J'ne 30, 1857 2,505,168,646 2,429,157,209 76,011,437

73,958,850 341,842,502

267,883,646 Total.

$7,635,535,474 $6,861,603,257 $790,898,033 $16,965,816 $288,855,478 $470,809,342 $79,152,103 $269,105,967

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