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The great mistake made was in trying to accomplish too much with too little, and the Committee remarked : “ There is no doubt but that these einbarrassments have arisen from the continued negligence of the Council to appoint a qualified book-keeper, and that they are not chargeable upon any individual member of the Council or other officer connected with the University.”

The Legislature by an act passed April 17, 1838, appropriated $6,000 a year for five years, and until otherwise directed. Whatever else was received came from the private munificence of the citizens of New York, with the single exception of the Hon. Stephen Van Rensselaer, of Albany.'

The burden of debt brought its natural consequences in the dissatisfaction of professors at salaries reduced or delayed, leading to numerons resignations and to much feeling on the part of these professors and their friends. The Rev. Dr. James M. Mathews, the first Chancellor, resigned his place early in February, 1838, as appears by the minutes in consequence of impaired health. The Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, of New Jersey, was unanimously elected in his place, and was installed on the 5th of June following.

In May, 1838, the debt of the University, including interest, was about $172,383.48, of which the sum of $110,000 was secured by bonds and mortgages, and $62,383.48 was a floating debt, for which early provision must be made. To accomplish this a subscription was circulated, with the condition that it should not be valid unless the sum of $75,000 was raised. Before the Regents' committee had reported (December 31, 1839), the sum of $77,050 had been subscribed, of which $43,000 was from those who were among the original founders of the University. In view of recent events, the committee of the Regents stated that entire harmony seemed to exist between the different members of the institution, and that the influence of past dissensions appeared to have passed away.

From this period the history of the University was not disturbed by any event that came to public notice, and when ten years afterward resolutions were introduced in the Assembly directing investigations to be made into the condition of the University, the committee reported that no charges had been preferred against any of its officers or professors, and that they found nothing to be done.'

Although it would appear that exalted expectations had been

Brief History of the Origin and Progress of the University of the City of New York. Assem. Doc. 3, 1840.

Assem. Doc. 169, 1849.

raised in the beginning, with respect to an immensely varied and comprehensive course of instruction, the system when fully organized did not differ materially from the usual course as taught in other Colleges, with the addition of departments of Law and of Medicine, and a Grammar School, as we shall separately notice. It, however, afforded a wider opportunity for selection in portions of the course than was then common in other Colleges.

In 1871, the Faculty of Science and Letters was more distinctly divided into a Faculty of Arts, and a Faculty of Science, and parallel full courses of instruction have since been given. The former included the ancient languages, and the latter the subjects taught in the best scientific schools, with Civil Engineering and Analytical Chemistry, for which special facilities have been afforded. In this department French and German take the place of Greek and Latin.

Two Literary Societies have been sustained for many years, with good working libraries and regular weekly sessions and exercises in debate, elocution and literary efforts of various kinds.

In recent years the institution has received large gifts from liberal friends, among whom of those now deceased may be mentioned George Griswold, John Johnston, John C. Green, Julius Hallgarten, Augustus Schell and Loring Andrews; and among the living, the name of John Taylor Johnston is most conspicuous.

Upon the entrance of the Rev. Howard Crosby, as Chancellor of the University in 1870, the courses in Arts and Sciences (formerly $80 per annum) were made gratuitous, and no tuition bills have since been required. This does not include the Medical and the Law departments.

Students upon matriculating have the option of entering the de. partment of Arts, or that of Science; or if they do not aspire to an Academic Degree, they may take a selected course. An incidental charge of $15 per annum is made for lighting and warming rooms and other general expenses. In chemical analysis a similar sum is required to pay cost of material used.

Fellowships.— There are three Fellowships, yielding $300, $200 and $100 respectively. They may be enjoyed for one year after graduation by students who are deemed worthy, and upon condition of examinations during the Fellowship year.

Collections. — These have been greatly increased within a recent period. In Geology, they contain about 10,000 specimens; in Chemistry they are ample and increasing, and in Physics they are extensive and continually receiving additions.

The Library of the University is still small. Its apparatus is adequate to present necessities, and has been increased from time to time as required.

Modification of the Charter in 1883. Upon the application of the Council, in which the stockholders acquiesced, the charter was aniended by the Legislature in 1883, as follows:

1. The provision making the Mayor and four members of the Common Council members of the corporation was repealed.

2. The provision that no religious sect should ever have a majority in the Council was repealed.

3. Hereafter all corporate rights are to be vested in the Council thereof, which Council itself shall be the corporation.

4. The Council shall have power to fill its own vacancies, and at each annual election one fourth of the members then to be elected shall be elected by the Council.

5. All provisions of the act incorporating the University inconsistent with the foregoing amendments were repealed.

6. The Regents may, for cause satisfactory to them, alter, amend or repeal the ordinances making these amendments.

Civil Engineering.— This has been taught from the beginning, but began to appear as a distinct branch about thirty years ago. It now covers three years, parallel with the Sophomore, Junior and Senior years of the Department of Science. The studies in English, Elementary Mathematics and Natural Science are pursned with the classes of that department. The fee for this branch is $50 a year, in addition to the $15 for general incidental expenses. Upon graduation the degree of Civil Engineer is conferred.

Department of Civil Engineering in the University of the City

of New York.

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In years in which the number of students is not given, they were included in the numbers reported in the Department of Science.

Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry. - This was established under the late Professor Jolin W. Draper, whose eminent attainments and original researches gave prominence to this branch of the Scientific Course through many years. It has been recently refitted, and its appointments are according to the very best models. The required course of students in the Department of Science covers Qualitative Analysis and the Blow-pipe. Students desiring instruction in Quantitative Analysis, Assaying, Gas and Organic Analysis are amply provided for. The fee for advanced instruction is $50 per annum. From 1859 to 1871 this branch was separately reported to the Regents as follows:

Class of Practical and Analytical Chemistry in the University

of the City of New York, from 1859 to 1871, inclusive.

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Statistics of Attendance and Graduation in the Departments of

Arts and Science in the University of the City of New York.

UNDERGRADUATES.

GRADUATES. *

YEARS
ENDING

IN

153 122 56 81 122 135

151

27 51 32 30 34 33 37 39 33 &2 22 13 21

143 131 135 146 151

135

18 22 34 46 29 34 34 31 41 40 28 25 17 11 18 16 20 22 21 25 21 24 24 21 22

18

1837. 1838. 18397 1840.. 1841. 1842.. 1843. 1844. 1845. 1846. 1847. 1848. 1849. 1850. 1851. 1852. 1853. 1854. 1855. 1856. 1857 1858. 1859. 1860. 1861. 1862. 1863. 1864. 1865. 1866. 1867. 1868. 1869. 1870.. 1871... 1872. 1873. 1874. 1875. 1876. 1877 1878. 1879. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884.

14 14 15 23

2
1

15 12 27 15 15 23 31 40 21 32 80 30 82 31 22 21 11 12 12 12 14 12 13 17 11 19 20 11

9 15 6 7

18 33 43 35 36 38 30 42 45 30 31 22 14 20 17 18 26 31 28 28 35 38 25 23 29 26 29 15 18 20 34 27 28 86 83 44 46 27 29

115 89 75 65 63 66 96 109 106 103 100 104

28 18 16 26 34 44 26 34 84 32 31 34 29 23 16 16 16 18 17 20 19 20 17 28 26 24 17 20 17 12 16 17 26 33 15 12 21 20 26 31 21 18 29

10 18 13 15 12 12 13 14

1 3 3 2 2

12 16 32 89 37 31 32 25 26 48 13 24 15 14 19 25 26 33 28 45

103

1 1

26

3 4

9

8 7 8 10 14 13 15 13 11 8 6

115 102 93 83 60 63 76 91 128 104 121 122 139 143 128 138

19 14 14 15 14 42 15 25 27 22 83 42 26 24 29 26

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50

18

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52 40 38 52 37 34 31

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11 5 4 6 10 16 17 10 1 7 6 11

9 10 2 3

32

114

10 10 10 11 15 8 6

1

29
40

110
126

30
40

17
21

24
15

24
14

95
90

* In 1833 there were 3 graduates; in 1834, 9; in 1835, 14, and in 1836, 26.
+ Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior, 28, in about equal numbers.

| Although the column of "A. M.” is partly blank, it is not to be inferred that this degree was not granted in the early years. The numbers are given as reported to the Regents.

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