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For a' that, and a' that,

Our toils obscure, and a' that ;
The rank is but the guinea stamp,

The man 's the gowd for a' that!
What tho' on hamely fare we dine,

Wear hoddin grey, and a' that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine,

A man 's a man for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,

Their tinsel show, and a' that,
The honest man, though e'er sae poor,

Is king o' men for a' that !
You see yon birkie, ca'd a lord,

Wha struts, and stares, and a' that ;
Though hundreds worship at his word,

He's but a coof for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,

His riband, star, and a' that,
The man of independent mind,

He looks and laughs at a' that !
A king can mak' a belted knight,

A marquis, duke, and a' that ;
But an honest man 's aboon his might,

Guid faith, he mauna fa' that ;
For a' that, and a' that,

Their dignities, and a' that,
The pith o'sense and pride o' worth

Are higher ranks than a' that!
Then let us pray that come it may-

As come it will for a' that-
That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth,

May bear the gree, and a' that ; gowd] gold.

hoddin grey) coarse undyed woollen cloth. birkie) fellow. coof] ninny, fool.

aboon) above. fa' that], take that in hand, bear the gree) take the prize,

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For a' that, and a' that,

It 's comin' yet, for a' that,
That man to man, the warld o'er,

Shall brothers be for a' that!

Burns.

71

Auld Lang Syne

SHOULD auld acquaintance be forgot,

And never brought to min'?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days o' lang syne ?

For auld lang syne, my dear,

For auld lang syne,
We 'll tak’ a cup o' kindness yet

For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,

And pu'd the gowans fine ;
But we've wander'd mony a weary foot
Sin' auld lang syne.

For auld, etc.

We twa hae paidl’t i' the burn,

Frae mornin' sun till dine ;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

For auld, etc.

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And here 's a hand, my trusty fiere,

And gie 's a hand o' thine ;
And we'll tak'a right guid-willie waught
For auld lang syne.

For auld, etc.

gowans] daisies.

fiere] fere, mate, comrade, guid-willie waught], friendly draught,

And surely ye 'll be your pint-stoup,

And surely I 'll be mine ;
And we 'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne.
For auld, etc.

Burns.

72 The Song of the Western Men

(1688)
A GOOD sword and a trusty hand !

A merry heart and true !
King James's men shall understand

What Cornish lads can do.

And have they fix'd the where and when ?

And shall Trelawny die ?
Here's twenty thousand Cornish men

Will know the reason why !

Out spake the captain, brave and bold,

A merry wight was he;
* If London Tower were Michael's hold,

We'll set Trelawny free!

'We 'll cross the Tamar, land to land,

The Severn is no stay,
With one and all, and hand in hand,

And who shall bid us nay ?

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. And when we come to London Wall,

A pleasant sight to view ;-
Come forth! come forth, ye cowards all,

Here's men as good as you!

*Trelawny he's in keep in hold,

Trelawny he may die;
But here 's twenty thousand Cornish bold
Will know the reason why!'

Hawker. *

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The Old Navy The captain stood on the carronade : ‘First lieutenant,'

73*

says he,

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Send all my merry men aft here, for they must list

to me ; I haven't the gift of the gab, my sons–because I'm

bred to the sea ; That ship there is a Frenchman, who means to fight

with we.
And odds bobs, hammer and tongs, long as I've

been to sea,
I've fought 'gainst every odds—but I've gain'd

the victory! * That ship there is a Frenchman, and if we don't

take she, 'Tis a thousand bullets to one, that she will capture we; I haven't the gift of the gab, my boys ; so each man

to his gun; If she's not mine in half an hour, I 'll flog each mother's

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son.

For odds bobs, hammer and tongs, long as I've

been to sea, I've fought 'gainst every odds—and I've gain'd

the victory!' We fought for twenty minutes, when the Frenchman

had enough; ' I little thought,' said he, ‘ that your men were of such

stuff';

Our captain took the Frenchman's sword, a low bow

made to he; 'I haven't the gift of the gab, monsieur, but polite I

wish to be.
And odds bobs, hammer and tongs, long as I've

been to sea,
I've fought 'gainst every odds—and I've gain'd

the victory!' Our captain sent for all of us : ‘My merry men,'

said he, * I haven't the gift of the gab, my lads, but yet I

thankful be : You've done your duty handsomely, each man stood

to his gun ; If you hadn't, you villains, as sure as day, I'd have

flogg'd each mother's son,
For odds bobs, hammer and tongs, as long as

I'm at sea,
I'll fight 'gainst every odds---and I 'll gain the

victory!

Marryat.

74

English Irregular: '99-'02

CHANT PAGAN

Me that ’ave been what I've been,
Me that ’ave gone where I've gone,
Me that 'ave seen what I've seen-
'Ow can I ever take on
With awful old England again,
An' 'ouses both sides of the street,
And 'edges two sides of the lane,
And the parson an' gentry' between,
An' touchin' my

'at when we meet-
Me that ’ave been what I've been ?

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