Page images
PDF
[ocr errors][merged small]

~ very willing to keep lockediup from others; but whether"-from his ._former notes being intrinsically without merit, or from its being expected that so humble a being as a Translator, should steer at “as great a distance as possible from the higher parts of authorship, the Translator candidly confesses that the reception of these notes, so far as he-has had occasion to learn, was not such as to induce him to -resume the Ioflice of Y Commentator.

From an idea that the weights used in the original, where the contrary was not ex? pressly stated, were French, the Translator uniformly considered inarcs to mean mares

‘ of‘ France ; and it was not till-near the end

[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small]

The Translator in printing a list of Errata I; has no doubt that it might be easily in-\i\ creased by an attentive and intelligent reader. Those who know the difliculty of carrying a work through the press with a * tolerable degree of correctness, will not perhaps be the most forward to accuse him i

[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

0

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Plants supplying raw materials for manufactures and com-
merce.—Rearing of cattle.—Fisheries.—Agricultural pro-
duce estimated from the value of the tithes. ’

ALTHOUGH the Mexican agriculture, like the
agriculture of every country which supplies
the wants of its own population, is principally
directed towards alimentary plants; New
Spain, however, is not less rich in those com-
modities exclusively called Colonial; that is to
say, in the productions which supply raw ma-
terials for the commerce and manufacturing in-
dustry of Europe. That vast kingdom unites,
in this point of view, the advantages of New
England with those of the West India Islands.
It is beginning in a particular manner to
enter into competition with these islands, now
that the civil war of St. Domingo, and the
devastation of the French sugar colonies have
rendered the cultivation of colonial commodi-
ties more profitable on the continent of Ame-"

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic][merged small]

rica. It is even observable that in Mexico
this species of cultivation has made a much
more considerable progress than that of corn.
In these climates, the same extent of ground,
for example, an acre of 5568 square metres *,

yields to the cultivator from 80 to

[ocr errors]

1n sugar.1' The difference‘ in the value of the
produce being then so enormous, we ought by
no means to wonder that the Mexican colo-
nist gives to colonial commodities a preference
over barley and wheat. But this predilection
will never disturb the equilibrium which has
hitherto existed between the different branches
of agriculture, because, fortunately, a great
part of New Spain, situated under a climate
more cold than temperate, is unfit for the
production of sugar, cofl"ee, cocoa, indigo, and
cotton. J

The cultivation of the sugar-cane has made
such rapid progress within these last years,
that the exportation of sugar at the port of
Vera Cruz actually amounts to more than

* 57,780 square feet. Trans,
T This estimate is looked upon as the most exact by the
colonists of Louisiana near New Orleans. They calculate

“‘*"on 20 bushelsof wheat, 250 pounds of cotton, and 1000

[ocr errors]

pounds of sugar per acre. This is the mean produce; but
it may be easily conceived that these results must be modified
by a number of local circumstances.

I

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »