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tween the ages of four and sixteen years, and at the late visitations, public money in consequence, let us lose it, as we ought to, if we do made between the 30th of October and the 4th of the present Decem. not see that the laws are complied with. But I apprehend there is ber, there were only 319 in the common schools-leaving 622, or no danger of losing the money, if immediate measures are taken, as nearly two-thirds of the whole, without benefit from the public money. there is yet t me to carry out all the requirements of the law. If Some of these attend private schools, and others, no doubi, have the committee who have been appointed refuse to act, let them re. come into the public schools since the visiting. But, still, there are sign, and others be appointed. If the duties imposed on the com. hundreds wlio go to school no where, and who do nothing useful at mittee be too arduous for the compensation, let the School Society home. And these will soon become men and women, and have a ask the select-men to warn a Town Meeting, and ask for such sum share in the managing or mis.managing of public affairs. The wa. as would be necessary for carrying out all the requirements of the ges paid to teachers, this year, cannot be far from $3,000, and all law, and all other regulations deemed necessary, and thereby save other expenses for books and stationery, for fuel, for buildings, re- the society's committee the necessity of violating the law and their pairs, &c. will bring the whole amount to $3,500. All of these ex. honor, in making out a certificate required to obtain the public school penses are now going on, and a set of unusually well qualified teach money. ers are in their places, and yet through the carelessness or willfulness “I say save the society's committee the necessity of violating the of parents and masters, or for some other cause, these hundreds are law and their honor, for as I understand it, the society's committee suffering a daily loss, and through them, the community, and posteri. are required, and do make out a certificate, and send to the Compty also, are suffering, or must eventually suffer, in conseqnence of troller of the State, that the schools in their society have in every the negligence and unfaithfulness of this year. The great diversity way been kept according to law. of books may have attracted attention, and it is well worthy of seri. “Let the report of the committee be published in the newspaper; ous notice. In the schools were found twenty-one different reading let the doings of the society and their officers, be reported ; let the books, and geographies, also, differing so little from each other as community to whom they are responsible, judge; let an efficient and to leave little room for any choice, and yet, so far differing, as that energetic system be adopted, and if the community disapprove of they could not be used together without great disadvantage to both such a course, let them do so by appointing others, or instructing teacher and scholars. But the principal evils under which them how to act. If a man should receive the frowns of the public the cause of education is now suffering among us, arise from for too much zeal, it would be in a praiseworthy cause, and on an the negligence of parents, masters and guardians, and from improper honorable and liberal man it would not inflict a mortal wound." location, and from the uncomfortable, unprotected and unprovided

In Newtown, as well as in other towns in the northern part of the condition of the houses where these teachers and children are sent every day to suffer inconvenience and struggle with difficulty. But county, public addresses have been delivered, and measures adopted want of room compels us to leave these and other topics relating to to awakenya livelier interest in tho whole subject of school improve.

Where are the friends of common school education in schools, without further remarks at this time.

Bridgeport? Are all the children of that enterprising place enjoy.

ing the means of a sound, intellectual and moral training? Are pa. STAMFORD.

rents co-operating with teachers to bring about this desirable re. In a letter which we have lately received from the Vice President sult? Are the school rooms furnished with convenient seats and of the County Association, for this town, it appears that the good desks, &c. &c. people of Stamford are at last " waking up from their slumber over the cause of common school improvement." For this we are much

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. indebted to the zealous and intelligent exertions of the Rev. W. W. Niles, "agent of the American Common School Union," who spent We have received more encouraging intelligence from this a week with us in visiting schools and addressed a public meeting of county during the past month. The following communication our citizens. At a meeting on the 18th of January, the Rev. Mr. from one of the tried friends of common schools, contains Todd made a very forcible and pertinent address, urging to immedi. several valuable suggestions. ate, energetic and persevering action upon all, to redeem the char.

MR. EDITOR: acter of the State, and place Connecticut in that enviable position she once held in the van of other States and countries, on the sub.

Though for several years past I have been comparatively a ject of Common School Education. After the address, a “Town stranger to the state of common school education in ConAssociation” was formed, of which the Hon. Charles Hawley necticut, I cannot, without feeling a lively interest awakened in was made President, and from the names of the several officers who the subject, learn, through your Journal, the late doings of the compose the “ Board of Education," we are satisfied that something Legislature respecting it, and the still more recent county will be done. The Board are to meet at stated periods, and to re- movements growing out of the same. It is evident that the port semi-annually to the Association. We hope the Board will minds of your leading citizens are preparing for still more sysjake immediate steps, in connection with the school visiters, to as- iematic and efficient action in this all-imporiant cause. Might certain the condition of the common schools—how many are not at it not be well, however, before the meeting of the Legislature, any school, &c. &c.

that any new measures likely to be proposed by the Board of

Commissioners of Common Schools, or other friends of educaDANBURY.

tion, should be opened before the people ? Perhaps, too, At an adjourned meeting of the friends of Common Schools, in though your Journal should be more devoted to facis ihan ibethis town, it was decided, instead of forming a "Town Association," ories, it may fall within its scope, to afford a corner to some to appoint a committee of one from each School District “ to invite such brief inquiries as the following. viz. some person or persons, to deliver as often as once a month, public Lectures, at such place as shall from time to time be provided, upon missioners for Common Schools should not be increased to two

1. Is it noi worthy of inquiry, whether the Board of Comthe best method of improving the condition and elevating the character of our common schools, and adopt such other measures as they or three from each county, instead of one only, as it is at preskall deem expedient, to promote the interests of our common sent constituted, to hold their ofices for two or three years ; schools.” This resolution may lead to the happiest results, if intel. one half, or one third, as the case might be, to be appointed ligent men will prepare the Lectures and the commitiee adopt all annually? The principal argument in favor of such inthe measures which are necessary "to promote the interests” of crease, would be, to give more wisdom and greater permanenthe schools. This is all the friends of Associations elsewhere, aim cy to their plans; a single year not affording sufficient time 10 at, and it matters but little whcther they meet together as an asso. make up one's mind judiciously on the many important quesciation, or in society meeting, provided men can be found, whether tions which will naturally come before them, or to carry into as “officers” or as "committee,” who will devote time and thought successful action any syslem of measures which they may deto devise and mature intelligent plans of action. We like very much vise. The same ohjeci might likewsie be secured by suffering the suggestions of a correspondent of the Danbury Times, of the 23d the number of Commissioners to remain as at present, but of January, and hope he will follow up his communications with lengthening their term of office. In favor of the former course, others as spirited. We make the following extracts : "Mr. Editor-As long as we have laws in our statute book, I

it may be urged, however, that the services of more of these, am in favor of enforcing them. I propose that the society's com.

peculiarly qualified by previous experience and interest in the mittee call a meeting of the society; let the society call on the visit: subject, would be secured, as owing to accidental circumstaning and examining committees for a report of their doings. Wheth. ces, several such might be residing in the same county. er they have performed their duty according to law, or not? What

2. Would it not be better to do by law, what it is understood regulations they have imposed on the teachers ? Or, if they have some towns have already done by their own municipal reguladone nothing, to say so, and let the reasons why they have not, be tions, viz. diminish the number of visiters in school districts, reported. Let the report be particular and full, and such a one as and pay them a reasonable compensation for their services, as they, as men of honor, would be bound to make; and if we lose the ' some other town officers ? In this way many worthy individu.

course

als would be induced to give efficient attention to the prescri- it. To carry it into effect, it will be necessary 10 erect a build bed duties of the office, which justice to their own families now ing at some convenient spoi capable of accommodating all above prevents.

ten years of age, the present school houses being deemed ade3. Ought another session of the Legislature be suffered to quate to furnish the necessary accommodations for those ungo by without bringing before it a plan of a seminary for train- der that age, and place the entire management of the whole ing ieachers in some central part of the state, under the direc- under the charge of individuals elected annually by the districts, tion of the Board of Commissioners of Common Schools ? In- whose business it should be, not only to perform ihe duries deto this might be admitted gratuitously all who propose to make volving on the school committee under the present plan, but school keeping a profession. Perhaps, too, in coming time, also to designate what schools each scholar should Iaitend, some system, adapied to our republican institutions, and bor- 'taking the entire management of them : should'the views of the rowing hints from Prussia and other European countries, society coincide with those of the committee, a meeting of the might be devised for transplanting to this public nursery the inhabitants of each district might be legally warned to make most promising shoots from our village gardens.

application to this society to consolidate them into one, and XENOS.

also to appoint a committee through whom they may apply Haddam, Dec. 17, 1838.

10 the legislature at its next session to grant them the requisite

power to carry the plan into execution. All of which is respectMIDDLETOWN.

fully submitied. At an adjourned meeting of the First School Society of Mid

By order of the committee. dletown, the following additional steps were taken towards or

SAMUEL D. HUBBARD, Chairman. ganizing anew the Schools for that society.

The following resolution was offered, read and adopted. In pursuance of the resolution of the last meeting of this

Resolved, That it be and is hereby recommended to the Sociely, directing the Committee to present a plan for the re- Committee of the North, North Middle, South Middle, and organization of the four districts, and the improvement of the South School Districts in this Society, to warn a school disschools within the same, respectfully report:

trict meeting in their respective districts, to take the sense of From the statistical facts presenied io the last meeting it the inhabitants on the expediency of consolidating the four appears that of the 835 children who draw the public money, districts into one: and also, to appoint a committee with power only about one third, or 276 attend the district schools at a to take such measures on behalf of the districts they represent, charge of nearly five dollars for each scholar, and that of the in connection with the committee from the other districts as remaining 539–311 attend private schools at a charge of a tri- they may think best, to improve the schools and advance the fle over fourteen dollars each, and the remaining 248 are either of education within ihe same. taught at home or left in ignorance; it further appears that al Voted, That a committee be appointed to apply to each Disthough only about one third of the 835 receive any benefit from trict Committeeman in the four Districts within the City, to the public money, yet that the schools are as large and in some carry into effect the foregoing Resolution. And Samuel D. instances larger than can under their present organization, em- Hubbard, Harvey Treadway, Cha's Woodward, and John B. bracing as they do scholars of all ages and various attainments, Southmayd, Esqrs. were appointed said Committee. be properly taught. In reorganizing the four districts our ob

Voted, That the clerk of this sociely cause the proceedings jeci is not merely to provide schools for the whole $35, but al of this meeting to be published in the papers printed in the so to provide such schools as will afford them the best facili- City of Middleiown. ties for obtaining an education at the cheapest rale. To effect

Voted, That this meeting be adjourned without day. this it is necessary in the opinion of the committee, 10 classify

Atiest. STEPHEN TAYLOR, Clerk. them ,placing those of sinilarage and attainments in the same schools, and the whole as far as practicable under female in

NEW HAVEN COUNTY. structors. Pursuing this principle, and assuming that the statistical facts before reported are correct, they offer the follow The following circular was addressed by the President of ing as exhibiting the general outline of a plan, the alteration of the county association, to the several genilemen who are apwhich may be varied at pleasure. The returns made from the pointed by the county convention. district schools of the relative ages of the 276 that attend them, shew that about one third only are above ten years of age. If Convention, held in this city on the 13th inst., you were appointed a

Dear Sir :-You are hereby notified, that by the Common School this can be considered as a correct standard by which to judge Vice President of the County Association then formed for the im. of the relative ages of the whole $35, we shall have about 275 provement of Common Schools. above ten and 560 urder ten, the latter may be placed in ten Permit me to call your attention to some of the modes in which schools of fifty six scholars each, under female instructors, at your appointment will enable you to render efficient service to the an average price of fourteen dollars per month, which at eleven cause of popular education. months to the year, allowing of one month for vacation, would Will it not be expedient for you to call a public meeting in your amount to 1450 dollars-of the 275 above len, one half or 137 town, of parents, school committees, and other friends of education, may be considered females, and divided into two schools at an and to present at such meeting for consideration, the subject of im. expense of 600 dollars a year for instruction, the other half being provement in our public schools, and to obtain from gentlemen in the boys, may also be placed in two schools under competent in- several districts, statements of the condition and prospects of each structors at an expense of 1200 dollars a year.

district school ? Can you not, at such meeting, cause a town associ. The expense of the whole would be as follows.

ation to be formed, auxiliary to the county association, with a Vico

President in each hanilet, or neighborhood in your town, whose du. For all under ten years of age $1,450 All females over ten

ty it shall be to ascertain the nanies of the children between the ages 600

of four and sixteen years, in the part allotted to him-how many at. All Males over len

tend the public schools-how long each attends—how many attend Writing Master at a salary of 360 $3610

private schools-how many none at all-and what is the reason of

such n:n-attendance in the case of each child of a proper age; and Deduct the public money estimated at 1377

present to the town association the facts thus ascertained, and other

facts on this subject, which may come to his knowledge? Will it And we have $2,233

not be practicable and useful for you, in connexion with the Vice together with the incidental expenses of the schools which President of the proposed town association, to ascertain the age, and would increase it probably to $2500,-10 be provided in such a parricular education of each teacher of a public school in your town, mapper as the disiric: might deem best, by a tax on the grand and the compensation allowed to each—the time which each school levy, or a capitation tax, or partly by both-a capitation iax or is continued, and the average attendance of the scholars—the branch. three dollars would raise $2,505, — but as there are some among books used-ihe condition of each school house, as whether provi.

es of knowledge taught in each school, and the number and kinds of us to whom even this would be a burthen, and whose taxes it ded with adequate means of ventilation-with proper seats, out hou. would be necessary to abate, the deficiency occuring under and other conveniencies—whether the schools are visited by such abatement might be raised by a tax on the grand levy. parents and others, and also by the visiting committee at the com.

The Committee would be understood as presenting the above mencement and close of each season of schooling-whether each merely as the general outline of a plan, exhibiting the principle teacher is thoroughly examined, and has a certificate before the school of classification and the resulis thai might be expected io attend is begun, and to see that all such information having been first re.

1,200

ses,

ported to your town association, be condensed and arranged by the enjoy the advantages of a specific course of study and of trainsecretary thereof, and presented to the county association? Caning for their sulure employments. This was the first provision you not, in connexion with the Vice President of your town associa- ever made in this country' by any state for the education of tion, and without any obtrusion, or improper interference, co.operate cominon school teachers—and although these departments canwith, assist and encourage the several school committees in the per- not be compared with regularly organized normal schools, or formance of their duties? Can you not, as you have opportunity, teachers seminaries with moral schools atiached, still they converse with the people personally, to awaken a just attention to common schools, as they effect the common prosperity of the town,

have already done inuch good, and their happy influence will and of the state, and to induce parents to visit the schools, and to take be more and more felt as they hecome more widely introduced : a personal interest in the improvement of their children? May it We shall give a more particular account of what has been not be judicious to present it to the association in your town, as wor. done for the education of teachers in this state in our next thy of serious enquiry, whether a classification and gradation, may number-and shall here present a view of her school system, * not be introduced among the schools in your town, so as to secure a as given by Hon. John A. Dix, in his report as superintendent school of higher order, with a more highly qualified teacher for the of common schools made in 1836, abridged in some particumore advanced children, while females instruct the younger ? lars, and incorporating a few alterations made since the date

Will you not immediately take measures to secure a full cir- of his report, iogether with some suggestions and information culation of the Connecticut Common School Journal in every embraced in bis circular explaining the law of 1838: we shall neighborhood in your town?

subjoin an extract of Gov. Seward's late message, exhibiting By these, and other efforts which will readily suggest them- the present condition of the schools. selves, you will raise for yourself an enduring monument in the hearts of many, and may exert an influence in favor of pop

Superintendence. ular education which in its results, will extend beyond the lapse The secretary of state is, by virtue of Inis office, superintendent of of time.

common schools. LEONARD BACON. His duties are:

1. To submit to the legislature an annual report; exhibiting the con. We cannot even notice all that has been done or is now do- dition of the common school fund, and of the schools, and all such ing in the several towns of this county. In many of them, a matters relating to his office and the schools as he may deem expedient very lively interest is felt, and

a judicious course of action is to communicate. pursued. 'In Woodbridge, Dr. Goodsell, who is a visiter and several towns and cities of the state. The apportionment is made ac

2. To apportion the income of the common school fund among the Vice President of the county association, has taken up the cording to the ratio of their population, compared with the population cause in the right-way. He causes public notice to be given of the whole state. The census is taken once in ten years by act of from the pulpit on the Sabbaib, what school the committee congress, and on every alternate fifth year by the state, so that a new would visit during the week, with a general invitation to the apportionment is made once in five years. When a new town is createachers in the town to be present in the afternoon, and for ted, an apportionment is made between it and the towns from which it all others interested in education, to meet the commiliee at the was formed, according to the best evidence in the power of the superio. school house in the eveniny. These invitations were very gen- tendent. The basis, which he has been accustomed to assume in such very full and interesting. This course was continued through children are annually enumerated in every town, it affords the most erally complied with, and the evening meetings especially were cases, is the number of children between the ages of five and sixteen all the districts in the town, and with increasing interest on ready criterion for determining the amouni of money which the several the part of the people. For the last three or four of the meet- parts of the territory in question should receive; and on the score of ings, the attendance was so large that the school houses were equity, is as free from objection as the ratio of population. To this filled to overflowing. A deep interest has thus been excited standard, however, all such cases must be brought after the next ensuing throughout the town in favor of public schools, and upon the census is taken. subject of education generally.

3. To prepare suitable forms and regulations, for making all reports,

and conducting all proceedings, under the title of the statutes relating A public examination of all the schools in the town will be to common schools, and to transmit them, " with such instructions as held early next spring.

he shall deem necessary and proper for the better organization and government of common schools,' to the officers concerned in the ad

ministration of the system. TOLLAND COUNTY.

Under this provision a very important question has arisen-whether

it confers on the superintendent auihority to give his advice or directions It is in contemplation to call a meeting of the "county as- as 10 the course of study to be pursued, or the books to be used in comsociation,” at three of the most convenient points in the coun- mon schools. The present superintendent, and his predecessor in ty. We hope it will be done. The schools, even during the office, have acted upon the assumption that it was not intended 10 conpresent winier, will feel the influence of such popular move- fer such power. ments. The following topics were presented and commented

4. The superintendent has an appellate jurisdiction in all matters of Upon, in a public meeting in Tolland. 1. The responsibility appeal arising under the statute relating to common schools

. The suof teachers as connected with their daily duties. 2. The pro- concerning any "matter under the present title, (which includes the

preme court has said that any person conceiving himself aggrieved per government of the school. 3. The manner of teaching, whole of the school act,) may appeal to the superintendent of common and care of books, school room, &c. 4. The moral influence schools, whose decision shall be final. This provision was intended of the teachers in the community.

for what it practically is, a cheap and expeditious mode of settling most, if not all the difficulties and disputes arising in the course of the execu

tion of the law. A common law certiorari would no doubt lie from NEW YORK COMMON SCHOOL SYSTEM. this court, to the trustees (of a school district) to bring up and correct

any erroneous proceeding not concluded by an adjudication of the suNew York enjoys and deserves the high credit of having perintendent, or in a case where his powers were inadequate to give done more in a short time to build up an efficient system of the relief to which the party was entitled.”. common schools than any of her sister republics. She com

This construction is in accordance with the terms of the statute, menced later than Massachusetts or Connecticut, but she is which are very broad, and were probably designed to give him the now quoted throughout the country for a more liberal, and power of putting at rest all controversies arising in the administration thorough patronage of all her institutions of learning, than either matters of appeal is final, and every case brought before him is disposed

of the system of which he has the supervision. His decision in all of them. Her academies and colleges are all brought under of without expense to the parties, excepting such as is incurred in the the active supervision of the state, and constitute a part of her preparation of their papers, which are, however, always received with. system of public instruction. She has a fund sel apart for the out regard to form, if they are in substance correct. encouragement of their higher institutions, and a board of intel. In conferring this jurisdiction of the officer having charge of the ligent and distinguished men, called the “Regents of the common schools, the leading object was to provide for the regular exeUniversity” – to whom is entrusted its application. Their cution of the laws by which the system is governed, and for a prompt annual report, constitutes a valuable addition to the cause of settlement of all questions arising under them. When it is considered education in our country. She engrafted by her law of 1934, that we have more than ten thousand school districts, and that every and the ordinance of the Regents in 1835, upon eight of her disputed question is liable to be brought, and is in fact, almost always

brought before him for a decision, it must be manifest that the cor academies, a teachers' department, where those who purpose attendance of the superintendent is necessary at the seat of gorernment, Lo engage as teachers in the common schools of the state, may In this part of the administration of the system, he ran delive no aid

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als would be induced to give efficient attention to the prescri- it. To carry it into effect, it will be necessary to erect a build bed duties of the office, which justice to their own families now ing at some convenient spoi capable of accommodating all above prevents.

ten years of age, the present school houses being deemed ade3. Ought another session of the Legislature be suffered to quate to furnish the necessary accommodations for those ungo by without bringing before it a plan of a seminary for train- der that age, and place the entire management of the whole ing ieachers in some central part of the state, under the direc- under the charge of individuals elected annually by the districts, tion of the Board of Commissioners of Common Schools ? In- whose business it should be, not only to perform the duties deto this might be admitted gratuitously all who propose to make volving on the school committee under the present plan, but school keeping a profession. Perhaps, too, in coming time, I also to designate what schools each scholar should Iaitend, some system, adapted to our republican institutions, and bor-taking the entire management of them :should'the views of the rowing hints from Prussia and other European countries, society coincide with those of the committee, a meeting of the might be devised for transplanting to this public nursery the inhabitants of each district might be legally warned to make most promising shoots from our village gardens.

application to this society to consolidate them into one, and XENOS.

also to appoint a committee through whom they may apply Haddam, Dec. 17, 1833.

to the legislature at its next session to grant them the requisite

power to carry the plan into execution. All of which is respectMIDDLETOWN:

fully submitied. At an adjourned meeting of the First School Society of Mid

By order of the committee. dletown, the following additional steps were taken towards or

SAMUEL D. HUBBARD, Chairman. ganizing anew the Schools for that society.

The following resolution was offered, read and adopted. In pursuance of the resolution of the last meeting of this

Resolved, That it be and is hereby recommended to the Sociely, directing the Committee to present a plan for the re- Committee of the North, North Middle, South Middle, and organization of the four districts, and the improvement of the South School Districts in this Society, to warn a school disschools within the same, respectfully report:

trict meeting in their respective districts, to take the sense of From the statistical facts presenied io the last meeting it the inhabitants on the expediency of consolidating the four appears that of the $35 children who diaw the public money, districts into one: and also, to appoint a committee with power only about one third, or 276 attend the district schools at a to take such measures on behalf of the districts they represent, charge of nearly five dollars for each scholar, and that of the in connection with the committee from the other districts as remaining 559–311 attend private schools at a charge of a tri- they may think best, to improve the schools and advance the fle over fourteen dollars each, and the remaining 248 are either course of education within ihe same. taught at home or left in ignorance ; it further appears that al Voted, That a committee be appointed to apply to each Disthough only about one third of the 835 receive any benefit from trict Committeeman in the four Districts within the City, to the public money, yet that the schools are as large and in some carry into effect the foregoing Resolution. And Samuel D. instances larger than can under their present organization, em- Hubbard, Harvey Treadway, Cha's Woodward, and John B. bracing as they do scholars of all ages and various attainments, Southmayd, Esqrs. were appointed said Committee. be properly taught. In reorganizing the four districts our ob Voted, That ihe clerk of this society cause the proceedings jeci is not merely to provide schools for the whole $35, but al- of this meeting to be published in the papers printed in the so to provide such schools as will afford them the best facili- City of Middletown. ties for obtaining an education at the cheapest rate. To effect

Voted, That this meeting be adjourned without day. this it is necessary in the opinion of the committee, 10 classify

Atiest. STEPHEN TAYLOR, Clerk. them ,placing those of sinilarage and attainments in the same schools, and the whole as far as practicable under female instructors. Pursuing this principle, and assuming that the sta

NEW HAVEN COUNTY. vistical facts before reported are correct, they offer the follow The following circular was addressed by the President of ing as exhibiting the general outline of a plan, the alteration of the county association, to the several gentlemen who are apwhich may be varied at pleasure. The returns made from the pointed by the county convention. district schools of the relative ages of the 276 that attend then, shew ibat about one third only are above ten years of age. If Convention, held in this city on the 13th inst., you were appointed a

Dear Sir :—You are hereby notified, that by the Common School this can be considered as a correct standard by which to judge Vice President of the County Association then formed for the im. of the relative ages of the whole 835, we shall have about 275 provement of Common Schools. above ten and 560 urder ten, the latter may be placed in ten Permit me to call your attention to some of the modes in which schools of fifty six scholars each, under female instructors, at your appointment will enable you to render efficient service to the an average price of fourteen dollars per month, wbich at eleven cause of popular education. months to the year, allowing of one month for vacation, would Will it noi be expedient for you to call a public meeting in your amount to 1450 dollars-of the 275 above len, one hall or 137 town, of parents, school committees, and other friends of education, may be considered females, and divided into iwo schools at an and to present at such meeting for consideration, the subject of im. expense of 600 dollars a year for instruction, the other balf being provement in our public schools, and to obtain from gentlemen in the boys, may also be placed in two schools under competent in- several districts, statements of the condition and prospects of each structors at an expense of 1200 dollars a year.

district school? Can you not, at such meeting, cause a town associ. The expense of the whole would be as follows.

ation to be formed, auxiliary to the county association, with a Vice For all under ten years of age $1,450

President in each hanulet, or neighborhood in your town, whose du.

ty it shall bo to ascertain the names of the children between the ages All females over ten

600

of four and sixteen years, in the part allotted to him-how many at. All Males nyer len

1,200

tend the public schools, how long each attends—how many attend Writing Master at a salary of 360 $3610

private schools—how many none at all—and what is the reason of

such nn-attendance in the case of each child of a proper age; and Deduct the public money estimated at 1377

present to the town association the facts thus ascertained, and other

facts on this subject, which may come to his knowledge? Will it And we have $2,233

not be practicable and useful for you, in connexion with the Vice together with the incidental expenses of che schools which President of the proposed town association, to ascertain the age, and would increase it probably lo $2500,-10 be provided in such a parricular education of each teacher of a public school in your town, manner as the distric: might deem best, by a tax on the grand is continued, and the average attendance of the scholars—the branch.

and the compensation allowed to each-ihe time which each school levy, or a capitation tax, or partly by both-a capitation tax of three dollars would raise $2,505,—but as there are some among books used—the condition of each school house, as whether provi.

es of knowledge taught in each school, and the number and kinds of us to whom even this would be a burthen, and whose taxes it ded with adequate means of ventilation—with proper seats, out hou. would be necessary to abate, the deficiency occuring under ses, and other conveniencies—whether the schools are visited by such abatement might be raised by a tax on the grand levy. parents and others, and also by the visiting committee at the com.

The Committee would be understood as presenting the above mencement and close of each season of schooling-whether each merely as the general outline of a plan, exhibiting the principle teacher is thoroughly examined, and has a certificate before the school of classification and the results thai might be expected io attend is begun, and to see that all such information having been first re.

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ported to your town association, be condensed and arranged by the enjoy the advantages of a specific course of study and*of trainsecretary thereof, and presented to the county association? Can ing for their future employments. This was the first provision you not, in connexion with the Vice President of your town associa- ever made in this country by any state for the education of tion, and without any obtrusion, or improper interference, co-operate cominon school teachers—and although these departments canwith, assist and encourage the several school committees in the per not be compared with regularly organized normal schools, or formance of their duties? Can you not, as you have opportunity, teachers seminaries with moral schools attached, still they converse with the people personally, to awaken a just attention to common schools, as they effect the common prosperity of the town, have already done inuch good, and their happy influence will and of the state, and to induce parents to visit the schools, and to take be more and more felt as they hecome more widely introduced: a personal interest in the improvement of their children? May it We shall give a more particular account of what has been not be judicious to present it to the association in your town, as wor. done for the education of teachers in this stale in our next thy of serious enquiry, whether a classification and gradation, may number-and shall here present a view of her school system, not be introduced among the schools in your town, so as to secure a as given by Hon. John A. Dix, in his report as superintendeni school of higher order, with a more highly qualified teacher for the of common schools made in 1836, abridged in some particumore advanced children, while females instruct the younger ? lars, and incorporating a few alterations made since the date

Will you not immediately take measures to secure a full cir- of his report, iogether with some suggestions and information culation of the Connecticut Common School Journal in every embraced in bis circular explaining the law of 1838: we shall neighborhood in your town?

subjoin an extract of Gov. Seward's late message, exhibiting By these, and other efforts which will readily suggest them- the present condition of the schools. selves, you will raise for yourself an er during monument in the hearts of many, and may exert an influence in favor of pop

Superintendence. ular education which in its results, will extend beyond the lapse The secretary of state is, by virtue of Iris office, superintendent of of lime.

common schools. LEONARD BACON. His duties are:

1. To submit to the legislature an annual report; exhibiting the conWe cannot even notice all that has been done or is now do- dition of the common school fund, and of the schools, and all such ing in the several towns of this county. In many of them, a

matters relating to his office and the schools as he may deem expedient very lively interest is felt, and a judicious course of action is to communicate. pursued. 'In Woodbridge, Dr. Goodsell, who is a visiter and several towns and cities of the state.

2. To apportion the income of the common school fund among the

The apportionment is made acVice President of the county association, has taken up the cording to the ratio of their population, compared with the population cause in the right-way. He causes public notice to be given of the whole state. The census is taken once in ten years by act of from the pulpit on the Sabbaıb, what school the committee congress, and on every alternate fifth year by the state, so thai a new would visit during the week, with a general invitation to the apportionment is made once in five years. When a new town is createachers in the town to be present in the afternoon, and for ted, an apportionment is made between it and the towns from which it all others interested in education, to meet the committee at the

was formed, according to the best evidence in the power of the superio. school house in the evening. These invitations were very gen- cases, is the number of children between the ages of five and sixteen

tendent. The basis, which he has been accustomed 10 assume in such erally complied with, and the evening meetings especially were very full and interesting. This course was continued through years, residing within each portion of the divided territory. As the

children are annually enumerated in every town, it affords the most all the districts in the town, and with increasing interest on ready criterion for determining the amount of money which the several the part of the people. For the last three or four of the meet- parts of the territory in question should receive; and on the score of ings, the attendance was so large that the school houses were equity, is as free from objection as the ratio of population. To this filled to overflowing. A deep interest has thus been excited standard, however, all such cases must be brought after the next ensuing throughout the town in favor of public schools, and upon the census is taken. subject of education generally,

3. To prepare suitable forms and regulations, for making all reports, A public examination of all the schools in the town will be to common schools, and to transmit them, " with such instructions as

and conducting all proceedings, under the title of the statutes relating held early next spring.

he shall deem necessary and proper for the better organization and government of common schools,' to the officers concerned in the ad

ministration of the system. TOLLAND COUNTY.

Under this provision a very important question has arisen—whether

it confers on the superintendent authority to give his advice or directions It is in contemplation to call a meeting of the county as as to the course of study to be pursued, or the books to be used in comsociation,” at three of the most convenient points in the coun- mon schools. The present superintendent, and his predecessor in ty. We hope it will be done. The schools, even during the office, have acted upon the assumption that it was not intended 10 conpresent winter, will feel the influence of such popular move- fer such power. ments. The following topics were presented and commented

4. The superintendent has an appellate jurisdiction in all matters of upon, in a public meeting in Tolland. 1. The responsibility appeal arising under the statute relating to common schools

. The suof teachers as connected with their daily duties. 2. The pro-concerning any “matter under the present title, which includes the per government of the school. 3. The manner of teaching, whole of ihe school act,) may appeal to the superintendent of common and care of books, school room, &c. 4. The moral influence schools, whose decision shall be final. This provision was intended of the teachers in the community.

for what it practically is, a cheap and expeditious mode of settling most, if not all the difficulties and disputes arising in the course of the execu

tion of the law. A common law certiorari would no doubt lie from NEW YORK COMMON SCHOOL SYSTEM.

this court, to the trustees (of a school district) 10 bring up and correct

any erroneous proceeding not concluded by an adjudication of the suNew York enjoys and deserves the high credit of having perintendent, or in a case where his powers were inadequate to give done more in a short time to build up an efficient system of the relief to which the party was entitled.” common schools than any of her sister republics. She com

This construction is in accordance with the terms of the statute, menced later than Massachusetts or Connecticut, but she is which are very broad, and were probably designed to give him the now quoted throughout the country for a more liberal, and power of putting at rest all controversies arising in the administration thorough patronage of all her institutions of learning, than either

of the system of which he has the supervision. His decision in all

matters of appeal is final, and every case brought before him is disposed of ther. Her academies and colleges are all brought under of without expense to the parties, excepting such as is incurred in the the active supervision of the state, and constitute a part of her preparation of their papers, which are, however, always received withsystem of public instruction. She has a fund sel apart for the out regard to form, if they are in substance correct. encouragement of their higher institutions, and a board of intel In conferring this jurisdiction of the officer having charge of the ligent and distinguished men, called the “Regents of the common schools, the leading object was to provide for the regular exeUniversity"-10 whom is entrusted its application. Their cution of the laws by which the system is governed, and for a prompt annual report, constitutes a valuable addition to the cause of settlement of all questions arising under them. When it is considered education in our country. She engrafted by her law of 1934, that we have more than ten thousand school districts, and that every and the ordinance of the Regents in 1835, upon eight of her disputed question is liable to be brought, and is in fact, almost always

brought before him for a decision, it must be manifest that the constant academies, a teachers' department, where those who purpose attendance of the superiniendent is necessary at the seat of government, to engage as teachers in the common schools of the state, may' In this part of the administration of the system, he ran delive no aid

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