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Etat E. Budget Général des Revenus de l'Etat pour l'Exercice 1822.

DESIGNATION DES REVENUS ET IMPOTS.

Produits

bruts présumés.

Francs.

166,165,000 19,902,000

1o. Produits spécialement affectés à la Dette Consolidée. Enregistrement, timbre et Domaine, et produits accessoires des Forêts Coupes de bois de l'ordinaire de 1822. (Principal des adjudications payables en traites) Douanes et sels. Droits de douanes et de Navigation et Recettes accidentelles

76,000,000 Droits sur les sels

52,000,000

128,000,000 Produits présumés des amendes et confiscations attribuées 2,000,000

130,000,000

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2°. Produits affectés aux Dépenses générales de l'Etat. Excédant éventuel des produits ci-dessus sur le service de la Dette Consolidée

Mémoire. Contributions indirectes. Droits généraux

122,900,000 Vente des tabacs

64,800,000 Vente des poudres à feu

3,300,000 Recouvremens d'arances

900,000 Produit des amendes et confiscations. (Portion attribuée. ) 1,350,000

193,250,000 Postes

23,900,000 Loteries

14,000,000 Versement au Trésor par la Ville de Paris, en vertu de la Loi du 19 Juillet, 1820

5,500,000 Produits divers. Salines de l'Est

2,400,000 Produits de l'Inde

1,000,000
Recettes de diverses Origines

1,455,710
Arrérages de Rentes et Intérêts de Fonds Publics appartenant
au Trésor

867,290
Arrérages des Rentes affectées au remboursement des deux
premiers cinquièmes des reconnaissances de liquidation 4,299,031

10,022,031 Contributions directes. Principal et centimes additionnels

297,776,868 Centimes de perception

14,870,132

312,617,000

559,289,031 Transport au Budget de l'Exercice 1822, de l'excédant de Recette sur l'Exercice, 1820. 37,971,620

Total Francs 597,260,851

Récapitulation des Recettes. 1°. Produits affectés à la Dette Consolidée

2°. Produits affectés aux Dépenses Générales Montant présumé des produits propres au Budget de l’Exercice, 1822

316,067,000
597,260,651
913,327,651

Récettes pour Ordre. Instruction Publique

2,424,200 Direction générale des poudres et salpêtres

3,148,096

5,572,296 Total général Francs 918,899,947

Résultat.

Les Recettes présumées sont de
Les Dépenses (Etats A. et B.) de

918,899,947 :

904,917,941 Francs 13,982,006

Excédant de Recettes

.

Certifie conforme: Le Ministre Secrétaire d'Etat au Département des Finances,

JH. DE VILLELE.

BRITISH ORDER in COUNCIL, prohibiting the exporta

tion of Gunpowder, Arms, &c. to Spain, to certain Parts of Africa, to the West Indies, or to certain Parts of America, 18th May, 1822

At the Court at Carlton House, the 18th of May, 1822.

PRESENT, THE KING's MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY IN COUNCIL.

WHEREAS the time limited by His Majesty's Order in Council of the 14th of November last, for prohibiting the exportation of gunpowder, arms, or ammunition, to the Places therein specified, will expire on the 30th day of this instant May; and whereas it is expedient that the said prohibition should be continued for some time longer; His Majesty, by and with the advice of His Privy Council, doth hereby order, require, prohibit, and command, that no Person or Persons whatsoever (except the Master-General of the Ordnance of His Majesty's Service) do, at any time during the space of 6 months (to cominence from the 30th day of this instant May,) presume to transport any gun-powder or salt-petre, or any sort of arms, or ammunition, to any Port or Place within the Dominions of the King of Spain, or to any Port or Place on the Coast of Africa (except to any Ports or Places within the Streights of Gibraltar,) or in the West Indies, or on any part of the Continent of America (except to a Port or Place, or Ports or Places in His Majesty's Territories or Possessions on the Continent of North America, or in the Territories of the United States of America,) or ship or lade any gun-powder or salt-petre, or any sort of arms or ammunition, on board any Ship or Vessel, in order to transporting the same into any such Ports or Places, within the Dominions of the King of Spain, or into any such Ports or Places on the Coast of Africa (except as above excepted,) or in the West Indies, or on the Continent of America (except as above excepted,) without leave or permission in that behalf first obtained from His Majesty, or His Privy Council, upon pain of incurring and suffering the respective forfeitures and penalties inflicted by an Act, passed in the 29th Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Second, intituled “ An Act to em-. power His Majesty to prohibit the exportation of gun-powder, or any sort of arms or ammunition, and also to empower His Majesty to restrain the carrying coastwise of salt-petre, gun-powder, or any sort of arms or ammunition;" and also by an Act, passed in the 33d Year of His late Majesty's Reign, cap. 2, intituled “An Act to enable His Majesty to restrain the exportation of Naval Stores, and more effectually to prevent the exportation of salt-petre, arms, and ammunition, when prohibited by Proclamation or Order in Council.”

And the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of His Ma. jesty's Treasury, the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord

High Admiral of Great Britain, the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, the Master-General and the rest of the Principal Officers of the Ordnance, and His Majesty's Secretary at War, are to give the necessary directions herein as to them may respectively appertain.

C. C. GREVILLE.

DECLARATION of the Bey of Tunis, relative to the Duty

on Rice imported in British Ships, 28th May, 1822.

From the created of God Almighty, and who expects his mercy, Mahmoud Bashaw, Bey of Tunis, to the Commander Captain Warren, and to the Aid-de-camp, Ponsonby.

I have received your Letter, dated the 6th of Ramadan, in which you say that the English Consul resident here has informed your Government, that a duty of 3 per cent has been laid on rice imported into Tunis by British Subjects, which is an infraction of the Treaty between me and the British Government, and that you have been directed by your Government to speak on this affair, and to say that your King feels persuaded that I should give up this duty on rice, not to interrupt the peace and long friendship which exists between the two Go vernments; and all that you continue on to say, I have well understood.

The answer to what has been said, is, that this custom duty on rice, was formerly on all Merchants who brought rice into Tupis from all Nations, and we do not find it otherwise specified in the Treaties with England.

As it appears to you that this affair brings interruption of the peace and ancient friendship between the two Governments, it is hereby, from this moment, given up for English Merchants who may bring rice into Tunis, and they will not pay on the said article any custom duty, as I am not desirous of disturbing that friendship for such a trifling thing.

After this, however, I shall send some one on my part to speak with your Government on this affair, if God Almighty pleases.

Written the 7th of Ramadan, 1237 of the Hegira; 28th of May, 1822, of the Christian era.

[Seal of the Bey.)

BRITISH ORDER in COUNCIL, prohibiting the exporta

tion of Gunpowder, Arms, &c. to Spain, to certain Parts of Africa, to the West Indies, or to certain Parts of America. 15th November, 1822.

At the Court at Brighton, the 15th of November, 1822.

PRESENT, THE KING’s MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY IN COUNCIL,

WHEREAS the time limited by His Majesty's Order in Council of the 18th of May last, for prohibiting the exportation of gun-powder, arms, or ammunition, to the Places therein specified, will expire on the 30th day of this instant November; and whereas it is expedient, that the said prohibition should be continued for some time longer; His Majesty, by and with the advice of His Privy Council, doth hereby order, require, prohibit, and command, that no Person or Persons whatsoever (except the Master-General of the Ordnance for His Majesty's Service) do, at any time during the space of 6 months (to commence from the 30th day of this instant November,) presume to transport any gun-powder or salt-petre, or any sort of arms or ammunition, to any Port or Place within the Dominions of the King of Spain, or to any Port or Place on the Coast of Africa (except to any Ports or Places within the Streights of Gibraltar,) or in the West Indies, or on any part of the Continent of America (except to a Port or Place, or Ports or Places in His Majesty's Territories or Possessions on the Contipent of North America, or in the Territories of the United States of America,) or ship or lade any gun-powder or salt-petre, or any sort of arms, or ammunition, on board any Ship or Vessel, in order to transporting the same into any such Ports or Places within the Dominions of the King of Spain, or into any such Port or Place on the Coast of Africa (except as above excepted,) or in the West Indies, or on the Continent of America (except as above excepted,) without leave or permission in that behalf first obtained from His Majesty, or His Privy Council, upon pain of incurring and suffering the respective forfeitures and penalties inflicted by an Act, passed in the 29th Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Second, intituled “An Act to empower His Majesty, to prohibit the exportation of gun-powder, or any sort of arms or ammunition, and also to empower His Majesty to restrain the carrying coastwise of salt-petre, gun-powder, or any sort of arms or ammunition;" and also by an Act, passed in the 33d Year of His late Majesty's Reign, cap. 2, intituled “ An Act to enable His Majesty to restrain the exportation of Naval Stores, and more effectually to prevent the exportation of salt-petre, arms, and ammunition, when prohibited by Proclamation or Order in Council.”

And the Right Honourable the Lords Comissioners of His Majesty's Treasury, the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain, the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, the Master-General and the rest of the Principal Officers of the Ordnance, and His Majesty's Secretary at War, are to give the necessary directions herein as to them may respectively appertain.

JAS, BULLER.

MESSAGE of the President of The United States to Con

gress, relative to the Governments of Spanish America. 8th March, 1822.

Message from the President of The United States, transmitting, in

pursuance of a Resolution of the House of Representatives, of the 30th Jan.last, Communications from the Agents of The United States, with the Governments South of The United States which have declared their Independence; and the Communications from the Agents of such Governments in The United States with the Secretary of State, as tend to shew the Political Condition of their Governments, and the

state of the War between them and Spain. To the House of Representatives of The United States.

IN transmitting to the House of Representatives the Documents called for by the Resolution of that House, of the 30th January, I consider it my duty to invite the attention of Congress to a very important subject, and to communicate the sentiments of the Executive on it, that, should Congress entertain similar sentiments, there may be such co-operation between the two Departments of the Government as their respective rights and duties may require.

The revolutionary movement in the Spanish Provinces in this He. misphere attracted the attention and excited the sympathy of our Fellow-Citizens from its commencement. This feeling was natural and bonourable to them, from causes which need not be communicated to you. It has been gratifying to all to see the general acquiescence which has been manifested in the policy which the constituted Authorities have deemed it proper to pursue in regard to this Contest. As soon as the movement assumed such a steady and consistent form as to make the success of the Provinces probable, the Rights to which they were entitled by the Law of Nations, as equal Parties to a Civil War, were extended to them. Each Party was permitted to enter our Ports with its publick and private Ships, and to take from them every Article which was the subject of Commerce with other Nations. Our Citizens, also, have carried on Commerce with both Parties, and the Government has protected it, with each, in articles not contraband of War. Through the whole of this Contest The United States have remained neutral, and have fulblled with the utmost impartiality all the obligations incident to that character.

This Contest has now reached such a stage, and been attended with such decisive success on the part of the Provinces, that it merits the most profound consideration whether their right to the rank of Independent Nations, with all the advantages incident to it, in their Intercourse with The United States, is not complete. Buenos Ayres assumed that rank by a formal Declaration in 1816, and has enjoyed it

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