Page images
PDF
EPUB

5.52

5.521

looking along the fore and aft axis of the unit; and dihedral angle A (aft) is formed by the intersection of two vertical planes making dihedral angles of 90° to the left and 90° to the right, respectively, when facing aft of a vertical plane passing through the fore and aft axis of the light unit. Each dihedral angle shall be understood to include the bounding planes as well as the space between the planes.

Classification. Position lights shall be separated into three categories according to their use and candlepower distribution.

Forward Position Lights. Each forward position light shall have an intensity of not less than 3 candles in all directions in dihedral angle L for the left light and in dihedral angle R for the right light. Within these dihedral angles, respectively, the intensity in all directions shall equal or exceed the minimum values given in Table I according to the angle between the direction of measurement and forward axis of the unit.

TABLE I
Minimum Permissible Intensities in Any Plane Through the

Forward Axis of the Unit
At angles from forward
axis not exceeding

Intensity
60 degrees

5 candles 30 degrees

10 candles 20 degrees

20 candles 15 degrees

30 candles 10 degrees

35 candles 5 degrees

40 candles Within the same dihedral angles the intensities in the horizontal plane shall equal or exceed the minimum values given in Table II according to the angle between the direction of measurement and the forward axis of the unit.

TABLE II
Minimum Permissible Intensities in the Horizontal Plane

Through the Forward Axis of the Unit
At angles from forward
axis not exceeding

Intensity
80 degrees

5 candles 40 degrees

10 candles 30 degrees

20 candles 20 degrees

30 candles 10 degrees

40 candles In all directions in dihedral angle R for the left light and in dihedral angle L for the right light, a tolerance of 10° will be allowed in which the intensity of these lights shall be reduced to not over 10 candles. In these same directions a further tolerance of an additional 10° will be allowed in which the intensity of these lights shall be reduced to not over 10 candles. In all directions in dihedral angle A a tolerance of 10° will be allowed in which the intensity shall be reduced

5.522

5.523 -NUA

to not more than 1 candle. In all directions outside the specified dihedral angle and the allowed tolerance angles for each unit, the stray light intensity shall not exceed 1 candle.

Rear Position Lights. Rear position lights shall emit an alternate aviation red and aviation white flash repeated at a frequency of 40 cycles a minute. Each cycle shall have the following characteristics: 150° white-10° dark-150° red50° dark. The flasher shall be tested for the voltage range for which it is designed. The variation in frequency and the variation of the component parts of each cycle shall not exceed 10 percent throughout the voltage range for which the flasher was designed. Both white and red lights shall be fitted with 32 candlepower lamps. The red and white units of the light may be separate units spaced as closely as possible.

Each color of light shall be completely visible in dihedral angle A. Each rear position light shall have an intensity of not less than 4 candles in dihedral angle A. · Within this dihedral angle the intensity in all directions not exceeding 70° from the rear axis of the unit, shall be not less than 8 candles. Beyond the limits of dihedral angle A, a tolerance of 10° in all directions in dihedral angle L and in dihedral angle R will be allowed in which the intensity of this light must be reduced to a maximum stray light intensity of 1 candle. In all directions outside the specified dihedral angle and the allowed tolerance angles, the stray light intensity shall not exceed 1 candle.

Alternate Non-Transport Category Rear Position Lights. These lights shall emit a continuous white light in all directions in dihedral angle A as specified in Section 5.522.

Color. All left forward position lights shall be aviation red, all right forward position lights shall be aviation green, and all rear position lights for non-air carrier aircraft shall be aviation white. These colors are defined as follows:

(a) Aviation red is a color having the following International Commission on Illumination (ICI) chromaticity coordinates:

y is not greater than 0.355, and

z is not greater than 0.002
(b) Aviation green is a color having the following ICI
chromaticity coordinates:

x is not greater than 0.440-0.320 y
x is not greater than y-0.170 and

y is not less than 0. 390–0.170 x
(c) Aviation white is a color having the following ICI
chromaticity coordinates:

x is not less than 0.350 x is not greater than 0.540 y-y, is not numerically greater than 0.01 y, being the y coordinate of the Planckian radiator for

which x=x.

5.53

5.6

LANDING LIGHTS

5.61

5.611

Landing lights if required for night operation shall meet the following requirements.

Classification. Landing lights shall be separated into three classes with regard to their candlepower.

Class I (Spot). The candlepower shall not be less than 350,000 candles in all directions within 1.5o of the axis of the beam, except that, in the horizontal plane through the axis the candlepower shall not be less than 350,000 candles throughout a sector within 2o measured to the left and right of the axis of the beam.

Class 2 (Flood). The candlepower shall not be less than 200,000 candles within 4° of the axis of the beam on a horizontal plane through that axis.

Class 3 (Spot). The candlepower shall not be less than 150,000 candles in all directions within 1° of the axis of the beam, except that, in the horizontal plane through the axis the candlepower shall not be less than 150,000 throughout a sector within 1.5o measured to the left and right of the axis of the beam.

Color. All landing lights shall be aviation white.

5.612

5.613

5.62

5.7

PARACHUTE FLARES

5.71

5.711

5.712

5.713

Parachute flares required for night operation shall meet the following requirements.

Classification. Parachute flares shall be separated into three classes with regard to intensity, burning time and rate of descent.

Class 1. Class 1 flares shall have a light duration of at least 3 minutes, a light intensity of at least 200,000 candles and a rate of descent not greater than 550 feet per minute (167.6 m/min.).

Class 2. Class 2 flares shall have a light duration of at least 1 minutes, a light intensity of at least 110,000 candles and a rate of descent not greater than 550 feet per minute (167.6 m/min.).

Class 3. Class 3 flares shall have a light duration of at least 1 minute, a light intensity of at least 70,000 candles and a rate of descent not greater than 550 feet per minute (167.6 m/min.).

SAFETY BELTS
Safety belts shall be capable of passing the following tests.
Berth and Waist Type Belts

Static Test. A safety belt for one person shall be capable of withstanding a static load of 1,000 pounds (454 kg.) and for two persons a static load of 2,000 pounds (907 kg.) applied to the fastened belt midway between the points of attachment, simulating the manner in which a person's weight would be applied in a crash. The quick release

5.8

5.81 5.811

5.812

mechanism shall be capable of withstanding these loads without undue distortion so that when, in the case of a belt designed for one person, the load is relieved to 250 pounds (113 kg.), and in the case of a belt designed for two persons, the load is relieved to 500 pounds (227 kg.), the release mechanism can be operated by hand with a simple operation. The force necessary to open the buckle shall not exceed 45 pounds (20.4 kg.) in the case of either the single or double belt.

Impact Test. A safety belt for one person shall be capable of withstanding an impact load of 312 foot pounds (43 kgm.), and for two persons an impact load of 625 foot pounds (86 kgm.), as represented by dropping freely 250 and 500 pound (113 and 227 kg.) weights respectively 15 inches (38 cm.) onto the belt, simulating the manner in which a person's weight would be applied in a crash. The height of the drop shall be measured before the impact test by allowing the weight to rest on the belt and then raising the weight 15 inches (38 cm.). The quick release mechanism shall be capable of withstanding this impact without undue distortion and shall be of such design that it can be operated by hand with a simple operation while such weights respectively are still suspended in the belt after the impact test. The force necessary to open the buckle shall not exceed 45 pounds (20.4 kg.) in the case of either the single or double belt. The safety belt must, in the case of belts designed for one person, arrest the motion of the falling weight within a distance of 4 inches (10 cm.), and in the case of belts designed for two persons, within a distance of 6 inches (15 cm.), measured vertically from the point 15 inches (38 cm.) below the starting point of the weight. Waist-Shoulder

Safety Belts Static Tests. The method of testing shall be in accordance with that prescribed in Section 5.811 except that the shoulder straps shall be in place in the release mechanism. With the 1,000 (454 kg.) pound load in the waist portion of the belt relieved to 250 pounds (113 kg.), a load of 250 pounds (113 kg.) shall be applied to each shoulder strap to simulate a forward and upward load at a 45° angle due to nose-over. The load in each shoulder strap shall then be relieved to 60 pounds (27 kg.) and with the waist portion of the belt assembly still loaded to 250 pounds (113 kg.), the quick release mechanism shall be capable of withstanding these loads without undue distortion so that it can be operated by one hand with a simple operation. The force necessary to open the buckle shall not exceed 45 pounds (20 kg.).

Impact Test. The method of testing shall be in accordance with that prescribed in Section 3.812 except that the shoulder straps shall be in place merely to complete the release mechanism.

5.82 5.821

5.822

ANNEX H

AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION AND IDENTIFICATION MARKS

DEFINITIONS

(a) Aircraft Aircraft shall comprise all apparatus or contrivances which can derive support in the atmosphere from reactions of the air.

(b) Aerostat. Aerostat shall mean an aircraft supported in the air statically.

(c) Balloon. Balloon shall mean an aerostat (free or captive) non-mechanically-driven.

(d) Airship. Airship, shall mean a mechanically-driven aerostat with means of directional control.

(e) Aerodyne. Aerodyne shall mean an aircraft whose support in flight is derived dynamically from the reaction on surfaces in motion relative to the air.

(f) Aeroplane (Airplane). Aeroplane (airplane) shall mean a mechanically-driven aerodyne supported in flight by aerodynamic reactions on surfaces remaining fixed under the same conditions of flight.

(g) Glider. Glider shall mean a non-mechanically-driven aerodyne supported in flight by aerodynamic reactions on surfaces remaining fixed under the same conditions of flight.

(h) Helicopter. Helicopter shall mean an aerodyne supported in flight by aerodynamic reactions on rotating surfaces which are mechanically-driven.

(i) Gyroplane. Gyroplane shall mean a mechanically-driven aerodyne supported in flight by aerodynamic reactions on rotating surfaces which derive their rotary force from reactions of the air.

(1) Ornithopter. Ornithopter shall mean an aerodyne supported in flight by aerodynamic reactions on flapping surfaces which are mechanically-driven.

253

[blocks in formation]
« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »