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junction or the piazzas included in that arrangement? They can be procured here, riveted up from iron plates, at twelve (12) cents per pound. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER.

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, June 3, 1868. SIR: During the month of May just passed there have been employed on this work eight carpenters, who have put together 139 segment head window-frames; cut, dressed, and framed stuff for nine (9) travelling head window-frames (for centre building, first and second stories ;) also cut and dressed stuff for 48 circular head window-frames, (for towers.)

They also built a rough shed, 14 by 20, and made necessary draughting boards for use of masons; and built and geared a 22-foot derrick ; made one dozen brick and one dozen mortar hods. In above work was used 4,000 feet clear and 2,000 feet common lumber.

They also set in the wall 10 basement window-frames, and painted (priming coat) 21 segment head frames. The cost of the work was $778 for wages and $40 for team work, which amount includes numerous miscellaneous items of necessary work hardly capable of specification. On the stone and brick work there have been employed 15 stone masons, 16 stone-cutters, 6 brick masons, 18 laborers, 1 master mason, 1 foreman, 1 blacksmith. The inside veranda and tower walls are now about 18 inches above the ground line. All the other stone walls are up to the ground line, except those of the main buildings, which are ready for the window-sills. About 50 feet of the ground line sill course are laid on the front of the south wing. About 100 feet of sill and water-table and 120 pieces of jamb stone (for doors and windows) are prepared for laying; 45,000 brick were laid during the month, making the whole number laid 95,000; cost, laid, $20 per thousand.

The amount of stone laid in the wall is 17,000 cubic feet, and a careful estimate makes the cost sixty-two (62) cents per foot; this is not quite so favorable as the estimate made when Mr. Rankin was here. The difference is due to the irregularity and deficiency of the supply of stone. I have no doubt Messrs. Sanger & Steel have acted in good faith; but the quarry did not open so favorably as was expected, and they are not getting so much good block rubble as was hoped; then, the transportation being in other hands causes delay. Mr. Steel's offer was for stone delivered “on canal boat or cars," and was so accepted. The weather, also, has been very bad for the greater part of the month. The falling off in the quality of the block rubble will necessitate the buying of more dimension for bonding stone and corners, which, I fear, will carry the cost up materially. I think I ought now to have authority to buy stone in the market at the best rates I can get; in this way I think I can make a considerable saving. It may also be worth considering whether after completing the basement of stone it may not be better to use brick for the remainder of the structure. The Milwaukee brick are of excellent quality, and at this distance from the city will retain their brightness. With brick the work can be pushed forward much more rapidly than with stone; with the latter it will drag, do the best I can.

H. Ex. Doc. 100_ 3

On the other hand, there are symptoms of a strike among the brick. layers ; they have been getting $4 50 per day in town, while we have paid but $4; we shall probably be obliged to advance 25 cents for the current month; there is no over-supply of workmen at the present time, Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, June 11, 1868. SIR: Your letter of the 8th instant is received.

I did not understand you, in your letter of the 29th of February last, as using the word contract in the strict sense of " written," as since that time there has been considerable correspondence on the subject which seem to leave it undefined. I have notified Messrs. Sanger & Steele to come forward and sign the contract. I had intended to take measures to have the transportation of the stone included in the contract, as I saw it was desirable to so arrange it; but I did not see it so clearly as I now do. Mr. Steele made the bid for stone, “ delivered on boat or cars," and it was so accepted. This has caused inconvenience and delay, but I will do what can be done to guard against it in future.

The quarrymen are on a strike for higher wages; how this may influence Messrs. Sanger & Steele in the matter of the contract I do not know, but will write and advise you when I ascertain. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, June 13, 1868. SIR: Upon referring to your letter of February 29, I see that the directions about making the contracts for stone were more distinct than I supposed when I wrote mine of the 11th instant, which I did without yours of the 29th February before ine. My attention was directed from the last-mentioned letter, perhaps, by its being put in a pigeon-hole in my office in town and not transferred as usual to the office at the work. No harm can, however, well arise from the delay. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, June 18, 1868. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th instant, with accompanying drawings (tracings) Nos. 11 and 12 of stone work, and Nos. 27, 28, 29, and 30, for the stairs of this hospital.

Also letter of same date relative to stone contract with Messrs. Sanger & Steele.

I have not changed my opinion as to the economy of using brick instead of stone. My late suggestion in regard to that matter was made more with reference to facility and rapidity of construction than from any other consideration then present to my mind. I believe, however, that I have not, at any time during our correspondence, expressed the opinion that stone would be as cheap as brick. I have supposed that it would cost more, and a considerable part of the extra cost of the stone would be in the handling after it was on the site. I have never looked upon the brick as architecturally preferable; on the contrary the stone seems to me more suitable in an artistic point of view, and for the basement, at any rate, almost indispensable. I am, very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

June 29, 1868. SIR: Messrs. Sanger & Steele, in answer to my request to them to sign contract for block rubble, reply as follows:

* We did not propose to furnish block rubble only (and exclusively) as your contract contemplates, but to furnish proportions of dimension, common and block rubble and flagging. We will, therefore, have to decline furnishing block rubble only, as it will require us to break dimension stone worth 45 cents per foot to sell for rubble.

I have on hand a supply of common rubble, and therefore included in the contract block rubble only.

If their objection to signing the contract is well taken or conclusive, I do not apprehend any serious loss in consequence. I have already been obliged to buy dimension stone of other parties to keep the work going, and have done so without loss, and I think can continue to do this.

Your letters of the 25th are received. The estimate, inquiring of cost of brick and stone, will be sent as soon as I can give you one with the requisite explanations, as there are several points to be considered in it, and we are just now about to make up our monthly estimate of cost of work done. The photographs will be attended to as directed. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, July 2, 1868. SIR: As the photographer requires longer time than I anticipated, I will report the result of a new and careful estimate of the comparative cost of brick and stone work.

In order to leave out of the calculation all questions of those details of finish, (as of cut stone window-caps, corners, &c.,) which might vary in the two materials, we estimated the cost of work in a pier of six feet breast, 22 inches thick, with a reveal of 12 inches. The cost of finishing the jambs in the stone work was estimated from the results of recent experience. The bricks were charged at $10 for common and $30 for Mil. waukee pressed. The result of the estimate of cost of six feet (one foot in height across the pier so as to include the two jambs) was $9 86 for the stone and $6 69 for the brick, or between 47 and 48 per cent, in favor of the brick. I am, very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.

P. S.-I have the estimate in detail, but thought it not worth while to trouble you with more than the result. Will send particulars, if desired.

W.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Ill., July 10, 1868. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the Sth instant, calling attention to the late act of Congress making eight hours a day's work. Orders have been issued accordingly. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Treasury Department.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, II., July 11, 1868. SIR: We have recently received two boatloads of block rubble from Messrs. Sanger & Steel, but it still seems difficult to get dimension stone as ordered. The block rubble is so heavy that it will not work well in the prescribed courses unless we make the corners 14 inches or more thick, and to get those corners we shall have to order dimension stone. A member of the firm (of Sanger & Steel) was here yesterday, and for the first time intimated that they would be quite willing that we should get stone from other parties. Upon my explaining to him the advantage we should have in using common rubble in our courses as directed to be laid, he admitted that their common rubble is not of good color. So they send the block and that will force us, as mentioned above, to get dimension stone for the corners. We have now stone enough ready (prepared) to finish the basement story, except the water table.

A change from stone to brick would leave us with about 50 cords of rubble on hand. A large part of this might be used in the engine house, cesspools, and other walls outside.

I forward by this mail three photographic views taken on the 1st instant, one from the southeast, one from the southwest, one from the northwest. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, July 16, 1868. SIR: Your letter of the 10th instant, referring to the cost of stone masonry, &c., was duly received, and I have given the subject of it careful consideration.

On some points we may be able to do a little better than intimated in my letter of the 2d instant; but on the whole it will not be safe to lower the estimate then made. The “block rubble" will not make the jambs and corners, except in a few instances of here and there a stone, and “dimensions” or “irregular dimensions" must be purchased for this purpose. The latter can be had for, say 30 cents per cubic foot, delivered on our dock, and of a quality more readily and cheaply worked than that from Joliet, which is harder than that from the Lamont quarry. The relative cost of brick and stone will be as stated. But if we change to brick, questions at once arise, how much of the expensive stone finishings which make up so large a proportion of the cost of the remaining portions of the building shall be retained, or how they shall be modified. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, August 1, 1868. DEAR SIR: I have called several times to day but have not been able to see you.

Mr. Steel desired me to say that if you wished to see him he would come up to-night. I was to inform him by telegraph after seeing you ; but, as I have waited as long as I can without missing the train, I will have to leave it for you to do. Should you desire to see him a despatch to Joliet will bring him up to-night. Very respectfully,

JAMES B. SPEER. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

August 6, 1868. SIR: A careful estimate of the comparative cost of brick and stone, made as directed on your recent visit, make the ratio of brick to stone as 21 to 25.

Considering the uncertainty of the supply of brick, the amount of block rubble would necessarily attend a change of material, it is decidedly best to go on with the stone, and I have taken steps accordingly. By getting certain portions of the work done on the stone by the machinery at the yard, we can make a considerable saving. I have ordered the window dressings, and will probably arrange with another party for the panels to-morrow. Mr. Lawrence has exerted himself in the matter, (under the stimulus of your suggestions,) and we will get the stone on favorable terms.

Are the key-stones to be put into the window heads of the wings? It

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