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the tree, measuring full 7 inches in circumference, LADY'S DEPARTMENT.
and quite a number of others from 6 to 6 inches;
and six of them weighed a pound.
The specimens I send you are not so large as

DOMESTIC RECIPES.
they are the last of the season. Hoping they will
reach you in good condition, so that you may test

CANDIED ORANGE OR LEMON PEEL.—Boil the their deliciousness, I remain, very respectfully yours,

rind from thick skin oranges or lemons in plenty of Leominster, Sept. 5.

C. C. FIELD. water, until they are tender, and the bitterness is

out; change the water once or twice, if necessary. REMARKS. — The apricots were received in good Clarify

half a pound of sugar with a half a cup of condition, and were as delicious as any we have ever water for each pound of peel; when it is clear, put tasted. Indeed, we never saw finer grown at the in the peels, cover them, and boil them until clear, South. We think the variety the Peach, though and the syrup almost a candy; then take them out,

and lay them on inverted sieves to dry; boil the the Peach and Moorpark bear a strong resemblance.

syrup with additional sugar, then put in the peels; Thank you, sir.

stir them about until the sugar candies around

them ; then take them on a sieve, and set them inWHAT IS THE EXPENSE OF KEEPING A HORSE ? to a warm oven, or before a fire; when perfectly MR. EDITOR :-Cannot some of your numerous sub- dry, pack them in a wooden box with tissue-paper scribers, who have made and are continually making

between. experiments, give us the actual expense attending TO MAKE FRUIT-PIES.—No under crust should the keeping of horses ? Probably there are more be made to apple or any fruit-pie. It is always persons directly and indirectly interested in this heavy and not fit to eat. Place a narrow rim of matter, than most any other which could be men- paste around the edge of the plate, and fill with tioned.

the fruit, either raw or stewed, and cover it. The We will say the horse is a good feeder, weighs juices will be retained much better, and it will save nine hundred pounds, and is required to labor every a sight of flour and butter, which is no trifling conday, to that extent which will not injure him; hay sideration in these days, and what is of more conseat twenty dollars per ton, and meal at one dollar per bushel . What I would wish to know, is, what cutting, they are taken out with a spoon.

quence, save dyspepsia, which costs more. After would probably be the expense of keeping a horse, per annum, under these circumstances, including MILK IN BREAD.-I have more objections than shoeing? Can the horse be kept in proper condi- one to milk in bread, but the most serious is, that tion for less than one hundred and twenty dollars ? persons of advanced age, who are in the daily use of In this I calculate he will consume two tons of hay, milk-made bread, will be expected to suffer from an about sixty-eight and a half bushels of meal, and over supply of osseous or bony matter, and particuthe cost of shoeing ten dollars. If there is any larly if their kidneys be affected. Bread should alcheaper or better way, I should be very glad to ways be made with water, and when so made, it is have some of your correspondents inform me what suitable for the aged and the young, the sick and it is, and much oblige one who is deeply interested the well. And as for sour milk, a microscopic view in the subject. Respectfully,

would, I presumc, present additional arguments East Weymouth, Aug. 27, 1855.

against its use.

:-Water Cure Journal. REMARKS.—Will some of our numerous readers TO PRESERVE IRON AND STEEL KNIVES EROM who have paid attention to this matter, reply to the Rust.--Procure some melted virgin wax-the purimportant queries propounded above ?

er the better—and rub it thoroughly over the blades of the knives. After it has dried, warm the knives, and having carefully removed the wax from the sur

face, rub them briskly with a dry cloth, until the On looking over the return of work done by mow- original polish is fully' restored. This will fill all ing machines, the present season, I find Manny's pores with the unctious and minute particles of the Machine, made by Adriance & Co., of Worcester, wax, which will adhere firmly, and prevent the inhas cut 150 acres in 140 hours, averaging one and trusion of water or moisture which is the cause of a half tons to the acre, at an expense of accidents rust

. They will retain their brilliancy for weeks, if less than $5. If this machine will continue to op- used. erate as well, I think it will not fail to find employment.

To EXTRACT A GLASS STOPPLE.—Wran a large strip of wool around the neck of the bottle, once; fasten one end of this firmly to some stationary ob

ject, and hold the other end in the hund. "SeeI should be much obliged to you for a description, "saw” the neck of the bottle, and the friction will so through your paper, of a yellow loam soil; i. e., it heat the latter that it will expand sufficiently to althat is a proper name for a soil.

low the stopple being removed with ease. A NORTHERN SUBSCRIBER. Canaan, Vt., 1855.

TO CLEAN PAINT.—Smear a piece of flannel with REMARKS.

common whiting, mixed to the consistency of comWill some one cultivating such a

mon paste, in warm weather. Rub the surface to soil describe it to the inquirer?

be cleaned quite briskly, and wash off with pure

cold water. Grease spois will in this way be almost Wool.--"J. B. P.,” of Rutland, Vt., will please instantly removed, as well as other filth, and the accept our thanks, for his proposition to furnish us paint will retain its brilliancy and beauty unimsamples of wool.

paired.

N. Q. T.

WORK DONE BY MOWING MACHINES.

A YELLOW LOAM SONI..

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ment of FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES, and being deRATES OF ADVERTISING.

sirous of reducing the same, and greatly curtailing his amount For one Page, one insertion,

$10,00 of the most approved varieties, in part as follows:

of stock, would call attention to the same, consisting as it does For one Page, six months,

55,00 50,000 Apple, choice variety, from 6 to 10 feet high, at from For one Page, one year,

100,00 $12 to $14 per hundred.

15,000 Pear, 4 to 8 feet, at $30 per hundred, For one-half Page, one insertion,

5,00 15,100 Cherry, 6 to 10 feet, at $20 per hundred, For one-half Page, six months,

28,00 20,000 Plum, 3 to 5 feet,

from 1 to 3 years from the inoculation,

55,00 For one-half Page, one year,

at $28 to $34 per hundred.

Apricots on Plum Stocks, from 1 to 2 years from the inocu-
Advertisements of less than half a page will be lation, $25 to $30 per hundred. Those of one year's growth
charged at the rate of six cents per line, nonpareil. Also Peach, Quince, Raspberry, Currant Grapevines, Hybrid
No discount will be made from the above rates. Perpetual and other Roses, Shrubs, Vines, &c., &c. A fine

stock of Dwarf Trees of Apple, Pear and Cherry. Also 10,000
Deciduous Ornamental Trees, consisting in part of 10 varieties

of Elm, 6 Maple, 6 Chestnuts, 4 Beach, 6 Ash, 2 Birch, 5 Linden, New-Rochelle or Lawton 2 Larch, Cypress, Tulips, Osage Orange, Alder, &c., &c. A

large portion of the above are of large size, and fine form,

among them are some of the most desirable Weeping Trees. BLACKBERRY.

20,000 Evergreen Trees of fine size and beautiful form, such

as Norway, and other Spruce; 6 varieties Pines, 5 Arbor Vitae, The subscriber has been appointed agent hy Messrs. George Code : Junipers, 2 Yews Balsam of Bir and Tree Box. Seymour & Ctthe sale of

The Ornamental will be sold reduced uine Plants, direct from their grounds, of this new and superior From persons with whom we are unacquainted the Cash or a variety, fruit very large and sweet. It is an enormous bearer. satisfactory reference will be required. Fine, strong plants will be ready for delivery in October and Catalogues sent to all post-paid applications by the subscriber. November, or March and April next, at $5 per dozen plants.

DANIEL BRINCKERHOFF,

Fishkill Landing, Sept. 1st, 1855.
Also for sale, New or Pure Red Antwerp Raspberry Plants,
Fruit TreetoGrape Vines, &c.; 15,000 Pear Trees on Quince Ruggles, Nourse, Mason & Co.,

; 10,000 do. doPear
low prices.
GEO. DAVENPORT,

Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of 14 Commercial, corner of Chatham Street, Bosion. October, 1855.

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS

AND MACHINES, TO PERSONS OUT OF EMPLOYMENT.

Such as Horse Powers and Threshers, The Great Book of the Year.

FANNING MILLS, KETCHUM'S MOWERS,

HORSE AND HAND RAKES, From the Editors of the Philadelphia Post.-"We think we may safely pronounce this to be the most thorough and valua

Superior Plows, of all kinds and Sizes, ble work on the Empire of Russia that has yet appeared in the English language.

HORSE HOES, SEED SOWERS, CORN PLANTERS, PORProm the Editor of American Phi. Courier.-"Truly a

TABLE GRINDING MILLS, valuable work-the great book of the day.”

Hay, Stalk and Straw Cutters, Send for one Copy, and try it among your Friends.

STORE TRUCKS, SHOVELS, WORK FOR ALL, AND WORK THAT PAYS,

SPADES, FORKS, HOES, &c.
In selling, in every County in the United States our new work
on the “RUSSIAN EMPIRE," and other popular PICTORIAL MANUFACTORY AT WORCESTER,
BOOKS. Terms, Catalogues, and Canvassing Circulars, for-
warded free of postage, on addressing,

WAREHOUSE,
ROBERT SEARS, Publisher,

181 William Street, New York. Quincy Hall, Boston, Mass.
37 SEND FOR ONE COPY.-Single copies of the work on
"RUSSIA," (the most elegant and useful volume of the year,)

January, 1855.
carefully enveloped in stout paper, and forwarded at our risk
and expense to any Post-office, on the receipt of the retail price,

WOOD ENGRAVING.
TERE DOLLARS. Early application is necessary to secure the
most beautiful and perfect coples.
PERSONS WISHING TO ACT AS AGENTS, and do a

D. B. GULICK,
safe business, can send for a specimen volume, and a well-
bound Subscription Book, (price of both $3,25, sent free of post- ENGRAVER ON WOOD,
age,) and obtain from one to two hundred subscribers, to be de-
livered at a certain time to be agreed on, say in thirty or forty No. 191 WASHINGTON STREET.. ...BOSTON.
days from the time of signing. Address as above. R.S.

[Entrance on Norfolk Avenue.]
Every description of Wood Engraving promptly executed
on the most reasonable terms. Designs furnished. Call and
see specimens.
ly-oct. *ly.

Sept. 22.
MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF

FERTILIZERS.
GUNS, RIFLES AND PISTOLS,

DeBurg's No. 1 Superphosphate of Lime.
Cast Steel and Iron Rifle Barrels, Best Peruvian and Mexican Guano.
GUN LOCKS AND GUN TRIMMINGS.

Ground Bone. Ground Plaster.
Dealer in the Hazard Company and Enfield Company's Sport-

Poudrette ;-Lodi Manufacturing Company.
ing Powder, of various qualities and sizes of grain, elegantly Pulverized Charcoal. Sulphate of Ammonia.
put up in Kegs and Canisters, and manufactured expressly for
the Boston market. Also, Shot and Balls, Percussion Caps,

ALSO FOR SALE,
Hunting Knives and Flasks, Powder Flasks, Shot Pouches, Grass Seeds of Reliable Quality.
Game Bags, Fish Baskets, &c. &c. Embracing every descrip-
tion of Hunters Goods.

GEO. DAVENPORT,
19 Washington Street, Boston.

No. 5 Commercial, corner of Chatham St., Boston. A ma

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