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Constitution of Mass. Society for the suppression of Intemperance 55

Eddy's Reasons

62

Huntington's Poem

473
Humphrey's Sermon,-on doing good to the poor

227
Holmes' Sermon

227
More, Hannah, Moral Sketches

459
Roscoe op penal Jurisprudence

162

Sabine's Sermon

124

Stuart's Letters to Mr. Channing

316, 370

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Belfast, Installation at

335
Conversion of the Jews

481
Declaration of the Allied Sovereigns

86
Extracts from French Religious Magazines

159, 237
Evangelical Society of Massachusetts

74, 475

Herald of Peace

162

Harvard College, Theological School

333, 485

Jodo-Chinese Gleaner

Literary Notice

246
Mission to Otaheite

240
Massachusetts Peace Society

78, 485
New Publications

88, 168, 247

Ordinations

166, 245

Obituary.- Francis W. Winthrop

167

Col. Benjamin Pickman

245

Rev. J. Huntington

431

Rev. J. E. Abbot

Miss Sarab Russel

432

Hon. Caleb Strong

432

Religious Tracts

336

Reform in English Prisons

84
Societies.- Massachusetts Bible Society

241

Massachusetts Peace Society

78, 485

Evangelical Missionary Society

Mendicity Society, London

244

Peace Society, London

162

Society for propagating the Gospel

in North America 81

Society for promoting Theological Education at Harvard.

College

333

Theological Seminary in Cambridge

333, 485

Virginia University

85

432

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74,475

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Iy the “ Review of 1818,” which appeared in the No. of this work for December, some remarks and solicitations were introduced, from which it would naturally be inferred, that the writer expected to continue his labours as Editor of the Christian Disciple. It may therefore be proper to say, that such was his expectation at the time of writing the article. But, soon after, bis bealth received a serious injury; and the weight of care and responsibility which bore on bim as the editor of two periodical works, with little aid on which he could regularly depend, was too oppressive. Besides, he was aware that, at sixty years of age, it was in vain to hope for the vigor and energy of youth; especially in one of impaired health, and who had for many years been devoted to unceasing study and inquiry. He therefore resolved to relinquish the care of the Christian Disciple, and to devote himself solely to the work of promoting peace on earth.

It had indeed been the aim of the editor to make the Christian Disciple subservient to the diffusion of beneficent and pacific sentiments, so far as this might comport with its object as a miscellaneous work; and perhaps he may have exceeded the bounds of propriety in the admission of articles wbich seemed to bim adapted to promote the cause of peace. For he is free to confess, that for several years his mind has been so absorbed by the inquiries which relate to war and peace, that it has often been difficult for him te New Series-vol. I.

1

He may,

write on other subjects. Perhaps this circumstance should have induced him to resign the Christian Disciple at an earlier period. But he indulges the hope that nothing has appeared in the work, which will be ultimately injurious to any one; and that the time is approaching, when pacific principles will be more generally and more highly esteemed.

The convictions and impressions under which the Christian Disciple has heretofore been conducted, were distinctly and honestly stated in the “Review of 1818.” They need not be repeated. It may suffice to add, that it was the aim of the editor to conduct the work in a manner corresponding with its title, “The Christian Disciple," and with its motto, “Speaking the truth in love." however, have been liable to the charge of deviating from the rule that he had prescribed to himself, and for which he may need the forgiveness of God, and the candour of his brethren. Both of which he hopes to obtain.

In cordial friendship with all his associates, and with grateful affection to all his patrons, the past editor of the Christian Disciple has resigned the work to the direction of its original proprietors. He is aware that the work is capable of great improvements, and of being enriched with a greater variety of useful articles. He sincerely indulges the hope, that in future it will be conducted with more ability, more prudence, and more of the Christian spirit than has been possessed by him; that it will be the means of illuminating the minds and improving the hearts of many thousands of readers, of uniting the various denominations of Christians in the bonds of that charity which is the end of gospel doctrines and precepts, and that it will thus be the means of preparing multitudes for those regions of light and love, in which party names and distinctions will cease to már the happiness of man. But whatever sball be the future character of the work, the subscriber is no longer responsible.

NOAH WORCESTER. January 16th, 1819.

INTRODUCTION.

The Christian Disciple, though conimenced by a particular class of Christians, was intended to be distinguished from similar works, by proposing as its principal object, not the defence of particular opinions, but the spreading of the candid, toler

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