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I. God Immanent in Men's Material Interests.

That the Almighty makes his presence felt in the material affairs of his children as well as in their spiritual interests is taught in the Bible, and strongly advocated by many Christians. The process by which God reveals himself may not be clear and definite to all alike. Some are not able to describe with any degree of satisfaction to themselves the methods by which Providence works with them and for them, but that God condescends to enter their affairs, to bless and to protect, to lead and to guide in the field and in the mart, at the desk in the counting room, before the class in the university, in the editorial chair or at the head of the army, in fact, in all avocations of life when men accept the responsibilities and gifts thrust upon them as coming. from the Lord, they believe with all their hearts. Such men realize that highest duty may be performed only as they honor truth and righteousness in all relations. To live honorably and beautifully is their highest desire. They labor not for self

No. I.

but for humanity and God. The number of such people is not small. They stand up in majestic grandeur, towering above their fellows as the tall oak above the shrubbery at its feet. Such characters are the monuments of true religion, and the inspiration of the race.

In the hundred and eighteenth psalm the philosopher and the poet, the historian and the prophet unite in ascribing honor and praise to Almighty God because of that power by means of which He does become a part of the material as well as the spiritual interests of his people. As the opening and the closing words. of the poem are identical with words used in the song sung at the laying of the foundations of the temple (Ezra 3: 10), it is believed that reference is made to that happy and auspicious event, while some insist that this is the very psalm that was used. To the Hebrew the temple represented Jehovah dwelling among them, blessing them in all their interests, material as well as spiritual. The twenty-fifth verse is claimed to be a direct appeal to God for special favor upon a great enterprise,

either personal or national. Some authors go so far as to designate the particular undertaking on which the favor was sought-the rebuilding of the temple. While the business of the Temple was purely religious, it was nevertheless a factor in state affairs. The work of putting up the great building was secular, asking a blessing on the labors of their hands was religious. Others think that the author used the twenty-fifth verse as an invocation for divine favor to rest upon him as king. Others yet claim that in these sweet verses they see the prophetic eye sweeping down the centuries and beholding yonder the kingdom of of Christ established among men, and that in these earnest words is a prayer for the success of that kingdom. Whichever view we take, the impression remains that God is immanent in affairs. But coupled with that idea is another idea, and that is, that godly people are in the world, not for selfish interests, but for the purpose of revealing God, his love and law. In all their doings they are his representatives, his messengers, his witnesses. The touching sentiments of this beautiful psalm are big with precious thoughts. To get from the world its purest and best men must accept the world as a gift from God, to whom they are responsible for its use or abuse. To render to the world highest and sublimest, service men must be to it a redeemer, a God.

human

Life in its highest possibility is unselfish love. The Hon. John Burroughs says: "Love sharpens the eye,

the ear, the touch; it quickens the feet, it steadies the hand, it arms against the wet and the cold. What we love to do, that we do well. Το know is not all; it is only half. Nothing can take the place of love. Love is the measure of life: only so far as we love do we really live." The beasts exists; he does not live. The man with the love of God a passion of his heart alone lives. Divine blessings refer to needs of body and soul, of time and of eternity. While a system of religious doctrines may appeal to the intellect, may be theoretical in statement, religion appeals to the soul and is experimental. Religion is vastly more than a statement of truth accepted by the mind; religion is a power making itself felt in thoughts and deeds. The believer is greatly helped by the knowledge that such and such doctrine is in the Bible, but that doctrine results in highest good only as the man experiences the power of its truth in his own heart and life. Rationalism may give such struction to the words of truth as to challenge the intellect to accept, but when that truth is the experience of the soul that soul is impervious to all materialistic arguments; the truth of God dwell within a factor sweetening, strengthening. beautifying human actions, whether those actions be of a secular or of a religious character. The devout seeks the leading and the blessing of God in all things. Accepting Jesus as Savior and friend is accepting his teachings as the law of conduct. If man is to reign with Christ in glory, Christ is to reign with man in the

world. Whether in business or out of it the true Christian is one with Christ. Religion to such a man is the omnipresent factor, embracing his labors on the farm or in the shop as well as his worship in the sanctuary. The true Christian seeks to get that he may give, to obtain that he may scatter abroad. He is

in the world in Christ's stead, to labor, to suffer, to die if need be, for the glory of the unsearchable riches and wisdom and power of his Redeemer. To live with Christ, in Christ and for Christ is the highest aim of the true convert and the note of greatest intensity in his prayer. (Copyrighted).

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WELSH EDUCATION.

By T. Levi, B. C. L.

The University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, although the oldest of the three constituent colleges of the University of Wales, has been in existence for only about thirty years. So great has been its success as a national institution for imparting a university training, so far beyond the hopes of its founders, that it is difficult to realise how recently it was established at Aberystwyth. The history of this college is characterised by a fearless advance from the beginning. Many of the difficulties which had to be met had also to be encountered by the sister university colleges in South Wales and North Wales; but the Aberystwyth College had for some years to contend alone against the prejudice and timidity which had delayed so long any plan for a national university education. As in the case with the colleges at Cardiff and Bangor, the trials of the period of foundation are almost forgotten in the enthusiastic support of the present. This reference to the unbroken success of

the college should not be allowed to obscure facts. The Aberystwyth College, because it has never abandoned any project undertaken by it, begins the new century with a remarkable extension of its sphere of work, and with a special degree of responsibility.

The University College, Aberystwyth, as an educational centre possesses some curious natural advantages. The chief of these is the advantage derived from the splendid climate of Aberystwyth. The fresh breezes from the sea are most invigorating, particularly during the winter, when the work of the session is in full swing. The walks along the cliffs to the north-west is the most refreshing exercise any hard reader could desire. The hall of residence for women students is situated at the extreme northern end of the most compact promenade in the country: the university college buildings tower high above all other edifices at the southern end. The newly-adapted hall of residence for

either personal or national. Some authors go so far as to designate the particular undertaking on which the favor was sought-the rebuilding of the temple. While the business of the Temple was purely religious, it was nevertheless a factor in state affairs. The work of putting up the great building was secular, asking a blessing on the labors of their hands was religious. Others think that the author used the twenty-fifth verse as an invocation for divine favor to rest upon him as king. Others yet claim that in these sweet verses they see the prophetic eye sweeping down the centuries and beholding yonder the kingdom of Christ established among men, and that in these earnest words is a prayer for the success of that kingdom. Whichever view we take, the impression remains that God is immanent in human affairs. But coupled with that idea is another idea, and that is, that godly people are in the world, not for selfish interests, but for the purpose of revealing God, his love and law. In all their doings they are his representatives, his messengers, his witnesses. The touching sentiments of this beautiful psalm are big with precious thoughts. To get from the world its purest and best men must accept the world as a gift from God, to whom they are responsible for its use or abuse. To render to the world highest and sublimest service men must be to it a redeemer, a God.

Life in its highest possibility is unselfish love. The Hon. John Burroughs says: "Love sharpens the eye,

Divine

the ear, the touch; it quickens the feet, it steadies the hand, it arms against the wet and the cold. What we love to do, that we do well. To know is not all; it is only half. Nothing can take the place of love. Love is the measure of life: only so far as we love do we really live." The beasts exists; he does not live. The man with the love of God a passion of his heart alone lives. blessings refer to needs of body and soul, of time and of eternity. While a system of religious doctrines may appeal to the intellect, may be theoretical in statement, religion appeals to the soul and is experimental. Religion is vastly more than a statement of truth accepted by the mind; religion is a power making itself felt in thoughts and deeds. The believer is greatly helped by the knowledge that such and such doctrine is in the Bible, but that doctrine results in highest good only as the man experiences the power of its truth in his own heart and life. Rationalism may give such struction to the words of truth as to challenge the intellect to accept, but when that truth is the experience of the soul that soul is impervious to all materialistic arguments; the truth of God dwell within a factor sweetening, strengthening. beautifying human actions, whether those actions be of a secular or of a religious character. The devout seeks the leading and the blessing of God in all things. Accepting Jesus as Savior and friend is accepting his teachings as the law of conduct. If man is to reign with Christ in glory, Christ is to reign with man in the

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