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SURVEYORS.

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J. F. Stratton

Austin Pomeroy.

1864 1st. Surv'rs, 1829 to 1842 John Durand

Wm. S. Crowl..

1868 ('aleb A. Canfield. 1842 W. S. Crowl..

1870 Henry A. Hayden. 1844 M. F. Cook.

1874 Anson H. De Lamatre. 1846 Henry F. Bean

1876 John T. Durand..

1852
Percy T. Cook

1878
Austin Pomeroy..
1856 Wm. S. Crowl.

.1880 Henry Bean....

. 1862 The following is a list of the justices of the peace of Jackson county, together with their postoffice address and the year upon which their terms expire:

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THE JACKSON COUNTY BAR.

In the review of the pioneers, brief sketches of the ancient Bar of this county have been given, so that a repetition is unnecessary. The junior members ofthe present society, whose years do not place them among the early settlers, will be referred to in the biographical chapter. Therefore a review of the surviving pioneers of the profession, and their very promising juniors, will form the close of this chapter. The following comprise the present Bar :

Jackson-Austin Blair, James C. Wood, David Johnson, G. T. Gridley, Wm. K. Gibson, Eugene Pringle, John D. Conely, Erastus Peck, Melville McGee. J. W. Bennett, Grove H. Wolcott, Enoch Banker.

Brooklyn-Nathan G. King.

Jackson-Lewis M. Powell, Thomas A. Wilson, John C. Sharp, Jonathan L. Videto, Andrew J. Gould, Frank Hewlett, James Hammil, James A. Parkinson, Mark S. Wolcott, Calvin C. Burt, James Gould, N. B. Hall, Geo. Proudfit, Albert A. Bliss, Wm. Seward Gridley, Richmond Livermore, Wm. H. Potts, Reuben E. Clark, Robert J. Haire, Walter Johnson, Robert D. Knowles, J. T. Hammond, Eli A. Clement.

Grass Lake-James Goss.
Norvell—George H. Fay.

Jackson J. C. Lowell, Chas. B. Wood, V. V. B. Merwin, Joshua Haire, George F. Anderson, Thomas E. Barkworth, Byron S. Ashley, Henry Hanaw, Alfred E. Lucking, Charles X. Blair, George H. Jameson, Verne S. Pease, Ray Hewlet, Melville Stone, John E. Winn, John McDevitt.

Hanover—Charles E. Snow.
Jackson--W. A. Chamberlain, F. Livermore, Sr.

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A review of the various political campaigns in any extended form is impracticable ; first, because such a mass of campaign items as this county alone could furnish would require every page in this large volume ; secondly, because the greater number of readers are content with the quadrennial literature which is drawn from its hiding place to make known to the world that there is political war in the United States; and, thirdly, because there is no earthly use in reverting to a subject which is wanting in every charitable and Christian aspect. Here are given a few items dealing with political organization, pure and simple, with three papers seemingly unconnected with politics, and yet exercising a very great influence. These comprise “Sympathy with the Oppressed,” “The Pulpit and the Press," and the Railroad Conspiracy.”. Such papers are most valuable, and the events which they chronicle had a peculiar effect upon the political parties of the county.

The first election held in the township of Jacksonburgh was in 1831, for one congressional delegate and two members of the Legislative Council. The Van Buren-Harrison campaign of 1836 drew forth all the political energies of the people. Again, in 1840 the same political contestants met in the field and excitement reached its highest point. “Hard cider” and “log cabins” were introduced into the campaign ; poles of liberty, stars and stripes, and a hundred inconceivable nicknacks occupied every prominent eminence. The Whigs of Jackson county worked with amazing zeal, and so gained for General Harrison a vote of 1,504 against 1,121 recorded for Mr. Van Buren.

In 1844 James K. Polk was nominated for the presidency by the Democrats, Henry Clay by the Whigs, and James G. Birney by the Free-Soil party. The electors of the county came forth in their numbers, giving to President Polk a majority of 87 over Henry Clay, who received 1,302 votes. The Abolitionist Birney received 475 votes from men who even then recognized true liberty and a free soil.

In 1848 Zachary Taylor, Lewis Cass and Martin Van Buren were nominated by their respective parties, the first on the Whig ticket, the second on the Democratic, pure and simple, and the third by the Free Democrats. The contest throughout the Union was spirited, and in no place more so than in this county. Gen. Taylor received 969 votes, the old Governor of Michigan Territory 1,547, and Mr. Van Buren 1,072. Jackson county acted wisely and well in giving a great majority for Lewis Cass.

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