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Burns to Mr Thomson, 3d Aug. O this is no my ain Lassie.

Now Spring has clad the Grove in Green.

O Bonnie was yon

Rosy Brier,

e 167

Mr Thomson to Burns, 3d Aug. Admiration of his Songs,

e 170

Inscription for an Altar to Independence,

e 171

Burns's antipathy to the Duke of Queensberry,

171

Verses on the Destruction of the Woods near Drumlanrig,

k 172

Rencontre of Burns with Mr Pattison of Kelvin Grove,

173

Burns’s habits. Perplexing because of the various aspects he

presented. Mr James Gray,

174

Death of Burns's Daughter,

175

Broken Health of Burns in Autumn '95,

176

Visit of Professor Walker to Burns,

176

Letter to Mrs Dunlop, 15th Dec. Gloomy Reflections,

Miss Fontenelle-Address for her Benefit Night,

Rhymed NoteTo Collector Mitchell,

National Distress-The Sedition Bill-Displacing of Harry

Erskine from the Deanship,

181

The Dean of Faculty, a Ballad,

h m 182

Burns irremediably destroys his health,

183

Letter to Mrs Riddel, 20th Jan. 1796. Anacharsis's Travels,

Present of a Kipper to Mr Peter Hill,

184

Letter to Mrs Dunlop, 31st Jan. Affliction,

Rhymed Note-To Colonel De Peyster,

185

Progressive Illness of Burns,

187

Mr Thomson to Burns, 5th Feb. An awful Pause,

e 187

Burns to Mr Thomson, Feb. Hey for a Lass wi' a Tocher,

e 188

Mr Thomson to Burns. Allan's Etchings,

Burns requests a return of lent money from Mr Clarke, the

Schoolmaster,

189

Letter of Mr Clarke,

189

Rencontre of Miss Grace Aiken with Burns,

190

Burns's Salary reduced during his Illness,

191

Burns to Mr Thomson, April. His wretched Health, Allan's

Etchings,

Mr Thomson to Burns, 4th May. Sympathy,

Burns to Mr Thomson. [17th May.] Jessy. Introduces John

Lewars,

e 193

Jessy Lewars. Songs on her,

194

Kirkcudbright Election of Summer '96. Song for it-Troggin, j 195

Progressive Illness of Burns,

198

msicles on Jessie Lewars,

199

airs Riddel, 4th June. Cannot attend a Ball,

e 199
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LIFE AND WORKS

OF

ROBERT BURN S.

DUMFRIES.

DECEMBER 1791 - JULY 1796—(CONTINUED.)

We have seen that, in July 1793, when Burns was asserting his independence of remuneration for his songs, he was in circumstances to render the receipt of a little money highly desirable. It was a time of general difficulty and distress, in consequence of the disturbance which the war created in the usual course of commerce, and the additional burdens which it threw upon the country. Consols, which had been at 96 in the beginning of the preceding year, were down to 78. In the month of July, the number of Scottish bankrupts was forty-three, or about four times the average. Burns suffered among the rest, for an extra income which he derived from the unloading of foreign vessels was now at an end.

TO MR PETER HILL.

[DUMFRIES, July 1793 ?] MY DEAR SIR~* * * * Now that business is over, how are you, and how do you weather this accursed time? God only knows what will be the consequence; but in the meantime the country, at least in our part of it, is still progressive to the devil. For my party "I jouk, and let the jaw flee o'er.'1 As my hopes in this world are but slender, I am turning rapidly devotee, in the prospect of sharing largely in the world to come.

How is old sinful Smellie coming on? Is there any talk of his second volume? If you meet with my much-valued old friend, Colonel Dunbar of the Crochallan Fencibles, remember me most affectionately to him. Alas! not unfrequently, when my heart is in a wandering humour, I live past scenes over again. To my mind's eye, you, Dumbar, Cleghorn, Cunningham, &c. present their friendly phiz[es], and my bosom aches with tender recollections. Adieu!

R. B.

In the latter part of July, the poet had an excursion through Galloway with his friend Mr Syme, who communicated to Dr Currie an animated account of their adventures:

"I got Burns a gray Highland shelty to ride on. We dined the first day, 27th July 1793, at Glendonwyne's of Parton-a beautiful situation on the banks of the Dee. In the evening, we walked out, and ascended a gentle eminence, from which we had as fine a view of Alpine scenery as can well be imagined. A delightful soft evening shewed all its wilder as well as its grander graces. Immediately opposite, and within a mile of us, we saw Airds, a charming romantic place, where dwelt Lowe, the author of Mary weep no more for me. This was classical ground for Burns. He viewed “the highest hill which rises o'er the source of Dee;" and would have stayed till “the passing spirit” had appeared, had we not resolved to reach Kenmure that night. We arrived as Mr and Mrs Gordon’ were sitting down to supper.

* Here is a genuine baron's seat. The castle, an old building, stands on a large natural moat. In front, the river Ken winds for several miles through the most fertile and beautiful holm,4 till it expands into a lake twelve miles long, the banks of which, on the south, present a fine and soft landscape of green knolls, natural wood, and here and there a gray rock. On the north, the aspect is great, wild, and, I may say, tremendous. In short, I can

1 A Scottish proverbial expression, as much as to say, 'I duck, and let the wave pass over me.' 2 A beautiful and well-known ballad, which begins thus

* The moon bad climbed the highest hill

Which rises o'er the source of Dee;
And from the eastern summit shed

Its silver light on tower and tree.' 3 Mr Gordon was representative of the Viscounts Kenmure-a title restored in his person in 1824.

4 The level low ground on the banks of a river or stream. This word should be adopted from the Scottish, as, indeed, ought several others of the same nature, That dialect is singularly copious and exact in the denominations of natural objeets.

CURRIE.

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