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Common School Instruction in Georgia.

report. It presents the leading facts, in regard to school systems, where any such exist, and in regard to the existing state of things where they do not in all, or nearly all our States; accompanied with numerous remarks on the importance of an improved common school education, in every point of view, personal, social, national and moral. It objects to the moral and social tendency of the manual labor system, considered as a system of general education, to be adopted and fostered by government, as well as to the general application of the Lancasterian plan of instruction; and recommends, notwithstanding some difficulties peculiar to the Southern States, the adoption of a system not unlike the Eastern and Middle States. It assumes, above all, as a leading principle — a sine qua non-that the good of the community requires,' that the rich and the poor should be educated together at common schools.' Nothing contained in the report gives us more pleasure, than this truly wise conclusion of the committee. Such a conclusion, reduced to a common and prevailing sentiment, in the breasts of the rich as well as the poor, and acted upon, would do more towards preserving the liberties and happiness of our country, and rendering stable her so much boasted institutions, than any other measure upon which the acts of wise legislators or christian philanthropists can at present be brought to bear. Would that all heads and hearts could be led to unite on this common ground, and to concur in this single principle !

Among the numerous interesting facts and reasonings of the report, we learn with pain, what we had, indeed, feared before, that only a very small part of the children in Georgia are at school. The committee think they hazard nothing in saying, that the proportion is only about twentyfive thousand in eightythree thousand, of those who are of suitable age. That is to say, less than one third of those of proper age, and only one tenth of the entire white population, are receiving the benefits of instruction.

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But the committee propose a remedy for this state of things. They submit, for the consideration of the Legislature, the basis of an act making provision for dividing the State into school divisions, chiefly by counties; appointing commissioners or superintendents for each division; laying off the divisions into school districts; establishing school houses and supporting schools. The support of the schools is to be partly by taxation and partly by a State fund, as in several Northern States. If this system can be adopted and pursued, with such modifications as time and experience may suggest, it will change the whole aspect of things in Georgia, and render her even a more important pillar than she was before, in the national edifice.

Cincinnati College.

COMMON SCHOOL CONVENTION, At Marietta.

A Convention of the Friends of Common Schools, in Washington County, Ohio, was held at Marietta, on the 7th and 8th of November last, at which an address was delivered by Mr William Slocomb, the chairman, On the Defects of Common Schools'; another by the Rev. Hiram Gear, On the Importance of the Co-operation of Parents with Teachers ;' and another by President Lindsley of Tennessee, 'On the relation of Colleges and Common Schools.'

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Reports were also presented by committees appointed for the purpose, on the following subjects. 1. On the best Method of Teaching the Elements of Reading; 2. On Teaching Grammar; 3. On the expediency of forming a County Association, for promoting the Interests of Common School Education; 4. On the Introduction of Vocal Music into Common Schools; 5. On the Construction of School Houses. These reports were all read and accepted; and, in pursuance of a resolution to that effect, and the spirit of the third report, a constitution for a Washington County School Association,' was formed and adopted. Mr Slocomb is the president of this Association, and Thomas W. Ewart the secretary.

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Two interesting questions were also discussed during the progress of the Convention, the first of which was decided in the negative, and the other postponed indefinitely. They were these, Ought our Common Schools to be supported wholly by Public Funds?' and 'Ought the Legislature now to raise the standard for the Qualification of Teachers?'

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Several interesting and spirited resolutions were also passed, the most important of which, in our view, was the following.

'Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Convention, the introduction of vocal music into our common schools, would be highly conducive to the intellectual advancement, the moral elevation, and the individual and social happiness of the pupils.'

This looks like a business doing Convention, and reflects much credit on our Western brethren. Let these Conventions be continued, and conducted in a proper spirit, and Ohio and the whole WEST will soon reap the appropriate fruits.

CINCINNATI COLLEGE.

We have received a circular, including the requisites for admission, the officers, the course of studies, the discipline, and the internal regulations of Cincinnati College. The course seems to us thorough, and the regulations tolerable. The following are the principles adopted in regard to discipline, in the department properly called the college.

'The students of the College proper will be subject to admonition, rebuke, suspension, or expulsion, according to their offences. Corporal

Festum Convention at Keene, N. H.

is a means of excitement to study, is prohibited in Es of the institution. But in cases of continued and

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sa staloudence of anders, where the student is evidently mockig i de rechacy of the professor, and a crisis occurs where the proBe a pup mas yield; the instructer (unless special directions to adi vnray date been received from the parent) may at his discretion 404) abe ovu as an alternative for dismission - always having due regard we she get oberwever, and circumstances of the pupil.'

SCHOOL APPARATUS, AND SCHOOL LIBRARIES.

At a Convention on common education, lately held in Dedham, in 28.6. Ñx20, a committee was appointed to prepare an address to the peopõe of Norfolk county, one of the members of which committee was the Mom Alexander H. Everett; by whom the address is supposed to have Nova drawn up. In this address the subject of furnishing apparatus and Abraries for the use of schools is made quite prominent, and urged upon the attention of every town or county; reminding them, by the way, of the recent act of the Legislature, by which each district is authorized to raise by tax, thirty dollars the first year, and ten dollars a year afterward, as long as they shall see fit, for such a purpose. They are also reminded - and we are exceedingly glad of it-that school houses, as at present constructed, are in most cases but ill adapted to the display and use of apparatus ; and that their walls are even too low and too contracted for the exhibition of maps. Much is also said in the address on the importance of a better acquaintance and more sympathy of parents with teachers. The former should encourage the visits of the latter to their houses, it is thought, and try to encourage him ; and to elevate, through him, the character of the profession. The sentiments of the address were not by any means new; but they should be repeated in the ears of this busy generation till they are believed and acted upon.

EDUCATION CONVENTION AT KEENE, N. H.

At a late Annual Convention of the Cheshire County Association of Common School Teachers and other friends of education at Keene, N. H. the following important question was fully and ably discussed hope not without good effect.

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Is it expedient that the state should appoint an officer who should have the general superintendence and supervision of common schools?' The association also discussed, at considerable length, the subjects of Seminaries for Teachers,' Study of Agriculture in common schools,' and District School Apparatus and Libraries.' On the last mentioned subject, a committee was appointed to memorialize the State LegislaA committee of one person from each town in the county was

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New Female Seminary for Teachers.

appointed to recommend a suitable list of school books for the county. Seven or eight important resolutions prepared by the board of directors were also passed, enforcing the importance of improving the condition of common schools, on every individual in the county, especially on every member of the association; recommending the appointment of an agent or agents to have a general supervision over the schools of the state; recommending also a seminary for the instruction and improvement of teachers to be established in every county in the state; and lastly, urging more attention in schools to the definition of words. - An Address to the Association, by the Hon. Salma Hall, president of the Convention, is, we understand, to be shortly published.

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THE ALLEVIATING WRITING DESK.

We have just seen a model of a Writing Desk, invented by Mr Seth Luther of this city, which, as we conceive, promises to be one of the most useful and important inventions of the day. It is called the 'Alleviating Writing Desk.' It may be used every where, not only in counting houses, but in families, schools, academies and colleges. We shall give a particular description of it in our next number.

PLYMOUTH TEACHERS' SEMINARY.

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We learn from the Boston Recorder that this new Teachers' Seminary is making' quite a figure' in the granite state;' that it has numbered, during the past year, 200 students; 110 of which were in the male, and 90 in the female department. The seminary, as we suppose is well known, is under the care of Rev S. R. Hall, late of Andover, principal; Mr T. D. P. Stone, assistant principal; and six assistants.

The course of study in the male department, embraces four years; that in the female department, three years.

NEW FEMALE SEMINARY FOR TEACHERS.

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The Uxbridge Female Seminary, under the charge of Miss L. A. Washburn, and a suitable number of competent assistants, is designed as we learn from a printed circular of the institution, to prepare young ladies to become teachers and educators of youth, and to fill other useful stations in life.' The institution will be governed, so we are assured by the trustees, by principles similar to those of Ipswich and Hartford seminaries. A complete course of study embraces two years.

If the institution is to be governed by principles similar to those of Ipswich seminary, every body will, as we trust, approve of them at once, and wish the school success. Of Hartford female seminary, as a place of special preparation for teaching, less we presume" is known in the communit herein the public are ignorant on the subject, we have

Education Convention at Keene, N. H.

punishment as a means of excitement to study, is prohibited in every department of the institution. But in cases of continued and wilful disobedience of orders, where the student is evidently mocking at the authority of the professor, and a crisis occurs where the professor or pupil must yield; the instructer (unless special directions to the contrary have been received from the parent) may at his discretion use the rod as an alternative for dismission - always having due regard to the age, character, and circumstances of the pupil.'

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SCHOOL APPARATUS, AND SCHOOL LIBRARIES.

At a Convention on common education, lately held in Dedham, in this State, a committee was appointed to prepare an address to the people of Norfolk county, one of the members of which committee was the Hon. Alexander H. Everett; by whom the address is supposed to have been drawn up. In this address the subject of furnishing apparatus and libraries for the use of schools is made quite prominent, and urged upon the attention of every town or county; reminding them, by the way, of the recent act of the Legislature, by which each district is authorized to raise by tax, thirty dollars the first year, and ten dollars a year afterward, as long as they shall see fit, for such a purpose. They are also reminded and we are exceedingly glad of it—that school houses, as at present constructed, are in most cases but ill adapted to the display and use of apparatus; and that their walls are even too low and too contracted for the exhibition of maps. Much is also said in the address on the importance of a better acquaintance and more sympathy of parents with teachers. The former should encourage the visits of the latter to their houses, it is thought, and try to encourage him; and to elevate, through him, the character of the profession. The sentiments of the address were not by any means new; but they should be repeated in the ears of this busy generation till they are believed and acted upon.

EDUCATION CONVENTION AT KEENE, N. H.

At a late Annual Convention of the Cheshire County Association of Common School Teachers and other friends of education at Keene, N. H. the following important question was fully and ably discussed — we hope not without good effect.

'Is it expedient that the state should appoint an officer who should have the general superintendence and supervision of common schools?'

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The association also discussed, at considerable length, the subjects of Seminaries for Teachers,' Study of Agriculture in common schools,' and District School Apparatus and Libraries.' On the last mentioned subject, a committee was appointed to memorialize the State LegislaA committee of one person from each town in the county was

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