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the Bureau of War Risk and that part of the Public Health Service dealing with ex-service men, which recommendation was embodied in the Sweet Bill.9

The Civilian Vocational Rehabilitation Act, applying to persons injured in industry, was enacted in 1920.10 3. Operation of the Act

The sums appropriated by Congress are to be allotted to the states in the proportion which their population bears to the population of the United States. Three appropriations are made annually:

(1) For the payment of salaries of teachers, supervisors, and directors of agricultural subjects.

(2) For the payment of salaries of trade, home economics, and industrial teachers.

(3) For the preparation of teachers of trade and industrial subjects, teachers of home economics subjects, and teachers, supervisors, and directors of agricultural subjects.

The first appropriation is allotted to the states in the proportion which their rural population bears to the total population of the United States. The second appropriation is allotted to the states in the proportion which their urban population bears to the total urban population of the United States. The third appropriation is allotted to the states in the proportion which their total population bears to the total population of the United States. Provision is also made, so that the annual minimum allotment to a state from the first and second appropriations shall be $5,000 each, and from the third appropriation $10,000 each, with the further proviso that for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1923, and annually thereafter, the minimum allotment to a state from each appropriation shall be $10,000. The total appropriation to the states for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1918, was about $1,500,000. This increases annually until for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1926, and annually thereafter, the total appropriation will be over $7,000,000. The law further provides that each dollar of federal money must be matched by at least another dollar to be expended under the supervision and control of the state board for the same purpose that the federal money is being expended.

The sums thus made available by the federal government seem very small in comparison with the size of the problem, and experience goes to show that the state and local communities have supplemented these appropriations with amounts far in excess of those appropriated by the federal government. 4. How States May Secure Allotments 4

In order to secure its allotment the state must accept the provisions of the act through legislative authority, and the state board must provide a plan of work for the state which is approved by the federal board. Each of the 48 states at present has a state board for vocational education, which is co-operating with the federal board in the administration of this act. The plan submitted annually to the federal board for approval must show the kinds of schools and classes for

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9 Act Aug. 9, 1921 (42 Stat. 147 [Comp. St. Ann. Supp. 1923, 88 96744-96714m]). 10 Act June 2, 1920 (41 Stat. 735 [Comp. St. Ann. Supp. 1923, 88 893244-893244m]).

which it is proposed the allotment shall be used, the plan of administration and supervision to be followed by the state board, the qualifications of teachers, the courses of instruction, the methods of instruction to be used, and the plans for training supervisors and teachers. 5. Federal Board Duties; Pass upon Plans

It is the duty of the federal board to examine these plans and approve the same, if believed to be feasible and found to be in conformity with the provisions and purposes of the federal act. The federal board must certify on or before the 1st day of January of each year to the Secretary of the Treasury each state which has accepted the provisions of the act and complied therewith, including the amounts which the state is entitled to receive. Once the plan of the state is approved by the federal board the administration of the act in the state is in the hands of the state board for vocational education, with the federal law and the state plan as the plans and specifications to guide the work.

6. Federal Board Duties; Studies and Investigates

It is the duty of the Federal Board for Vocational Education to make or cause to have made studies and investigations and reports with particular reference to their use in aiding the states in the establishment of vocational schools and classes and in giving instruction in agriculture, trades and industries, commerce and commercial pursuits, and home economics. Such studies, investigations, and reports include agriculture and agricultural processes and requirements upon agricultural workers; trades, industries, and apprenticeships, trade and industrial requirements upon industrial workers and classification of industrial processes and pursuits; commerce and commercial pursuits; and requirements upon commercial workers; home management, domestic science, and the study of related facts and principles; and problems of administration of vocational schools and of courses of study and instruction in vocational subiects. 7. Organization

The federal administrative agency designed by the act is the Federal Board for Vocational Education. This board consists of seven members, four ex officio and three appointed by the President. They are the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Commissioner of Education, and three citizens who represent, respectively, the manufacturing, commercial, agricultural, and labor interests of the nation.

The state administrative agency provided in the act is a state board for vocational education designated or created by the legislative authority of the state, and consisting of not less than three members and having all necessary powers to co-operate with the Federal Board for Vocational Education in the administration of the provisions of the vocational education act.

Each state has employed a technical staff to carry out the provisions of the state plan and the Federal Board for Vocational Education employs a staff consisting of (1) an executive staff, comprising a director and four chiefs of service, and (2) a number of agents for each service who are technical experts in their respective fields. The general duties of this staff are: To assist the states, more especially the technical staffs of the states, in carrying out the provisions of the state plan in the most effective way. This responsibility is discharged through working in the closest co-operation with the state officials and almost entirely on request, and includes such matters as interpretation of policy, advice, and suggestion as to the carrying on of the various kinds of vocational education, and suggestions for the improvement of the work. The second general duty of the staff consists in the conducting of research work and making the results of that research available to the states through the publication of bulletins, through individual conferences with state representatives, or through state and regional conferences. This work is also carried on in close.co-operation with the states.

The organization is further graphically presented in Chart 44. The composition of the "regions” therein referred to is as follows:

[blocks in formation]

Region No. I

Region No. II

Region

No. III

Region No. IV

Special Agent

for Civilian Vocational Rehabilitation

Home Economics
Education Serv-

ice

Commercial Education Service

Region No. III

Central 12 States

Region No. IV

Pacific 11 States

Region No. III

Central 12 States

Region No. IV

Pacific 11 States

FEDERAL BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

FEDERAL BOARD FOR VOCATIONAL

EDUCATION

Secretary of Labor, Chairman
Secretary of Commerce
Secretary of Agriculture

Standing Committee
Vice Chairman and three members.

Director

Secretary and
Chief Clerk

Vocational Education

Division

Civilian Vocational Rehabilita

tion Division

Editor and Educa.
tional Consultant

Trade and In-
dustrial Educa-

tion Service

Agricultural Educa

tion Service

Region No. 1
North Atlantic

13 States

Region No. I
North Atlantic

13 States

Special Agent for Re-
tail Selling Education

Region No. II

Southern
12 States

Region No. II

Southern
12 States

Region No. I and II

24 States

Region No. III and IV

24 States

Special Agent

for
Girls and Women
Entire Country

Special Service for
Colored Schools

17 States

Organization Chart 44

[graphic]

8. Publications

(a) Annual Report to Congress of the Federal Board for Vocational Education. Government Printing Office, Price, 25 cents.

(b) Federal Board for Vocational Education, Statement of Policies. Revised Edition, May, 1922. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C.

(c) The Federal Board for Vocational Education. Service Monograph No. 6, issued by Institute for Government Research, 1922. Appleton, N. Y. THORPE DEPT.PRAC.-46

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