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Beaver Seminary and Institute.
Plairsville Ladies' Institute ...
Columbus M. and F. Academy..
Conestoga Collegiate Institute.
Cumberland Valley Institute ..
Dayton Academy....
Eldersridge Academy ..
English and Classical Institute.
Freeburg Academy........
Greenwood Seminary.....
Kishacoquillas Seminary.
Missionary Institute....
Moravian Seminary for Ladies.
Mount Dempsey Academy....
Nazareth Hall...
Oak Dale Seminary...
Parkesburg Institute..
Reading Classical Academy..
Southwestern Normal School
Witherspoon Institute.....
Wyers' Boarding School...
Wyoming Seminary .....
York County Academy..

RHODE ISLAND.

As early as the year 1770 the question of establishing free public schools was agitated in Providence, the movement being led by the Rev. Dr. James Manning, President of Rhode Island College, assisted by his friend and associate Rev. Dr. Enos Hitchcock, pastor of the First Congregational church. As these efforts seemed about to succeed, the death of Dr. Manning occurred, and until the year 1800 no definite progress was made in the canse. In that year the general assembly passed an act establishing free schools in every town, in response to a petition of the Providence Association of Mechanics and Manufacturers. From the working classes, therefore, education received its first impetus in the State. Free schools were soon successfully established in Providence, embracing 988 pupils out of a population of 7,615. But the law met with strong opposition and was soon after repealed, and not until after the year 1820 were they permanently established in the State.

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SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. Number of towns in the State........

34 Number of children under fifteen years of age, (census 1860)...

56, 934 Number of children registered in school, (1868,) in winter...

29, 477 Number of children registered in school, (1868,) in summer......

26,540 Average attendance .......

23, 857 Number of schools.....

650 Number of teachers in summer-gentlemen 62; ladies 549........

611 Number of teachers in winter-ladies 500; gentlemen 173 ...

673 Number of weeks of school year .... Amount of permanent school fund....

$412, 685 State appropriation, (1869)..

$90,000 State appropriation, (1868) ...

$70,000 Appropriation by towns, (1869)....

$381, 445 81 Appropriation by towns, (1868)..

$199, 860 55 Expenditures for school-louses (1868–69)..........

$85, 845 22 Increase over previous year.....

........ $23, 536 10 Appropriations for State teachers' institutes ....

......... $500 00 For “Rhode Island Schoolmaster”...

$300 00 For normal instruction ..........

$1,500.00 The whole amount of town appropriations for the public schools in 1859 was $88,922 89, and for 1869 it was $244,845 86, showing for the ten years an increase of $152,922 97 ; an amount nearly double the total appropriation of 1859. This, with the increased appropriation of the State for schools of $10,000, gives the State $192,922 97 more to expend for public schools than it had ten years ago. The tax on each $100 for the support of schools varies in the several towns from 4 to 26 cents, and the leugth of the school year in the several towns varies accordingly. In the city of Providence the length of the school year is forty-one weeks, while in West Greenwich it is twenty weeks; while other towns range between these two extremes, and the average length of the schools of the State is thirty-three and two-fifths weeks. The law requires school to be kept at least four months. During the year pine teachers' institutes were held; two in each county of the State but one were well attended, and instrumental not only in conveying instruction, but in arousing a more lively interest among both teachers and parents.

TUSI UCUon.......................

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PROVIDENCE.

During the past year a large and elegant grammar school building has been almost completed, and when finished the city will be provided with two buildings for school purposes unsurpassed for beauty and convenience. While great improvements have been made in the grammar schools, the high school remains in nearly the same condition as when it was first established twenty-seven years ago. Only a small proportion of the number of pupils in the public schools ever go into the high schools, the great work of education being accomplished in the grammar, intermediate, and primary schools. Of those who do enter the high school, the number of boys who completo the course is very small, being drawn off by tempting offers to enter offices or stores. The arrangements for the primary schools are not so good as for the others, being “ too often bid from sight in obscure streets, and repelling the visitors by their mean arrangements and wretched ventilation.” In many parts of the city schools are very much crowded; which fact, taken with the lack of sanitary arrangements, is thought to account for much of the ill-health among children.

EVENING SCHOOLS IN PROVIDNECE.

Six evening schools are in very successful operation. During twenty weeks 1,931 pupils were registered—1,407 boys ard 524 girls; an increase of 363 over the registry of the previous year. The seats are all filled, and many have to be rejected for whom there is no room. The ages of these pupils have ranged all the way froin ten to forty years. Many were so earnest that they came to the school night after night directly from their work without waiting for their supper. Their progress has consequently been marked, many having accomplished more in five months than day-school pupils during a whole year.

In the closing examination of one of these schools, at which the governor of the State, the mayor of the city, and other distinguished persons were present, the salutatory was by a young man, Thomas Murphy, who bas, besides working diligently at his trade, that of beltmaker, for three years attended the evening schools to such good purpose that he has just finished a course in Greek, Latin, and mathematics, and is now ready for the university with a view to studying the profession of the law. The final essay, with the valedictory address, was by Eliza A. Boyle, who for four years or more has worked in a mill from early morning until a quarter to seven in the evening, coming from the mill to school, and taking her supper after school. She is now nineteen years of age, and “her education will compare favorably with not a few who graduate at the high school.”

A benevolent association of ladies, known as the “Irrepressibles," support an evening school exclusively for ladies. The superintendent of public schools has furnished books for their use and seats for their accommodation. It is taught by Miss Harriet N. Metcalf, and is attended by about thirty pupils.

List of school officers.

Hon. THOMAS W. BICKNELL, Proridence, secretary of the board of education and commis

sioner of public schools.

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Rev. Daniel Leach..
F. W. Tilton..........
George N. Bliss......
Rev. Francis Horton...
Robert S. Andrews....
Rev. 0. P. Fuller.......
Rev. N. B. Cooke.......
Rev. Orin H. True......
Samuel H. Cross.
James W. Bullock..
J. H. Rockwell......
Leland B. Jenckes.....
Andrew Jenks.

Providence.
Newport.
East Providence.
Barrington.
Bristol.
Warwick.
Cumberland.
Scituate.
Westerly.
Cranston.
North Kingston
Woonsocket.
North Providen

Table of statistical details of schools in Rhode Island for the year 1869.

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SOUTH CAROLINA.

Hon. J. K. Jilson, State superintendent, in his report for 1869, states that in September 1868, immediately after the passage of the law providing for the organization of the educational department of the State, the several county commissioners were notified and instructed by the superintendent as to the work to be done. He states that the work has been delayed by causes beyond his control. Some of the commissioners failed to report, and some have failed to qualify. The failure of the general assembly to pass a school bill at last session bas delayed work for nearly a year. The children of the State are daily growing up in ignorance.

Statistical tables and county reports, as far as received, are transmitted, from which it appears that the chief obstacles to the establishment of an efficient system of free schools are want of funds, indifference resulting from the ignorance of the people, and a deeply-rooted prejudice against mixed schools, both races being equally opposed to the plan.

From the report of the agent of the Peabody fund, it appears that the “ Saturday Normal School” in Charleston, which had been discontinued from want of funds, was revived last year by aid afforded by the Peabody fund. To Greenville $1,000 was given the past year toward the education of 500 children; citizens contributing $2,500. This year they have increased their appropriation to $4,500, and the fund has added $500. Columbia is allowed $2,000 “ on same conditions as before.” Pine Ridge Free School receives $300; Abbeville the same, and $600 promised to two schools in Beaufort, on condition that they give means of education to all the children in the town. Efforts made in Sumter and other places have not yet been successful. From a report of Rev. J. W. Alvord, general superintendent of freedmen's schools, dated Charleston, January 11, 1870, we have information of 8 schools-in all, about 2,500 pupilsand," with one or two exceptions, all in good condition;" one of them, the -- Freedmen's Pay School,” entirely supported by colored people, and with colored teachers, which, as Mr. Alvord remarks, *is a land-mark showing the progress of the people." A liberal fund is needed to keep these schools in good condition.

Table of statistical details of schools in South Carolina, by counties, from the State roport, doted

January 24, 1870.
Hon. J. K. JILSON, Stato superintendent of education, Columbia, South Carolina.

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