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the importance of having men duly not with anything like proper zeal—it qualified to exercise such important being nothing unusual to find, on the functions, becomes at once apparent. eve of an election, that men who have Notwithstanding this-notwithstand- possessed the necessary qualification ing the exceedingly questionable ex. for years, have never given themercise, on more than one occasion, of selves the trouble of applying to be their patronage on the part of Dissent placed on the roll. Not so is it with ing majorities - both Conservatives our opponents, who neglect no opporand Whigs (we speak of the old re- tunity of adding to their electoral spectable party) seem content to strength. On the occasion of an abandon the municipal field almost election, almost every man of them entirely to the Radicals and Seceders. registers his vote ; and further, they We do not write this without a serious spare no trouble in the preliminary purpose. We think that now is the work of the canvass. They have a time, when the result of previous distinct object to gain, and they exert supineness is made apparent to them themselves as if the success depended in more than one important place, to upon the individual efforts of each. warn the Conservatives that, in hang- Whereas, among many of the Consering back from participation in muni. vatives, there is a degree of apathy cipal matters, they are, in fact, giving which is almost unaccountable. Some direct influence and political power men cannot be brought to vote at all, to their most bitter and malignant either because they are actuated by adversaries. If proper men were whim, or are influenced by some perfound to discharge the civic offices, sonal considerations relating to the the democratic influence at urban candidates. One man will not vote elections would be most materially against a particular Liberal, because diminished. It is utterly preposterous he has known him from his youth upto suppose that if men of education, wards. Another will not vote for a character, and position, came forward Conservative candidate, because he as candidates for the civic representa, has had some squabble with him retion, they would not, in the majority garding railway matters. Another of instances, be preferred to the sorry does not think that Lord Derby will specimens of administrative intellect get a working majority in the new who now constitute the majority of Parliament, and therefore he declines our civic councillors. We have no to put his shoulder to the wheel. We wish to dilate on this topic, which, need not comment upon the weakness, perhaps, is rather foreign to our sub- but we desire to point out the gross ject. It is, however, one of great folly and miserable effects of such importance, which the electors would conduct. This is no ordinary crisis. do well to consider before the recur Upon the success of Lord Derby derence of another period of municipal pends the maintenance of Constituchange. We do not say broadly that tional and Protestant principles in this the constitutional battle is to be fought country; and every vote which is at the civic polling-booths; but we do withheld or thrown away adds to the say this, that, by neglecting the lat- chances of our adversaries. It is a ter, and by not assuming their fair scandalous thing that a Conservative sbare of municipal responsibility and voter, under any circumstances, should action, the constitutional party are require persuasion to perform what is yearly losing ground in our cities and his manifest duty. If private consilarger towns, and subjecting them- derations are to be allowed to interselves to the recurrence of periodical fere, when candidates are fairly in political defeat.

the field-if personal pique, or perIn one other respect, those electors sonal motives, are to be deemed more who wish well to the constitutional weighty than the claims of principle cause ought to take a lesson from the —if indolence and apathy are carried conduct of their opponents. The Ra- to such an extent that registered dicals and Dissenters—we need hardly voters, of known opinions, will not add, the Papists—are always upon take the trouble of even going to the the alert. They keep up their regis poll-how can it be expected that the trations, wbich the Conservatives do Government will be able to make head

We re

that

against an active, fierce, and unscru- Nationality on the one side, and Cogpulous democracy? There is but one mopolitanism on the other. rule to be observed on such occasions peat, as we have said before, that, as the present. Let no man calculate should Lord Derby fail in commandchances for himself, nor regulate his ing a majority in the House of Comconduct according to his anticipations mons, the return of the Whigs to of the result of the contest. Wher- power, in the same position and on ever a Conservative candidate-one the same principles as before, is absowho will generally support the pre- lutely impossible. We must, in that sent Government, and uphold our case, expect that all the parties who Protestant institutions is in the are at present using their utmost field, let him have the cordial, strenu- influence to obtain a return bostile to ous, and early support of every Con- her Majesty's Ministers, will be represervative voter. If, in the mind of sented in the next Cabinet; and any, there exist personal objections should that event occur, it requires to a candidate, let these be generously no prophet to foresee that the most waived, on the consideration that it reckless changes, and the most disis not the man, but the cause, astrous results, must inevitably occur. they are called upon to support. Any But we have little fear for the issue. show of lukewarmness at such a If the Conservatives bestir themtime has the effect of damping the selves boldly and with becoming spirit spirits and chilling the enthusiasm of —if the right-thinking men throughthe more ardent and energetic of the out the country who know the value party ; it inspires our opponents with of the blessings which they enjoy, and confidence, and, in many cases, may who are opposed to organic change, materially contribute to their success. make their voices distinctly heardAnd now we have done. Late as the they constitute a body more numerperiod is, we are not without hope ous and infinential than that which that the observations which we have is opposed to them, and which, even ventured to make may be useful in now, is making the most desperate confirming the minds of some, and in exertions to obtain a majority in Paropening the eyes of others, to the liament. Let us, on the other side, vast importance of the contest which be resolute and active-let us comis about to take place. We cannot port ourselves as becomes the greatoverrate its magnitude. This is the ness and the dignity of our cause-grand struggle between Constitutional and most assuredly we shall be able principle and Democratic ambition to defeat that foul and unnational between Protestantism and Popery, coalition which has dared to menace now all the more dangerous, because the integrity of Church and State, of we find it in intimate alliance with the Protestant faith, and of the timeLiberalism and Infidelity – between honoured institutions of the realm.

Printed by William Blackwood & Sons, Edinburgh.

BLACKWOOD'S

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCCXLII.

AUGUST, 1852.

against an active, fierce, and unscru- Nationality on the one side, and Cospulous democracy? There is but one mopolitanism on the other. We rerule to be observed on such occasions peat, as we have said before, that, as the present. Let no man calculate should Lord Derby fail in commandchances for himself, nor regulate his ing a majority in the House of Comconduct according to his anticipations mons, the return of the Whigs to of the result of the contest. Wher- power, in the same position and on ever a Conservative candidate-one the same priaciples as before, is abso. who will generally support the pre- lutely impossible. We must, in that sent Government, and uphold our case, expect that all the parties who Protestant institutions — is in the are at present using their utmost field, let him have the cordial, strenu- influence to obtain a return hostile to ous, and early support of every Con- her Majesty's Ministers, will be represervative voter. If, in the mind of sented in the next Cabinet ; and any, there exist personal objections should that event occur, it requires to a candidate, let these be generously no prophet to foresee that the most waived, on the consideration that it reckless changes, and the most disis not the man, but the cause, that astrous results, must inevitably occur. they are called upon to support. Any Bat we have little fear for the issue. show of lukewarmness at such & If the Conservatives bestir them. time has the effect of damping the selves boldly and with becoming spirit spirits and chilling the enthusiasm of -if the right-thinking men throughthe more ardent and energetic of the out the country who know the value party; it inspires our opponents with of the blessings which they enjoy, and confidence, and, in many cases, may who are opposed to organic change

, materially contribute to their success. make their voices distinctly beardAnd now we have done. Late as the they constitute a body more numerperiod is, we are not without hope ous and influential than that which that the observations which we have is opposed to them, and which, even ventured to make may be useful in now, is making the most desperate confirming the minds of some, and in exertions to obtain a majority in Paropening the eyes of others, to the liament. Let us, on the other side, vast importance of the contest which be resolate and active–let us comis about to take place. We cannot port ourselves as becomes the great

ness and the dignity of our canse

VOL. LXXII.

CONTENTS,

133

DIES BOREALES. No IX. CHRISTOPAER UNDER CANVASS, From STAMBOUL TO Tabriz, KATIE STEWART, A TRUE STORY. Part II., GOLD-EMIGRATION-FOREIGN DEPENDENCE--TAXATION, Tax MOOR AND THE Loch, My NOVEL ; OR, VARIETIES IN English LIFE. PART XXIII., THE EARL OF DERBY'S APPEAL TO THE COUNTRY,

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overrate its magnitude. This is the grand struggle between Constitutional and most assuredly we shall be able principle and Democratic ambition— to defeat that foul and unsational between Protestantism and Popery, coalition which has dared to menace now all the more dangerous, because the integrity of Church and State, of we find it in intimate alliance with the Protestant faith, and of the timeLiberalism and Infidelity between honoured institutions of the realm.

EDINBURGH:
WILLIAM BLACKWOOD & SONS, 45 GEORGE STREET;

AND 37 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.
To whom all communications (post paid) must be addressed.

SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY WILLIAM BLACK WOOD AND SONS, EDINBURGH.

and & Sons, Edinlurgh.

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NORTH. THE great Epic Poets of Antiquity began with invoking superhuman aid to their human powers. They magnified their subject by such a confession, that their unassisted strength was unequal to worthily treating it; and it is perfectly natural for us to believe that they were sincere in these implorations. For their own belief was that Gods presided over, ruled, and directed, not only the motions of the Visible Universe, and the greater and outward events and destinies of nations and individuals, but that the Father of Gods and Men, and peculiar Deities under him, influenced, inspired, and sustained, gave and took away the powers of wisdom, virtue, and genius, in every kind of design and in every kind of action.

They would call down the help, suggestion, and inspiration of heavenly guides, protectors, and monitors ;—of Jupiter, to whom even their dim faith looked above themselves and beyond this apparent world, for the incomprehensible causes of things ;-of Apollo, the God of Music and of Song of those divine Sisters, under whose especial charge that imaginative religion placed Poets and their works, the nine melodious Daughters of Memory ;of those three other gentle deities, of whom Pindar affirms, that if there be amongst men anything fair and admirable, to their gift it is owing, and whose name expresses the accomplishing excellence of Poesy, if all suffrages are to be united in praise : bright Sisters too, adored with altar and temple,—the Graces.

VOL. LXXII.-NO. CCCCXLII.

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