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Memb, Royal Geographical Society of London, and of the Royal Society of Northern Antiquaries,
Copenhagen; Hon. Memb. of the Natural History Society of Montreal, Canada East; Memb. of
the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia; of the American Antiquarian Society,
Worcester ; of the American Geological Society, New Haven ; Vice-President of the American
Ethnological Society, New York: Hon. Memb. of the New York Historical Society: Hon. Memb.
of the Historical Society of Georgia; President of the Michigan Historical Society; and Hon.
Memb, of the Ohio Historical and Philosophical Society; Cor. Menuh. of the New York Lyceum
of Natural History, and of the Lyceums of Natural History of Troy and Hudson, N. Y.: Memb.
of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia; of the Albany Institute at the State Capitol,
Albany, and a Res. Memb. of the National Institute at Washington; President of the Algic Society
for meliorating the condition of the Native Race in the United States, instituted in 1831; Hon.
Memb. of the Goethean and of the Philo L. Collegiate Societies of Pennsylvania, &c. &c.

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846, by
H E N R Y R. S C H o O L C R A FT,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York.

s w. BENED1 ct, stER, AND PRINT., 16 Spruce Street, New York.

\
"--- "... (V.

MICROFILMED A \
AT HARVARD |

* The White Stone Canoe... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .............................................. 7 * The Lynx and Hare, a Fable .................... ------------------------------ - - - - - - - . . . . . . 9 * Onawutaquotto, or the Worship of the Sun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................. 10 ` shingebiss................... -------- - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----------------------------------------- 13 Names of the American Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................. 15 Shingaba-Wossins, or Image Stones (with a Print) ...................................... . . . . . 17 Pawnee Barbarity ...----------------------------------------------------------... . . . . . 20 - Personal Reminiscences... . . . ------------------- ------------- ------------------------------ 22 Picture Writing among the North American Indians (with a Print).......................... . . . 27 Notice of Grave Creek Mound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - ----------- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------------- ... 35 Geographical Terminology of the United States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -------------------------------- 36 Indian Music, Songs and Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ------------------------------- --------------- 41 * Piskaret, an Algonquin Chief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -----------------------------------. . . . . . . 50 A Wyandot Tradition, recorded by J. H. Kinzie, Esq., under the name of Ho-tshung-rah ..... ... 54 Wood's Account of Indian Women on the Settlement of New England...... ------------------ 57 Chant of Indian Children to the Wa-tai-see, or Fire-Fly.... . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Odjibwa Song... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --------- ---------------- -
Plan and Objects of Inquiry in this Work ...................................

* Personal Reminiscences (Continued)......................................................... 66
Wastashas, an Osage Legend of the Origin of that Tribe .................................... 7
The Smi Catcher, or Exploits of a Pigmy. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................................ 74
Arapata Sapa, a Sioux Legend.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ... ----------------------------------- 7
Mukakee Mindencea, or the Toad Woman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................. 78
Corn Planting and its Incidents... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ------------------------------------- 81

Indian Ideas of the Immortality of the Soul ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..................................
Game of the Bowl (with a Print) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ 85
Reverence and Affection for Parents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............
Andaig Weos, or Crowsflesh-a Biographical Sketch.......................................... 89
Grammatical Observations on the Chippewa Adjective. . . . . . . . . ----------- - - -

_` A Mohegan Tradition of the Southern Origin of the Shawanoes ............................... 105

Era of the Arrival co the French in the Upper Lakes... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................. 107
Faith of a Converted Jossakeed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 108
Scenes and Adventures in the Ozark Mountains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Grave—Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - ----------- ------------------------ 118 Standard of Value in Rude Nations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -------- 118 Ethnology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --------------------------------------------------------------- 110 A Prayer or Psalm in the Indian Tongue, by Mrs. H. R. S.................... -------------- ... 126 Grammatical distinction between the Active and Passive Voice ... . . . . . . . . . ................... 127 Names of the Seasons, &c., in the Odjibwa . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - ---------------- ------------------ 128 Personal Incidents and Impressions of the Red Race. Part I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. 12. Hurtful influence of the example of drinking on the Red Race. . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 135 -- Bosh Kwa Dosh, a Tradition of the Elephant or some large Pachydermata................ --- . 136 The Legend of the Red Head and his two Sons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 139 Wa-wa-be-zo-win, or the Swing... . . . . . . . . . . . -------------------------------------------- ... 146 Personal Reminiscences (Continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ----------- ------------------------- 148 Language of Mexico ... . . . . . . . . . ------------------ -------------- ---------------------- . . . . . 153 Ethnology (Continued). . . . . . . . . . . . . --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------------------------------------ 154 Totem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . . . 172 Scenes and Adventures in the Ozark Mountains (Continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ 17.3

Apothegms, by Hibernicus ---------------------------------------------------------------- 178

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THE following announcement in the First Number of this work, in August, 1844, denotes its origin: “More than thirty years have passed since, by a change of residence from Central to Western New York, the writer was first placed in a position to observe the Red Race of this continent. The public are apprised, that he had devoted several years of this period in exploratory journeys, in the valleys of the Mississippi and the Missouri, before he entered the service of the U. S. Government, as an Agent for these tribes. Two and twenty years of his life, he may add, have been passed in the various capacities of an Executive Agent, a Commissioner, and a Superintendant of Indian Affairs, for the Northern Department. “Having received numerous letters of inquiry from various quarters on this head, since his return from the Eastern Hemisphere to his native State, it is supposed that a general interest may be felt to know something more fully of the results of his experience, observation and adventurous positions, in so wide a field. It is, in truth, to test this opinion, which is not, perhaps, well founded or general, that the following extracts and memoranda, selected from his notes and papers, are published. The design is to continue them sor a few numbers, at convenient intervals, to enable the reader to form his own opinion on the subject. “In making this essay, it was thought appropriate that a title for it should be selected from the language of the people, whose history and traits are brought into discussion. The term Oneóta is the name of one of these aboriginal tribes (the Oneidas). It signifies, in the Mohawk dialect, the people who are sprung from a Rock. It is a term which will do as well as any for the entire race, until we obtain better lights.” In giving to these detached issues a consolidated form, the author has thought that some further notice of his plan and details would not be inappropriate. Some readers have expressed to him strong objections to the retention of the title ONEóTA, as a synonym for the volume; others have been equally candid in their disapproval of the plan of a miscellany; but while he respects the opinions of friends, he has not been able to yield to the force of these objections. No one has so complete a view of the materials at his command, as the author himself. It still appears to him that a term derived from one of the languages of the people who are the subject of remark, is best suited to give individuality to the work; while the materials themselves, being chiefly membra disjecta of his researches and studies in the American forest, naturally assume a miscellaneous aspect. The work is, indeed, essentially a miscellany; its papers are, to a great extent, independent of each other, often diverse in their subject, and owing their character to witnesses living at, or traditions gleaned from, remote places; and no attempt has been made, or was originally designed, to digest them into a compact whole.

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