Page images
PDF
EPUB

by the earth. An odorless apparatus has been in use in an adjoining town for the past year, and has been used in our village for emptying cesspools with very good results.

There are two large cemeteries in our township, Hillside and Catholic, and a small cemetery where a few families bury.

Our secretary, who is township assessor, keeps a record of vital statistics.

During the prevalence of diphtheria the laws of 1883, relating to public funerals of those who die with contagious diseases, were published in our weekly paper so that all might be informed of their existence.

HANOVER TOWNSHIP. - Report from G. A. BECKER, M.D.

There have been a few mild cases of scarlatina, with one fatal case, during this year. Malarial diseases have been on an increase, due, probably, to the wet season followed by the drouth. The southern portion of the township is low meadow land, and after heavy rains or protracted wet spells is nearly all under water, and then, when a hot, dry spell succeeds the wet spell, there is a great deal of decomposing vegetable matter.

PEQUANNOCK TOWNSHIP. - Report from E. W. MARTIN, Sec'y.

There has been no contagious disease among us. The subject of vaccination has been attended to.

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. - Report from E. C. WILLET, Secy.

The supply of water in this township is mostly springs, and the drainage of the township as a general thing is natural.

We have but one slaughter-house in the township. There has been no complaint against it. It is kept in better condition than formerly.

Our school-houses through the township are in good order and well ventilated.

There has been no prevailing epidemic this year. Malaria we have had to some extent; some few cases of dysentery; pneumonia, but few cases.

MORRISTOWN. - - Report from Chas. H. GREEN, Clerk.

Our water-supply is from springs; furnished by the Morris Aqueduct Company. Streets are kept very clean and in good order; the principal streets are macadamized. Cesspool system. No sewers.

Refuse is deposited on public dumping ground, buried in trenches.

Two burying grounds in city, but seldom used; two cemeteries out of city limits.

Quarantine when necessary, and contagious diseases looked after by health physician. Expenses about eight hundred dollars.

OCEAN COUNTY.

LACEY TOWNSHIP. - Report from FRANKLIN MATHEWS, Sec'y.

Well-water is used. Cellars wet, contain water often. No malaria. Two school-houses, in good condition. Vaccination not well kept up. Pneumonia and typhoid fever.

PASSAIC COUNTY MANCHESTER TOWNSHIP. Report from John H. VAN HOUTEN.

No sewers in the township. Cesspools, where used, are generally with open bottoms and sides, and are emptied by having contents taken out by buckets. If slops and water, these leach through the ground, and then, what remains, is shoveled out and taken to the manure or compost heap.

CITY OF PASSAIC. - - Report from F. H. RICE, M.D.

The health of the city has been unusually good for the past year. No epidemic or prevalent disease has invaded the city. Malaria decreases year by year. The old arrangements for the water-closets still prevail, but are growing less popular. The water-supply comes from the Passaic river, but for drinking purposes cisterns and driven wells are mostly used. The Board have called the attention of the city council to the necessity of having a system of sewerage at once. They have taken initiatory steps to secure the same. So, by another year, we hope to have the city sewered, or some part of it at least.

PATERSON. - - Report from WILLIAM K. NEWTON, M. D.

In our report for the year ending October 1st, 1883, we outlined the facts relating to items A, B, C, D, H, K, R, S, T and U in the schedule.

Under water-supply we would add to last year's report by stating that we have availed ourselves of the provisions of the supplementary health law of 1884, and have passed an ordinance relating to the water-supply. Each well in the city is being examined, and the water thereof analyzed by the health officer. Eleven public and three private wells have been ordered closed or unused.

One mile of new sewers has been completed this year. Under authority given by the Board of Aldermen, we have ordered three hundred and forty-eight houses connected with the public sewers, where such connections did not exist.

A form for the sanitary survey of a house has been prepared, and we shall be able to report in a year after the statistics shall have been tabulated.

We have made but little headway in methods of disposing of housewaste. Two odorless companies now do all the work of removing night soil, all other methods being prohibited.

A thorough inspection of our schools is to be made this winter.

The system outlined in our last report has been followed out to our satisfaction. During the year embraced in this report five hundred and forty-seven nuisances have been abated. Prosecutions before the recorder have been rare, and penalties not to exceed forty dollars in all have been imposed.

The clerk of the board of aldermen is, by virtue of his office, register of vital statistics, and not being a physician, and taking no interest in the subjects, vital facts of great value are not used. The board of aldermen has been petitioned to assign this work to this Board, but for political reasons have so far refused to act. In the meantime figures of extreme value to us in the study of the sanitary condition of the city go for naught. We hope for a change in the future.

The plan noted in the report for 1883 has been followed out with partial success. The following cases of contagious diseases have been under our care:

Cases.

9...

oso er

..............

8.............

.............

DIPHTHERIA.

Deaths.
1883. October.........
November.........

............ 12......
December ..

15............. 1884. January.. ..............

.............. 24............. February...

............ March..

11.............
April.............

............
May.......
June ..... .....................
July.........
August........................................... 2................
September ...................

...........

3............. Total ..........

98....... Percentage of deaths to cases, 29.59 per cent.

............ ...........

III III Co 19

.

.

.

.

.........

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

1883. October...........

November..............

December ...........
1884. January................. •

February..............
March...
April..........................
May.............
June .....

[blocks in formation]

I NOI CON CO CT A V

July ......

...........
..............

August ................
September............

40....................
26.............
18............

................

Total ................. ..............478 ..............
Percentage of deaths to cases, 10.04 per cent.

No cases of small-pox are noted. It is conceded that the reports of cases of diphtheria and scarlet fever are pretty full, very few cases escaping notice.

The city government appropriated three thousand six hundred dollars for the uses of this Board for the fiscal year ending March 20th, 1885.

WAYNE TOWNSHIP. - Report from RICHARD J. BANTA, Sec'y.

The drainage of lands in the western part of the township is needed very badly, and the people begin to see the advantage they would derive from it. Some have already commenced, and I think others will follow.

SALEM COUNTY.

LOWER ALLOWAYS CREEK. Report from W. WINFIELD PATRICK.

Dysentery and malarial diseases have been prevalent, also measles and mumps.

The losses of animals have been small, and have had no contagious diseases.

LOWER PENNS NECK. - - Report from SAMUEL LECROY,

No disease of animals except a few cattle that have died in the meadows a few weeks ago.

We have had this year typhoid fever, some malaria, fever and ague.

QUINTON TOWNSHIP. - - - Report from G. A. AYARS.

Public health laws and regulations receive careful attention from Dr. A. G. McPherson, member of local Board of Health.

Sanitary expenses, total up to date, $16.
No special diseases, but all slightly tinctured with malaria.

CITY OF SALEM. - - Report from WILLIAM T. HILLIARD.

In presenting this our second annual report, we feel there is cause for congratulation that the health of our city has been generally good; no epidemic or contagious disease having prevailed to any considerable extent during the year.

As stated in our last report the public water-supply is from Laurel run. The works are owned and conducted by the city, the water being conveyed through cast-iron pipes a distance of three and a half or four miles. The quality of the water continues to be unsatisfactory, so that it is used for drinking and culinary purposes only to a very limited extent, except in winter. The water of the run when it enters the pond is pure and the quality good, but the bottom of the pond being swamp, mud or turf, causes a considerable discoloration of the water, and imparts to it a disagreeable taste. It has been introduced into about two hundred and five premises. The water of our wells, as previously mentioned, is quite hard, with a slightly unpleasant taste to those unaccustomed to it, but is believed to be entirely

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »